Light at the end of the tunnel for this father of two boys

elnafinn
elnafinn Member Posts: 7,412
edited 23. Nov 2012, 10:08 in Living with Arthritis archive
The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,686
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Maybe I just got out of bed the wrong side this morning but I find this article annoying, sloppily written, disturbing and patronising.

    I cannot believe that anyone in their 30s, who has had any form of arthritis for 20 years (note the general term ‘arthritis’, no specific type mentioned), has, after being unable ever to have a kick-about in the garden or tie his shoelaces as a result of that arthritis, then recovered all that movement simply as a result of exercise. (And I’m one that’s always banging on about the need for exercise :x )

    A more accurate report would have said that the man, as a result of obesity and depression (which possibly started after a diagnosis of arthritis), had become unable to do these things and exercise had enable him to recover the ability.

    The impression given is that we arthritics are a lazy bunch of fat slobs who only need to get off our backsides in order to recover. I’ve had RA since I was 15, never been overweight, always played footie and cricket in the garden with my sons and still, amazingly, continue to get more arthritic. Where am I going wrong? (Signed - a distinctly narky SW :mrgreen: )
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • lazicat
    lazicat Member Posts: 177
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Articles like this are not helpful at all. If this was the case Im sure it would of been discovered a very long time ago & we would all be fit & well. Im sure exercise does help, but not a miracle cure !
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,280
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for that Elna, it just goes to show there is some form of exercise for all of us.....but we need to be careful that the trainer is highly experience..maybe the NHS should be looking at this instead of just physio.
    Love
    Barbara
  • rockchick
    rockchick Member Posts: 58
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I thought it was rather uplifting to read. It doesn't state he's been cured, just on less medication, and he obviously feels better about himself and life in general. He took control, albeit after a long time, and admitted he needed help. He apparently got the right help for his needs. He's been doing this for 8 months - so not a five minute wonder cure. He's still on medication. And okay he lost 2 stone. Good for him. Medication and depression can do that to you, it doesn't mean he was obese to begin with though.

    There are hundreds of different forms of musculo-skeletal conditions, which are lumped together under the arthritis heading. Hell, the experts don't even know what we've got at times. The press certainly won't know. Mr Lever may not even know.

    If this article gets one person to take notice, and get some help, it's done it's job.
  • phoenixoxo
    phoenixoxo Member Posts: 625
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi people,

    I've read the article. Postcode Gazette seems to be a general news site, so I didn't expect in-depth reporting. However, it does worry me that Arthritis Care has posted a link on its Facebook page. Yes, 18 people (so far) have liked the story, but that may well be 18 people subscribing to arthritis-lite. Arrrgh. :mrgreen:

    Best wishes,
    Phoebe
    PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and other things since 1990. Happy to help when I can :-)
  • elnafinn
    elnafinn Member Posts: 7,412
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    barbara12 wrote:
    Thanks for that Elna, it just goes to show there is some form of exercise for all of us.....but we need to be careful that the trainer is highly experience..maybe the NHS should be looking at this instead of just physio.

    Hi Barbara

    I was happy for this father of two who had been helped by good specialist with the right idea of how to treat him and also his great instructor. I am sure his depression gradually lifting went a long way towards helping him feel better in himself both mentally and physically. There should be more of this type of help offered to patients.

    Elna x
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • elnafinn
    elnafinn Member Posts: 7,412
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    rockchick wrote:
    I thought it was rather uplifting to read. It doesn't state he's been cured, just on less medication, and he obviously feels better about himself and life in general. He took control, albeit after a long time, and admitted he needed help. He apparently got the right help for his needs. He's been doing this for 8 months - so not a five minute wonder cure. He's still on medication. And okay he lost 2 stone. Good for him. Medication and depression can do that to you, it doesn't mean he was obese to begin with though.

    There are hundreds of different forms of musculo-skeletal conditions, which are lumped together under the arthritis heading. Hell, the experts don't even know what we've got at times. The press certainly won't know. Mr Lever may not even know.

    If this article gets one person to take notice, and get some help, it's done it's job.

    Elna likes this. :) Having a good specialist and instructor is a huge bonus.They sometimes seem few and far between. I felt happy for this dad of two and his achievements.
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • dachshund
    dachshund Member Posts: 8,866
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Elna
    i've enjoyed exercise all my life i walked my dog i had my own horse.
    then i got arther i went to the gym for 5 years but i had to stop the aching in my body and legs no energy i have to do things and then sit down i feel lasey i still enjoy my life but its slower now.
    take care all.
    joan xx
    take care
    joan xx
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,280
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    elnafinn wrote:
    barbara12 wrote:
    Thanks for that Elna, it just goes to show there is some form of exercise for all of us.....but we need to be careful that the trainer is highly experience..maybe the NHS should be looking at this instead of just physio.

    Hi Barbara

    I was happy for this father of two who had been helped by good specialist with the right idea of how to treat him and also his great instructor. I am sure his depression gradually lifting went a long way towards helping him feel better in himself both mentally and physically. There should be more of this type of help offered to patients.

    Elna x
    Hi Elna
    I didnt think of the depression, like you say once his depression lifted it would help his health, and there is nothing better than exercise for depression, at the min the only parts I can exercise are my arms, but I feel so much better knowing I am doing something.
    I did get hooked on exercise when I went to the gym...maybe I overdid things... :roll:
    Hope you are keeping well xxx
    Love
    Barbara