How rude..

rachelj
rachelj Member Posts: 121
edited 18. Aug 2010, 05:49 in Say Hello Archive
There I am posting messages and not said 'ello! So Hello to you all, I am currently mid diagnosis, the GP has diagnosed me with seronegative RA and I am waiting to see the rheumatologist for an official confirmation.

I am fortunate as so far I only have had problems with my hands and wrists, but as the weeks go by picking up other aches and pains, fatigue and last week it was mouth ulcers.

I am so pleased I found you lot, I was feeling rather isolated not knowing anyone else with anything other than OA and having over 2 months to wait to see the consultant. At the grand old age of 28 I thought I was a bit of an anomaly for RA as many things I have read said its not until late 30's/40s it appears but I have seen there are sadly people younger with it and many my age. You are all a smashing bunch, upbeat, helpful and a good ear to bend. I hope I can help and advise others as much as I have had so far.

Hugs to you all

Rach

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello rachelj, I thought I recognised your name from the forums. It's not rude at all to not say hello, finding the different forums takes some navigation skills if one is new to all this posting malarkey!

    I agree, you are too young to be facing this horrible stuff, but arthritis can, and does, strike at any age. I began at 37, which I thought was bad enough, but I wasn't diagnosed until I was 46, by which time I'd really given up caring what it was! (I have PA, psoriatic arthritis). These are not easy condtitions to diagnose sometimes - I believe sero-negative is an arthritis reaction to an infection or virus - is that right? So when you catch a bug you get a bout of arthritis too - yes? Foul. You poor girl. Anyway, I'm glad you found us, you are not alone in this, and we'll do all we can to help and support. I hope you get to see the rheumatologist soon. DD
  • rachelj
    rachelj Member Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    From what I can tell the seronegative simply means that I don't have all the blood factors which make it RA. In general my condition will be less severe, which makes sense, my morning stiffness clears much sooner than those with RA.

    Some people start Seronegative and then the blood factors appear as the disease worsens and you end up with good old RA. Its a waiting game as to what it does. one oif my questions for the consultant is if they start me on the treatment now will it increase the chance of it not going to full blown RA.

    Roll on the 26th and some treatement!!
  • valval
    valval Member Posts: 14,911
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hi welcome glad to have you with us pop in cafe any time you need a natter val
  • cebeem
    cebeem Bots Posts: 472
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    rachelj wrote:
    From what I can tell the seronegative simply means that I don't have all the blood factors which make it RA. In general my condition will be less severe, which makes sense, my morning stiffness clears much sooner than those with RA.

    Some people start Seronegative and then the blood factors appear as the disease worsens and you end up with good old RA. Its a waiting game as to what it does. one oif my questions for the consultant is if they start me on the treatment now will it increase the chance of it not going to full blown RA.

    Roll on the 26th and some treatement!!

    Hi Rach
    My diagnosis is seronegative..started 10 weeks after the birth of my second child 2 years ago.
    Apparently pregnancy can trigger the onset of arthritis.
    I had flare ups over the years which generally ended with some fusing of my wrist or finger. Several times I went into remission and then it raised its head again.

    I take sulfasalasine and diclofenic sodium.
    The consultant told me it was a good sign that the rheumatoid marker was not in the blood...thats where the "negative "in the name comes into it.

    Mine has worsened recently but I think that age is begining to be a factor there!!!

    Appartently when in remission the sulfasalasine is continued at a lower dose (that didnt happen in the early days of my treatment)
    to keep things at bay....so hopefully with that new knowledge yours may never progress to full blown RA...mine continues to be Sero.

    Good luck keep us informed CB
    :lol:
  • cebeem
    cebeem Bots Posts: 472
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    cebeem wrote:
    rachelj wrote:
    From what I can tell the seronegative simply means that I don't have all the blood factors which make it RA. In general my condition will be less severe, which makes sense, my morning stiffness clears much sooner than those with RA.

