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Injection advice

KarenOKarenO Posts: 4
edited 30. Aug 2012, 10:57 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hello to all, it is my first time here so please bear with me. I have recently been diagnosed with osteo arthritis in my neck c2-c7. I find that I am in constant pain, it starts with a tingling then a burning sensation then full blown pain. My problem is I can do everyday tasks, it's when I stop is the problem, that's when the pain starts. I am currently taking gabapentin dyhydrocodine and diazapam. My physiotherapist today has strapped my right arm in a soft sling to stop the weight of my arm pulling on my neck and she has sent a referral for pain injections. Can anyone please give me some advice, on these injections.

Comments

  • NumptydumptyNumptydumpty Posts: 6,494
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi KarenO,
    welcome to the forum.
    I'm afraid I can't help,(I have RA). I just wanted to say hello.
    I'm sure someone better informed than me will be along soon.
    Wishing you well,
    Numpty
  • KarenOKarenO Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Numpty,
    Thank you for the welcome message.
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello KarenO and welcome from me too. If by injections you mean steroid injections I've had a few but not in my neck. I think there are people on here though who have had them in their necks and I hope they are around soon.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello and welcome from me too, it's nice to meet you. I cannot help either as the only injections I have had which were meant to relieve pain were steroid ones (both in my behind and directly into my knee and ankle joints) and they didn't do much. I use good, old-fashioned pain dullers (and not too many either) as pain is very much a fact of my life but I am fortunate in that my neck is not affected. To which department has the physio referred you, do you know? My best guess is the pain clinic. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • frogmellafrogmella Posts: 1,115
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi KarenO,

    I have arthritis in my lumbar spine, so different to yours but also kinda the same! I had injections into my facet joint and epidural space at the end of May. They worked a treat. I had about two weeks afterwards where they were building up and then had two fabulous months! I am now back on the downward slope but those two months this summer were brilliant.

    I note that you say you can do everyday tasks but suffer afterwards. That is true with me to some extent. I know it is difficult but you have to try and learn your limitations. I have found that waiting until I actually hurt to stop doing something is way too late. Similarly I can get on with something fine but then hurt like heck later. I think pacing is the key. I know it is difficult. People always say "listen to your body" but that is no use when your body waits until later to shout at you that "that was too much"!!!! I have learnt, through trial and painful error my new limitations.

    Anyway, I wish you luck and feel free to ask me anything!
    Helen x
  • Soretoe2Soretoe2 Posts: 198
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Karen,
    I have had eight epidurals and more than twenty steroid injections into my cervical spine over a period of about 18 years.
    In my area the epidurals are usually done in a face down position, by having your face looking at the floor through a large rubber type donut.
    The injections are usually face up and you have an anaesthetic but not a knock out one, so you are awake but don't feel pain, just a bit of 'pulling'.
    The surgeon has an xray/scan type monitor which you are connected uo to. This enables him to get the needle in exactly the right place.
    You have a dressing on the site of entry. Afterwards here they give you tea and toast, you stay for a couple of hours and then go home. It's done as day surgery.
    The epidurals take a bit more recovery time than the injections. You are usually quite sore for a few days.
    How much pain relief you get really depends on you and how bad your condition is. Some people have relief for months, some have none at all.
    I have had both reactions.
    If you have up to about 6 there are usually no complicatiions. You will know by a couple whether they benefit you or not.
    However if you end up having lots the steroid builds up in your system.
    I had so many because I begged my consultant to keep me going while my sons were still at home. He warned me several times I was having a few too many but was very kind and gave me the benefit of the doubt.
    I now have a reduced functioning liver because of too many steroids.
    I must point out though that I have also had many courses of oral steroids throughout my life as well.
    So now I can't have any more, but my sons have flown the nest and I have accepted my disabilities and to an extent my pain.
    So give them a try and see how you get on. You may find that you are one of the people who really benefit from them.
    So sorry you have these problems. It's an awful thing to live with.
    I always say the blueprint for the human race had too many flaws in it to get passed today!Best wishes to you. Joy
  • KarenOKarenO Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you all for your response to my questions, I think the injections are the ones that Joy spoke about as my physio mentioned an X-ray monitor and coining home afterwards. However, she also told me that these injections have a 99% success rate, but after speaking to my GP today he has told me not to build my hopes up too much as they don't always work, confusion again! I just wonder now if there will ever be any relief, walk and I am in pain afterwards, can't sit on a kitchen type chair, pain afterwards, housework, pain afterwards, basically pain after everything I do. That's my complaining done for today. Once again thanks.
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    We all have constant pain in varying degrees and yes, it is very difficult to live with. If you do have steroid jabs then make sure you rest properly afterwards to give them the best chance of kicking in - they don't work immediately. Good luck and I hope they help you. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can only echo what DD has written. These things do require a period of rest afterwards though quite how one rests one's neck I'm not sure :roll: At the end of the day, though, pain is always there with arthritis and the meds only take the edge off it. I dread to think of the amount of narcotics I'd be swallowing if I aimed for none at all. Good luck.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
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