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Diclofenac and mood swings anyone ?

SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
edited 2. Sep 2012, 11:57 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi - I'm experiencing some very bad, really low moods at the moment. At first I put it down to being post minor surgery last week and waiting for biopsy results but now I'm beginning to wonder if it is the diclofenac.

I missed out on taking it for a couple of days as I had some bruising and didn't want to aggravate it, my mood was quiet but ok and certainly positive that all will be well, then back on the diclofenac yesterday and weeping hit big style and really struggling to be in control, feeling faint and dizzy too.

Just wondering if anyone else has experienced this.

Thanks, Sue
Fiddlersmall.jpg
Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009

Comments

  • dachshunddachshund Posts: 7,796 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Sue
    i have taken diclofenac for 2 years and i've missed one mine go in water and when i go to town i dont like to stain other peoples cups as some times mine are pink. i have not had any side affects.
    take care
    joan xx
    take care
    joan xx
  • HelenbothkneesHelenbothknees Posts: 487
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have horrible mental side effects with all the anti-inflammatories I've tried - diclofenac, iboprofen, and especially naproxin. I only took diclofenac for a week once for a hand infection, but I was feeling very strange by the time I stopped. I took iboprofen for months, and never connected it with the anxiety, depression, and mood swings, which had my GP wanting to put me on antidepressants, but I just knew it wasn't that. Then I tried naproxin for my arthritis, and had a couple of major panic attacks, and I mean major! Never had anything like that before. My GP said all anti-inflammatories were related, marked on my records that I was severely allergic to them, and all was OK till I allowed myself to be persuaded to have a short course of ibuprofen after my TKR. OK for four days, then had another very nasty panic attack.

    So yes, same as you, though differing in detail, I'd say. A nurse friend says anti-inflammatories are known to have mental effects as a side effect. I'd say that could possibly be what's causing your problems.
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    thank you so much Helenbothknees (love the name) !

    I am so relieved to hear you say that. I've had bouts of depression before but this is totally different and, as you say, I think you know when it's related to a drug you've taken. I feel disconnected from things, and am doing odd things even for me!!! For instance I was in a shop this morning and couldn't find money in my purse (thank goodness for credit cards!), when I got home I sorted through my bag and eventually found the money in my glasses case. I can't concentrate and as I say, the low mood is dreadful and on both days has come on within an hour of taking Diclofenac, along with light headedness and breathlessness.

    I think I may ask my GP if I can try a lower doseage to see if that makes any difference - I guess it's a fine line between pain relief (which they do bring) and unpleasant side effects. On balance I think I'd rather smile and feel in control again !! :)

    Thanks again Helen

    Sue
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • HelenbothkneesHelenbothknees Posts: 487
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi again Sue,
    Yeah, disconnected from things...now you mention it, I think that's what diclofenac did to me too. I knew I was only going to take it for a few days, so I put up with it, but it was very weird. Like you (and most of us, I think), I'd rather have pain and be in control. Yes, try a lower dosage, or maybe ask to try something else; I would.
    Helen
  • barbara12barbara12 Posts: 20,903 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Sue
    I have only recently realized that the diclos make me really jumpy ,the slightest things makes me jump out of my skin..not sure about the mood swings will have to ask my hubby about them, but also I am so forgetful but I put this down to the amitryptalines.
    Love
    Barbara
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    "Hi again Sue,
    Yeah, disconnected from things...now you mention it, I think that's what diclofenac did to me too. I knew I was only going to take it for a few days, so I put up with it, but it was very weird. Like you (and most of us, I think), I'd rather have pain and be in control. Yes, try a lower dosage, or maybe ask to try something else; I would.
    Helen"

    It's such a relief to know this is/has happened to others, thought I was loosing my marbles (more than usual) :lol:

    Will see my GP next week about a reduced dosage.

    Thanks again Helen
    Sue
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    [quoteHi Sue
    I have only recently realized that the diclos make me really jumpy ,the slightest things makes me jump out of my skin..not sure about the mood swings will have to ask my hubby about them, but also I am so forgetful but I put this down to the amitryptalines.][/quote]

    Hi Barbara

    yes, now you come to mention it, maybe not so jumpy but certainly intolerant of noise - was shopping with our granddaughter the other day and by the time we got back to the car I was screaming inside - could hardly wait to be somewhere where I could be quiet, thank goodness my lovely hubby was with us and he was driving :)

    take care
    Sue
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • earthspiritearthspirit Posts: 278
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    ive been taking diclofenac for a few years. i did stop taking them after i went to doctor with chest pains - i thought i had either heart disease or angina symptoms of some sort. it was very painful. took my breath away and giving me many concerns, not least that each time i felt this, i was about to have heart attack.

    after much investigation i was told this was reflux, even tho i had no acid at back of throat and no real stomach problems.

