What have I let myself in for....?????

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minky67
minky67 Member Posts: 2,328
edited 26. Jan 2011, 07:29 in Living with Arthritis archive
Aw Lynn, I have know knowledge of the MTX or injecting.
I just wanted to send you hugs & hope it all goes well.
sending luv & loads more (((((hugs))))) debs

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  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    What have you let yourself in for? A measure of control and independence over what you do and when you do it. I began injecting meth before Christmas and I am now doing it at home. This is a radical departure for my hospital and we are still on slightly shaky ground re collection of meds and equipment, but so far so good. I am lucky in that I already had experience of mixing and injecting enbrel (which was twice weekly), and I have been doing the humira stabs since July 09, but there was an initial wobble with the meth - which didn't last long.

    Right, colly, you know me, plain spoken (but not unkind) - what caused the initial wobble was the fact that I could see the needle. (I can't with the humira pen) and I was out of practice with this. The needles are incredibly fine and not that long - they just look like 3 feet long railway girders when they are heading for a delicate part of one's anatomy. When the nurse was doing the meth stabbing every Wednesday morning, she would use my arm - convenience, ease of access etc and that stuff stung like a beggur, but now I am in control I use the vast steppe-like plains of my stomach and the stinging has diminished to virtually non-existent: there are fewer nerve endings in the stomach, you see, it makes a big difference.

    THIS FOLLOWING BIT IS TRUE. I cannot feel the needle when it's in. I honestly cannot. The worst bit is the psychological hurdle of knowing that you are going to stick something sharp into yourself - every instinct fights against that, initally, especially when you realise that you are not going to get some rewarding, blissful high from it. What you may gain is some relief of the ghastly symptoms of your arthritis, and that has to be a good thing.

    When I was trained for the enbrel administration (this was way back in summer 2006, I think) I pitched up at the hospital to find my rheumatology nurse fannying about with a couple of oranges, so that I could practise. I declined that option - why inject water into an orange? It won't feel like injecting me, so I just took a deep breath and got on with it. It was easy, it was just that first, initial 'I am going to do whaaaaaaaat to myself?' that was tricky, and on the plus side enbrel was twice weekly, I had to use four injection sites (stomach and thighs) and it quickly became routine. The meth is now routine - I have done 6 weeks' worth now, and it's fine. The one thing I cannot do tho is inject in my thighs - I just don't like it. Apparently it is better if one is sitting on a bed, with your legs out straight - the thigh is then not tense, as it is when you sit on the edge of a chair, or the bath, or whatever. I will give that a whirl one day, it's silly being reluctant over such a small thing. (I get very impatient with myself sometimes, that is a wonderful spur!)

    Remember, this IS a big deal and will take some getting used to but it frees you up from the absolute bind of pitching up at the docs or the hospital once a week for someone else to do what you can do for yourself. Should it turn out that you cannot do it, then at least you know you tried, which is always better than caving in without having a bash - well, that's what I think. Injected meth is usually a smaller dose than tablet meth - the liquid packs more 'punch' so to speak - I have 15ml, (which is a tiny amount compared to the humira) and it's over and done with in no time - two or three seconds, tops. I can do it when I want, not when someone else has decreed. This doesn't make me happy, as such, but it does make one aspect of this arthritis malarkey a little easier. I wish you well. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • julie47
    julie47 Member Posts: 6,041
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    morning collywobble
    just sending hugs ((((((())))))) and wish you luck when you go to the hosp to be shown how to inj the meth.
    take care and enjoy the weekend
    juliepf x
  • lindalegs
    lindalegs Member Posts: 5,393
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Lynn,

    Can't help with the injecting advice but my friend has her Mtx injections delivered, I don't know if this is normally the case.

    It's good to see you posting again :grin:

    Luv
    Love, Legs x
    'Make a life out of what you have, not what you're missing'
  • dorcas
    dorcas Member Posts: 3,516
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Lynn
    so good to see you posting :grin:

    You've had a busy time! but sounds very productive. What great advice about OT and Physio! I wasn't referred to either and it's only fairly recently that they've become part of my rheummy story too. :wink:

    I know what you mean about the 'elderly lodger' :roll: My house now looks as though I'm running a residential care home. :lol: But needs must and the equipment will be invaluable in helping you.

    I've been injecting Mtx for 3yrs and was injecting Humira too until I was taken off it. Anyway, the Mtx is by far the best to inject. Once you've done it once it gets easier. :grin: It's getting over the psychological barrier first time that is the most difficult part ...not the injection (if that makes sense!)

    You'll be shown where to inject.... thighs and tummy area and advised to 'rotate' injection sites. I find it much easier to inject in the tummy. It is NOT painful. Honestly!

    Good luck with it Lynn! there are a couple of other peeps on the forum about to start Mtx injections so you'll be in good company.

