driving

gezzas
gezzas Member Posts: 18
i am not sure if you can give me any advice i have had RA for 32 years i have had shoulders replaced but on each occasion was able to get back driving normally since august 11 i have taken a turn for the worse and have been unable to drive due to not being able to raise my left shoulder to do steering wheel and indicators i have now realised that this will not get better and want to inform the DVLA about my condition but my concerns are do i say i developed RA in 1981 or the point when it started to effect my ability to drive. i am looking to try and get a modified car if DVLA let me keep licence but need to no what to say regards dates hope you can offer some advice thanks.

Comments

  • lululu
    lululu Member Posts: 486
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Gezzas
    This is interesting to me I have not come across this one. If it were me I think if I wanted to carry on driving with an adapted car then I would ask motobility for advice, they will have seen it all before and wil give honest impatial advice.

    On the other hand if I did not want to carry on driving then I would just consult DVLA. I advise you to dip your toe in before jumping in at the deep end just incase. As you are not driving now then it can do no harm to check out all the possible outcomes.

    I am considering an adapted car at the moment so will watch to see what you do. Best wishes.
  • helpline_team
    helpline_team Posts: 2,787
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Dear Gezzas,

    Welcome to Chat to Helplines. If your shoulders are making driving not possible right now then that must be so very difficult for you. The car can be a real lifeline for your independence. What people often do is talk things over with their GP and take the their guidance before deciding about DVLA. Mostly the DVLA are interested in safety - i.e. can someone manoevre the car and stop in an emergency. A key arthritis issue is not driving if affected by strong medication which affects awareness.

    If you are not driving then you may want to explore adaptions first to see if they might enable you to drive. The organisation Ricability has some excellent information about what's available - a joystick can replace the steering wheel for example.
    http://www.ricability.org.uk/consumer_reports/mobility_reports/car_controls/
    A first point of call is often to a Mobility centre where you can be assessed to see what your needs are.
    http://www.mobility-centres.org.uk/

    I hope this is helpful - please private message us with your postal address if you'd like us to send you any more information, or ring us if you'd like some support and to talk.

    Guy
  • lululu
    lululu Member Posts: 486
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi again Gezzers
    I have just looked at the Government website (sorry)I don;t know how to post a link but it says -- if you use adaptions to drive then you need to tell DVLA if you do not use adaptions then you do not need to tell them. If you do decide to tell them anything then there are forms on the Directgov site.
  • gezzas
    gezzas Member Posts: 18
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the advice i have now contacted dvla they advised i download a form and then send a covering letter to explain my condition and how it affects me it will then be a 3 week wait to see if they think i can keep my licence or send me for an assessment. I have also checked out sites suggested and it looks possible i may still be able to drive
  • lululu
    lululu Member Posts: 486
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Gezzers. People without arms are able to drive with the right conversions (I know one), so I do noe see how DVL could possibly say you are not able to drive.

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