    i couldnt manage without them tho and after a couple months off and a slight lessening of the "chest " symptoms, i went back on them but this time taking lansoprosole (stomach protector) and the "chest" symptoms are still there, but not so bad.

    lansoprosole and all those other things hurt my stomach a bit and trudle through my instestines a bit painfully. those pills may protect your stomach but they are not good for the digestive system as they are suppressing natural substances produced by stomach which enables food to be correctly digested and our bodies gain the nutrients from what we eat.

    its all bad stuff - the body does not want all these drugs, but sadly science medicine and pharmacueticals arent geared up to be kind to us yet.

    we must suffer in taking our cures

    diclofenac as never given me any of the things some of you seem to have experienced/are now experiencing. they are to my knowledge an antiinflamatory and that is all they do for me. no effects of any other sort except for what they do to your stomach.

    if you are experiencing those sort of mental problems you should try to do some computer research yourself and find out maybe why and then go to your doctor and discuss this.

    i dont think that there are any other pills which work effectively like diclofenac in reducing inflamation. they are not pain killers but you get rid of pain when the inflamation goes.

    long term use, like ibuprofen, will dry out the joints eventually. i think taking ibuprofen for over 10 years has made my RA a bit worse. i think this is where we are meant to take glucosamine, to allow the joints to retain or regain the moisture they are losing with the anti- inflamatories

    see as i keep saying.....all these pills are not good for us.

    hope i cheered you up a bit reading all of that.
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I've not had that trouble with diclofenac but then I don't take it often. There are other anti-inflammatories which may be worth a go, naproxen is one, Celebrex another, there's also hydroxy and planquenil (I think they come into that category but I've never been given them). I loved Celebrex as it actually did what was promised but I was taken off that by my GP due to its cost. The nap did nowt for me but does work well for others. Finding a med that suits is a matter of trial and error and diclo doesn't sound too good for you. Have a chat to your GP, he's the best-placed to help. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you everyone for your very valuable feedback. I've decided to take the lower dosage of diclo that you can buy over the counter, until I can get to talk to my GP about trying something that perhaps won't have such an adverse effect on my mood and tummy too.
    I've also started taking Turmeric in the meanwhile to see if that helps reduce the inflamation any.
    I was out last evening with a couple of friends, both of whom have RA, so I consider myself very lucky only to have to deal with OA which, thankfully, at the moment is confined to my knees and big toe!
    Can I just say too, that without this forum to come and visit I would feel quite lost in terms of having somewhere to come, I'm fairly new at arthritis and your experience, and sense of humour and optimism, is invaluable - Thank you guys :D
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Anti-inflammatories are renowned for being rough on the guts, they are usually prescribed with a stomach protector such as omeprazole or lanzoprazole. Make sure you ask your GP about these meds too, OK? DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Anti-inflammatories are renowned for being rough on the guts, they are usually prescribed with a stomach protector such as omeprazole or lanzoprazole. Make sure you ask your GP about these meds too, OK? DD

    Thanks DD - I'm on Lanzoprazole so tummy is well protected but it still get mild nausea. I think I'm chasing the almost impossible dream of having max pain control with minimum drug intervention :lol:

    Sue
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh, sorry, I must have missed that detail :oops: , I've been a bit off-colour myself. I have learned over the years that the pain is a fact of life, you can dull the sharper edges but it remains. I stay on minimum pain relief for that reason, and it means that if things get wildly out of hand I can then turn to the much stronger stuff and actually feel a difference. :wink: My all-time favourite method of pain relief is general anaesthetic but that, alas, renders one useless. :lol: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • SuestpetersSuestpeters Posts: 94
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh, sorry, I must have missed that detail , I've been a bit off-colour myself. I have learned over the years that the pain is a fact of life, you can dull the sharper edges but it remains. I stay on minimum pain relief for that reason, and it means that if things get wildly out of hand I can then turn to the much stronger stuff and actually feel a difference. My all-time favourite method of pain relief is general anaesthetic but that, alas, renders one useless. DD

    Oh bless you, I have to agree with the general aneasthetic thing, I'm hopeless without sleep :lol:
    I like your approach to pain relief, mine also has to be a balancing act, i worry about tomorrow if what I take today becomes useless through overuse - I think I am my doctors worse nightmare :lol:
    Fiddlersmall.jpg
    Fiddler, my lovely boy for 28 glorious years : 1981-2009
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I don't worry about the morrow simply because I know it will be just as rubbish as today. :wink: I've been in pain for the last fifteen years, some days it's worse, some days it's easier but I know it's going to be there no matter what. The only people who can really help us are ourselves, the docs can supply meds of varying usefulness but mostly it's down to us to cope as best we can and everyone has their own way of doing just that. Arthritis is a complicated business at times! :lol: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
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