    Oh almost forgot.... I pick up my injections from the hospital pharmacy and usually get 8 at a time which is enough for two months.

    Iris xxx

    ps.. Mtx is easier to tolerate by injection that's why I'm on them.
  • chris7
    chris7 Bots Posts: 2,696
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh Lynnie :shock:

    So sorry lovey, I had no idea you had your appointment so soon and you went through all that with empty pockets!! :cry: You know I can't advise on this but know the good folks here already will help you through it. Glad to know you felt so supported at the appointment it must make such a difference, though am sorry it has now come to this. Hope the panic subsides soon for you and that you get some benefit from the physio too. Hope you are resting today. Hang in there.
    love and hugs ((( )))
    Chris
  • lizzie7ne
    lizzie7ne Member Posts: 154
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Lyn

    Re the injections, a week ago I was in the same position as you. If you look on page 2 of this forum you will see my post methotrexate injections - update. I was pretty scared at the thought as I am a bit scared of needes. However, I had one session with my Rheumatology Nurse who taught me how to inject - that was last week and I managed fine. The most positive thing to come out of it is I have been taking methotrexate by tablet form for two years with awful; side effects and the switch to injections produced no side effects other than a bit more tiredness the next day, so for me overcoming the psychological barrier of self injecting was well worth it.

    My methotrexate injections and sharps boxes etc are delivered to my home by a company called Home Care, they obtain the prescriptions direct from my Consultant. I am not sure what the procedure is throughout the country (I am in the north east).

    Yes I would echo what you say about seeing a Rheumy O.T. and Rheumy Physio, I was pretty lucky that I was referred to them by the Consultant the day he diagnosed RA. I dont know how I would have managed without my O.T, I was in such a bad way on diagnosis I could barely walk, couldnt get in the shower/bath, get up from the toilet, get down the step out of my home couldnt climb the stairs (my home had no stair rails), couldnt get dressed myself, couldnt even press my painkillers out of the packet and my O.T. was marvallous, he got me equipment for my home fairly quickly which gave me back my independence.

    Good luck with the methotrexate injections.

    lizzie
  • Wonkylegs
    Wonkylegs Member Posts: 3,504
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    HI Lynn

    well done for agreeing to have a stab :wink: at doing your own injections. I certainly hope that injecting will give you fewer side effects - it certainly made a world of difference to me when I changed from tablets to injections.

    All I can add to the replies above is that I receive my MTX in pre-filled syringes which are delivered to me every 8 week, along with everything else that is needed. If my dose is changed I sometimes have to go to the hospital to collect a small supply to tide me over until the new prescription can be dispensed and delivered.

    hopefully you will have no problems and will wonder why you every worried about it all!!

    good luck!
    WOnky xxxx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've just measured one: it's about 15 milimetres. And very, very thin. I do not feel it at all, that is the plain, unvarnished truth. Obviously the fewer nerves thing helps on that front! I shall be returning to the hospital on 16 Feb to collect my next sets of meth - Healthcare at Home deliver the humira every 12 weeks or so, I have to wait in for that and can lose a whole day. At least with the meth I can wander up to the hospital and fetch it, again I am in control. I wish you well, collywobble, I am sure you will be fine with it all. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • nanarose
    nanarose Member Posts: 117
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Lynn, well done for getting past the hurdle of injecting yourself.

    I cannot add any more than what's been said, re the injecting, except that I pick up my mtx jabs from the chemist as I have a repeat prescription from my GP, although it was organised through the hospital. :P

    I live in Scotland though, and I know we have different ways of doing things up here!

    My Rheumatology department has a very joined up service once you are diagnosed, in my case with PsA. I was sent to Podiatry, Physiotherapy and Occ Therapy within weeks.
    I have since finished with the physio, but once you are in the 'system' I can go back and see any of them without needing to go through a GP, nurse or Doctor, which is very comforting to know. They have been of immense help to me, and so, so nice and helpful.

    Keep up the good work with the stabbing, and I too think it's really quite an easy process, although I admit needles don't scare me!
    x
  • ironic
    ironic Member Posts: 2,361
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Lynn,
    Sorry I am late on this one. If you are not sure then have a couple done at the hospital and then go for it. It is a big step for you and like anything new getting over the first one is scary. I know where you are coming from with the needle thing. I hope that once you have it in your system you can have a lower dosage to give the same results.
    How are you doing with the new gadgets? It does make all the difference when the departments all work together. At lease you have all the contacts and telephone numbers now so that will make things easier.
    Thinking of you and I hope you get your dates through soon.
    Gentle hugs and good vibes,
    Lv, Ix
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,489
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Lynn

    I am so very sorry I missed your thread :oops:

    I am very proud of you for agreeing to try to inject your mtx - brave girl you are for sure :grin:

    I too have never had any support form the so-called team!! Having said that i do think I will ask if i think what I need will cost more than I can afford.

