accepting ones career limitations

bluebeard
bluebeard Member Posts: 260
I am just about facing up to it

would love to be a teacher, would love to be a nurse ..


but with this chronic pain ?


and the training required for me, at 43, to get into it ?

had a little cry yesterday

:cry:

but gonna look to see if I can help out people , because thats my vocation, in other ways

something less stressful and more realistic

:)

Comments

  • vickey
    vickey Member Posts: 1
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    bluebeard wrote:
    I am just about facing up to it

    would love to be a teacher, would love to be a nurse ..


    but with this chronic pain ?


    and the training required for me, at 43, to get into it ?

    had a little cry yesterday

    :cry:

    but gonna look to see if I can help out people , because thats my vocation, in other ways

    something less stressful and more realistic

    :)

    Hi, you know there are several caring profession jobs you could do without vasts amount of painful movement. I am just about to start a part time course in Counselling and Psychotherapy which will give me qualifications to practice and I will be counselling patients from year 2 of my course. I just though I would mention it to you in case it was something that you might be interested in. It is at www.chrysaliscourses.co.uk. Let me know how you get on if you decide to go down this path.

    I hope that this has been some help to you :)
  • bluebeard
    bluebeard Member Posts: 260
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    many thanks, I am looking at the befriending side of things as well
  • miss_l
    miss_l Member Posts: 138
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can completely understand and sympathise!
    I was a radiographer and now im a teacher but have told by my bosses to think abou mt career and the limitations my disability may place on it.
    At 28 i dont think 3 different careers will look good on my CV so i'm worried about that aspect too!

    x
  • bluebeard
    bluebeard Member Posts: 260
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    big hugs to you xx

    I was thinking of a career in health...but nursing, physio, radiographer ( you ) , occupational health....is not only a tough training course for any of those...the jobs themselves are also stressful

    and ofc ourse, can be a source of conflict..especially when people are unwell...sometimes you get thier anger
  • gingerbread
    gingerbread Member Posts: 1
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi everyone.

    I can totally understand all of your frustration. I am also 28 and have been a teacher for nearly 4 years now. Before that I had 4 years of voluntary work because I could only just about walk, let alone work. I have been filling in job applications thinking that that doesnt look too good either.

    I am wondering what exactly is the perfect job for one with arthritis? Admin?! Im not sure that would hold my interest for long.

    Although the RA is practically controlled and I have no pain really, I still get so very tired. For instance, I start at 8.30am and could have a nice long nap by 11! This is not good. My current, and previous, before all of the voluntary work, employers havent understood and I have just been faced with warnings at work because I have failed to fulfill my role....because I just want to sleep!

    What do we do, employment wise?
  • woodbon
    woodbon Member Posts: 4,969
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    I worked as a carer, mainly for elderly people with end stage dementia. Not everybodies idea of a career, I know, but I loved it. You get the challenge to find new ways of communicating and detecting reasons for problems and illness as these people can't tell you how they feel. Also the relationships that you build up with the patients, and ways of improving lifestyle. We had to monitor medication and its effects, no chemical coshes but some people do need some help to stop accute symtoms that could damage themselves or others.

    The down side is that with arther their is no way I could carry on 7 hours on your feet, heavy lifting hoists to wheel around, beds to change often, assisting with restraining a violent outburst, which sometimes comes from no-where. Well, you can see the problems. I have been retired medically with my full pension, yet I'm still having trouble claiming esa, they say I'm fine, apart from not being able to sit for more that half an hour!
    Sorry rant over!!! :oops: :wink:
    Love Sue
  • bluebeard
    bluebeard Member Posts: 260
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    lots of love to you all xx

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