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How do we put it all together

cmd104cmd104 Posts: 18
edited 12. Dec 2011, 16:20 in Living with Arthritis archive
First of all, just to say a proper hello.I've recently signed up here, and have been overwhelmed by the knowledge people have and the support they give.

How do we put it altogher? By this I mean, over the years, I've seen various people about various problems. Psoriatic arthritis diagnosed long time ago affecting mainly hands, but now I suspect its in the feet as well as they're always sore and I have the expected problems with pitted/fungal nails.

But, as a result of a work related accident a number of years ago, I had my spine x-rayed the outcome was that the radiologist said that the bone density of my spine is lower than they would expect for someone of my age.... I was 20 at the time.

Osteochondritis dissecans in right knee cap, which apparently is more unusual than having it elsewhere in the knee joint, and have had 3 ops to help with it.
I've had a lot of back problems potentially caused by fallen arches, though some recent visits to a chiropractor highlighted that my pelvis was out of alignment, confirmed by an x-ray. So chiropractor has helped 100% with back.

My question really is, how do we put all of this together, GPs dont seem to have the time nor the inclination to dive deeper other than what's currently the problem.

Partly my fault, as I don't take meds for PA and havent been near a rheumatologist in 5+ years. So when I do go in anything i say is in isolation. At this point in time the very centre of my hands and feet are sore. I will go to GP who might do a blood test which wont show anything. Wont look at nails on hands/ feet and give me something for the pain and off i'll go. If i need to go about my back, the fact that the bone density is what it should be won't be any concern...

Sorry I'm ranting here, and in comparison to how all of you cope with nasty uncle Arthur, I should shut up....

Comments

  • valvalvalval Posts: 15,897
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    firstly welcome and you should not shut up but i do feel it might be time to go back to rhummy to see what help is availible now that was not before and they will look at the whole package and let you know what arther and what not at least you will know where you are good luck val
    val
  • elnafinnelnafinn Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi CMD

    As Val suggests it may be a good idea to be referred to a rheumi. You cannot really expect your gp to take all this on board.

    Perhaps when you have an appointment you could write your history down using bullet points for easier reading along with dates, for the rheumi to digest, or even send it to him prior to your appointment date.

    I am not sure if a pain clinic referral would help you atm. I have oa so do not see a rheumi.

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Why should you shut up? I have read your history (or the parts you have shared with us) and I must admit I have wondered if the 'ostrich' approach to things is being employed: there's nowt wrong with that apart from the fact that the 'If I ignore it it will go away.' approach works for nothing, be it illness, debt, a bully at work, a parking ticket, itching in a personal area - :oops: - , the smell at the bottom of the fridge - you get my drift.

    Sometimes I think I have drawn it all together and that I am coping just fine, but the actual truth is I am a swan, elegantly floating on the arthritic pond of life but, when I want to get from A to B there is frantic - and unseen - action. My GP has her uses but not for the PA so please don't expect yours to cover it, in my experience that kinda stuff is way beyond their knowledge. Western medicine tends not to look at the whole, just the specialism of the expert you are seeing. My PA has led to OA and flat feet, and now possibly plantar fasciitis (I accept that the latter two could have occurred anyway regardless of arthritis) but what the hell: I will see who I need to see but I realise the common link between the 'experts' is me. I have to tell 'em what's happening and I do, but it's taken a while for me to get to grips with that. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think you'll find, cmd, that, if you ask your GP to refer you to a rheumatologist again, it will all start to come together. PA is an auto- immune disease and GPs don't do much for them - it's the rheumatologists who prescribe usually. If you've been dealing with everything - or, maybe, not dealing with it - on a bit-by-bit basis, it will seem like a big muddle. The first step to sorting it out is to ask to see a rheumatologist. I hope it goes well for you.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • cmd104cmd104 Posts: 18
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Can you ask a GP to refer you on to a rheumi? The only decent GP I had was when I was at university, the guy was genuinely interested in trying to help me. Most of the ones i've seen in the 8 years since leaving always give the impression that you're interrupting their day when you go in to see them. I'll be making an appointment to try and get in with the Rheumi!

    I geniunely didnt realise that this was sort of outside of the scope for a GP. And on re-reading my original post, I should say change "partly my fault" to entirely my fault nobody else made me do it :smile:
  • elnafinnelnafinn Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Yes, you can ask your GP to refer you to a rheumy. You should not be made to feel that you are wasting the gps time when you have an appointment with them. We keep the gps in a job, try to remember that when you next visit. :wink: We do not go and see our GPs for fun either. Your gp should have referred you. I wish you all the best when you next see your gp. Be firm and please do not let him fob you off without good reason.

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think you should definitely see a rheumatologist, if only to confirm this diagnosis of PA. If it was made by the GP then that is very unusual as it is rheumatologists who deal with auto-immune arthritis, not GPs. Let us know how you get on, please. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • cmd104cmd104 Posts: 18
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I've been to GP, waiting for bloods and Xray then he'll says we'll take it from there. I explained that I haven't been managing Psooriatic Arthritis since diagnosis and now hands and feet we're getting sore all the time.... i'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for all your help!
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