    I loved your 'elderly lodger' phrase :lol: thanks for making me laugh - I hope you soon get into using the bits and pieces and they really make life easier for you.

    Love

    Toni xx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have had my Mowbray toilet frame for years, I don't even think about it now. My mum asks me to put it away as she doesn't like seeing it in the bathroom but I politely ask two questions.

    1. Where? (It's pretty bulky.)
    2. Why? I cannot, I need it. (She doesn't like looking at it?)

    These things do help, they do make life easier, more comfortable, less stressful. But that doesn't mean that we have to like them. I wish you well with your gadgets. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • tkachev
    tkachev Member Posts: 8,332
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi everyone

    After a two hour long, rollercoaster of a session with the rheumatology OT yesterday (but ultimately a very productive session), I had a call from my rheumy nurse. OT had left a message for him, explaining that the sulfasalazine I was prescribed to take in combo with MTX, is having horrendous side effects. The upshot was, I have agreed to try injecting the MTX. I have to go to the hospital week after next, with a view to learning how to do the necessary. We are hoping that I might tolerate a higher dose of MTX via injection.

    I know lots of you brave people are injecting MTX, and I'm wondering how it all works, with regard to getting your prescriptions and so on. I know I will find out in time, but I like to know these things upfront - that way I can psyche myself up to a full blown panic attack when I get to the hospital :shock: :shock: :oops: Amazing what you'll agree to when needs must, isn't it? :roll: I may end up phoning on the day to say I can't make it....I'm busy washing my hair :lol:

    I have to say though, yesterday was the first time in almost 2 years, that for me, this elusive "team" we are told will support us when we're first diagnosed, actually became a reality. I have a great GP, and a lovely rheumy nurse, but often felt they just prescribe you meds and send you off home. The OT changed all that (she's also referring me to physio), and I want to say to anyone who hasn't been offered the services of OT or physio - PLEASE ASK for a referral. I wasn't even aware we had a rheumy OT, even though I was told yesterday I should have been referred as soon as I was diagnosed. It was only when I'd asked about perching stools that I ended up being referred to OT, and got an appointment very quickly.

    I realise many of you are already lucky enough to have access to these services, but it does vary, depending where you live. So don't lose heart if you feel you need extra help - I've learned a valuable lesson - the help is out there, but you may need to ask for it!

    Sorry for the long winded post. It's been an emotional day, and to be honest, I'm still looking at the bits of equipment I was given by OT, as if they don't belong to me :roll: Have we taken an elderly lodger in?????????? :oops:

    I think I agreed to the MTX injections because I was a bit of a wreck when the nurse rang, so any hints and tips, reassurances, would be welcomed.

    Take care,
    Lynn xx

    So glad you had a good appt with the OT. You do have to ask for things sometimes. It was only reading this forum that I knew I could ask for anti-sickness pills. I mean I've told my Rheummy nurse and consultant how sick I have felt for years and they never mentioned the anti-sickness pills yet they have been a life saver. I have only had one slight sick bout since early September(although I have been off MTX quire often so that helps too).
    I tried the MTX injections in 2009 and they didn't work for me. It is quite a lot of preparation too because you have to handle the MTX carefully. I also worried about my children getting hold of it whereas the pills fit neatly into a locked drawyer. IF they had made me feel less sick then I definately would have carried on with them but they made me feel worse.
    They inject you first few visits to see if it has the desired effect and they go through everything thouroughly so don't worry. You can then decide if it is worth it. Please don't rush into a decision, make sure you feel better first.
    I hope it does work for you as it does for many on here. That nausea is a b*mmer and takes up valuable time and energy.

    Hope that helps
    Elizabeth x (love the rice krispies suggestion).
    Never be bullied into silence.
    Never allow yourself to be made a victim.
    Accept no ones definition of your life

    Define yourself........

    Harvey Fierstein
  • tkachev
    tkachev Member Posts: 8,332
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I tried the injections just before my THR in 2009. I had to come off MTX and humira for the operation anyway and as the injections didn't make me feel any better and because of the children I decided against it.
    I keep my mtx tabs in an underwear drawyer tee hee.

    Elizabeth
    Never be bullied into silence.
    Never allow yourself to be made a victim.
    Accept no ones definition of your life

    Define yourself........

    Harvey Fierstein
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    collywobble, I bought a clear plastic storage box, with a clip and lock system. It is big enough to store the meth syringes, the needles, some plasters (I rarely need those) and a few pairs of gloves. That is kept in the airing cupboard, together with the special sharps bin the hospital supplied. Our airing cupboard is not a warm place. The humira I have has to be kept in the fridge, but I was advised that the meth was OK at or below room temperature. How much are you getting in one go? I only appear to get enough for four weeks but as I said my hospital is new to this! DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben