Working with computers

doverliz
doverliz Member Posts: 16
I work in an office mainly on the computer and it is becoming increasingly painful to use a mouse. Has anyone tried a differently shaped mouse? I have seen one online that you use with your hand at right angles to the desk but it is fairly expensive and I don't want to buy it unless I was fairly confident that it would help. I have RA and using a mouse seems to sort of 'lock' my wrist and it makes a crunching feeling. Sorry, not very good at explaining how it feels.

I'll be grateful for any advice.

Comments

  • butterflywings
    butterflywings Member Posts: 25
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi

    A friend of mine at work has arthritis and she had a work safety test done on her workstation through the occupational therapist. She now uses a mouse that is more pointed upwards than outwards, it's like a big egg shaped thing - looks fantastic, anyway the buttons you click are on the one side rather than on the top; she also has a raised keyboard to make it easier for her fingers.

    It's amazing what she has got. Obviously I'm not sure where your work place is but I'm pretty sure that they have to have some sort of health and safety or occupational therapist visitations on people that need assistance; maybe worth checking out with personnel.

    hope this helps x
  • doverliz
    doverliz Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for that. I work in a school so I should be able to get an assessment done through the Local Authority. That mouse sounds similar to the ones I was looking at but I hadn't realised that you can get a raised keyboard. I will certainly follow this up

    x
  • ladypea
    ladypea Member Posts: 25
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hiya

    I've had a workstation assessment done and just started the using the mouse you are referring to. It's called a trackerball. Great invention, so hopefully no more cramped fingers or stiff wrist for me :)

    ladypea
  • speedalong
    speedalong Member Posts: 3,272
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi,

    you don't have to pay for things in the workplace yourself.

    You need a occy health assessment to say you qualify under DDA and an assessment of what you need (ie an alternative to a mouse) by the disability advisor at the job centre ... Iris will explain it loads better than me.

    Speedalong
  • madwestie
    madwestie Member Posts: 383
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I had an assement done at work by abilitynet and they were able to bring me different mice and keyboards to try.
    I have a very large rollerball mouse which has the ability for me to plug extra buttons into it which i can operate with my other hand so i can split the strain evenly I also have a split keyboard which can be move to different angles.
    I was also recommened to have arm supports which clip onto my desk and cradle my forearms taking a lot of the strain from my arms.

    I hope you get something sorted out soon.
  • yoshimi
    yoshimi Member Posts: 20
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello,

    I have RA and work at a computer in an office. I have a RollerMouse Pro which my keyboard sits on, which means you don't have to reach across the desk to the mouse, and can use much ssmaller movements. It has a rollable bar which you can drag the pointer around the screen with. I have found it very usable. If you google the name you can see pictures of it. It takes a little getting used to but has the added bonus of confusing anyone else who trys to use your work station!

    Thanks,

    Sarah
  • cthornley
    cthornley Member Posts: 627
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    doverliz wrote:
    I work in an office mainly on the computer and it is becoming increasingly painful to use a mouse. Has anyone tried a differently shaped mouse? I have seen one online that you use with your hand at right angles to the desk but it is fairly expensive and I don't want to buy it unless I was fairly confident that it would help. I have RA and using a mouse seems to sort of 'lock' my wrist and it makes a crunching feeling. Sorry, not very good at explaining how it feels.

    I'll be grateful for any advice.

    I use a 3M ergonomic mouse (google it) and have done for 10yrs or so,(i'm on my 3rd one) its always helped reduce the pressure on my 'mouse' finger as it uses either my whole hand to click or my thumb (strongest joint) I have found it helps. It takes a while to get used to and it annoys the IT man at work so much when he fixes my PC that he has permanently got a regular mouse connected too and keeps it tucked out to the side. I do a lot of mouse work as i use my computer to draw as well as type and it can be very 'click' intensive but I can generally work a lot longer without pain with this mouse.

    i would suggest trying a few out if you can as its kinda personal preference - the local disability resource centre here has a few you can have a go with as does my OT at the hospital so see if there is anywhere you can have a go.

    good luck
  • doverliz
    doverliz Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for all your suggestions. I saw my consultant this week and he thinks that the pain I have in my hand and wrist is likely to be RSI on top of the RA and he has referred me for physiotherapy. At work, the Headteacher has sent off a referral to occupational health so I am going to wait to see what they suggest before I look into different mice (mouses? meece?).

    Thanks again
    Liz
    x
  • mummyb
    mummyb Member Posts: 1,231
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Liz, I had a workplace assessment and one directed by the job centre and was advied to have all sorts of special equipment. My mouse is called a quill mouse, your hand sits in it as though you are shaking hands with it and the clicker buttons are where the ends of your fngers are. Its very cmfortable and does not put any strain on finger or wrist joints at all. I can highly recommend it. However, if you have an access to work assessment they will show you different types to get the one that suits you best. I also got a lighter touch keyboard which is like a laptop keyboard, a special chair with neck support and lumbar support and a voice activated compouter programme Dragon its called, its fab. So i hope your assessment goes OK and you get the assistance you need. Good luck and best wishes, Brenda :):):)
  • carolanivey
    carolanivey Member Posts: 64
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Wow, these are all great suggestions! I use a laptop almost exclusively now, and I've gotten used to using the touch pad. But it wouldn't hurt to change things up once in a while to prevent carpal tunnel. I'll be looking into these devices!

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