    Some people start Seronegative and then the blood factors appear as the disease worsens and you end up with good old RA. Its a waiting game as to what it does. one oif my questions for the consultant is if they start me on the treatment now will it increase the chance of it not going to full blown RA.

    Roll on the 26th and some treatement!!

    Hi Rach
    My diagnosis is seronegative..started 10 weeks after the birth of my second child 25 years ago.
    Apparently pregnancy can trigger the onset of arthritis.
    I had flare ups over the years which generally ended with some fusing of my wrist or finger. Several times I went into remission and then it raised its head again.

    I take sulfasalasine and diclofenic sodium.
    The consultant told me it was a good sign that the rheumatoid marker was not in the blood...thats where the "negative "in the name comes into it.

    Mine has worsened recently but I think that age is begining to be a factor there!!!

    Appartently when in remission the sulfasalasine is continued at a lower dose (that didnt happen in the early days of my treatment)
    to keep things at bay....so hopefully with that new knowledge yours may never progress to full blown RA...mine continues to be Sero.

    Good luck keep us informed CB
    :lol:
  • cebeem
    cebeem Bots Posts: 472
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    cebeem wrote:
    rachelj wrote:
    From what I can tell the seronegative simply means that I don't have all the blood factors which make it RA. In general my condition will be less severe, which makes sense, my morning stiffness clears much sooner than those with RA.

    Some people start Seronegative and then the blood factors appear as the disease worsens and you end up with good old RA. Its a waiting game as to what it does. one oif my questions for the consultant is if they start me on the treatment now will it increase the chance of it not going to full blown RA.

    Roll on the 26th and some treatement!!

    Hi Rach
    My diagnosis is seronegative..started 10 weeks after the birth of my second child 2 years ago.
    Apparently pregnancy can trigger the onset of arthritis.
    I had flare ups over the years which generally ended with some fusing of my wrist or finger. Several times I went into remission and then it raised its head again.

    I take sulfasalasine and diclofenic sodium.
    The consultant told me it was a good sign that the rheumatoid marker was not in the blood...thats where the "negative "in the name comes into it.

    Mine has worsened recently but I think that age is begining to be a factor there!!!

    Appartently when in remission the sulfasalasine is continued at a lower dose (that didnt happen in the early days of my treatment)
    to keep things at bay....so hopefully with that new knowledge yours may never progress to full blown RA...mine continues to be Sero.

    Good luck keep us informed CB
    :lol:

    SHOULD SAY 25 YEARS AGO!!!! :)
  • tillytop
    tillytop Member Posts: 3,460
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Rachel - not sure if we have "spoken" on the other threads but welcome from me too!

    I too was twenty-eight when my RA was diagnosed too and apparently, all though not typical, it is not uncommon.

    you are in good company here and posting will hopefully make you feel less alone with this.

    Good luck with your appt on 26th. Hopefully the consultant will be able to get you on some meds which will give you some relief.

    Please do post an update to let us know how you get on.

    Love Tilly
  • janie68
    janie68 Member Posts: 1,186
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Rach

    Be rest assured treatment is much better these days & you will start it very soon. The prognosis is better than when I was diagnosed at 23, 15 years ago. All we had then was sulpha & mtx I think. Now there's loads. You will be fine once they find meds that work for you. Good luck
    Janie
  • rachelj
    rachelj Member Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Things are much much better these days. I was chatting to a lady yesterday, now in her late 80's, who used to be a physio therapist, in her time the common treatmeents for RA would be gold injections and applying 3rd degree burns to the affected joints :shock:

    Suddenly a bit of nausea, dizziness, appetite change seems more appealing!

    Rach
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Gold is still used. Perhaps it works. Probably not tho, nothing ever does. DD
  • tillytop
    tillytop Member Posts: 3,460
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Rach - I had gold injections for a while a few years ago, not sure how much they helped though and the injections were very painful. The 3rd degree burns sound terrifying though - YIKES!

    Tilly x

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