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Alternative to THR?

scribblerscribbler Posts: 54
Can you advise me if there are any alternative treatments to THR for arthritis of the hip? From what I have read and been told by the hospital after a THR the amount of movement in the leg is very limited and you are advised not to raise your knee above 90 degrees to the horizontal.

I wonder if there are any less drastic treatments available or any research going on into an op that will allow a full range of movement after a hip replacement.

I ride a recumbent trike and my consultant couldn't guarantee that I would be able to continue riding after a THR.

There seem to be new developments all the time in orthopaedic surgery and I live in hopes that in a few years time there might be a better alternative than having a chunk of bone replaced by a lump of plastic! Am I being over-optimistic?

Many thanks

Comments

  • maria09maria09 Posts: 1,905
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    Things may have changed since I worked nearly 2years ago on an orthopaedic ward did work there for abt 20 years but there is no other option than having a hip replacement some times they offer a hip resurfacing but that's only a temporary measure and not always pain free afterwards and you will need to have a hip replacement eventually
    Yes the are making progress with this replacements but so far there isn't on that can do everything your own hip joint can do as there is always a possibility of dislocation which if you don't take great care of your hip replacement is common that's why they have the rules
    If your hip is so bad and is so painful there's no choice you need a hip replacement
    Might be worth looking into changing your tyke rather that waiting for the restrictions for hip replacement to change
    I know it might sound harsh but that's the reality
    Best wishes
    Maria
  • scribblerscribbler Posts: 54
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Many thanks, Maria for your comments. At least now I can be reasonably sure there I'm not missing out on some new technique that might have done a better job than the op I was offered.
    I'm prepared to carry on as I am at present - getting around reasonably, riding my trike and taking pain-killers as needed.
    A decision to have a THR operation is not reversible. But in 5 or 10 years' time I might feel differently, who knows?

    :)
  • maria09maria09 Posts: 1,905
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    I'm glad I was of some help
    It you can cope with the pain and the damage to your hip joint isn't so far gone that there is no other choice than hip replacement then I agree to put it off for now but that's my own personal view but not a professional view as I've been out of it for awhile so can really only give you my view
    I know technology changes all the time so who knows what's next
    Good luck for the future
    Maria
  • helpline_teamhelpline_team Posts: 1,935
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Dear Scribbler,

    Thank you for your post to Helplines. I'm afraid that factual technical questions are not always easy for us to reply quickly to. In the case of your conundrum we'd not be able to be categoric. The general information on total hip replacement is very clear about the 90 degree bend and especially the risks of low seating.

    You might need to get some medical wider views on the practicalities of different kinds of bikes and arthritis - physiotherapists and members of surgical teams would probably be the best ones to seek out.

    The medical opinions you seek out can also help you make an informed decision about the condition of the affected joints - and the risks/benefits of different decisions.

    Because on the Helpline we are not medically qualified we can't always interpret the information to fit enquiries that are less common.

    If you'd like some further information, or perhaps a chat about how this is all going, please give us a ring our free phone or email us your name and address if you'd like us to post you some information.

    kind regards

    Guy
  • scribblerscribbler Posts: 54
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Many thanks, Guy for your comments. I'll take note of them.
    All very helpful.
    My current decision is not to go for a THR op. I'd have a major operation, a long recovery period and end up with less independent mobility than I have at present, if I lost the use of my recumbent trike, my main means of getting around. I don't drive and my balance isn't good so I don't want to go back to 2 wheels after the delights of 3!

    It might not be the best decision, but at least I can change my mind if it doesn't work for me.
    Thanks again .

    :)
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It's been years since I last cycled (and I won't ever again thanks to widespread arthritis of both kinds) but I wonder if a sit-up-and-beg tricycle might be a possibility? I know from my reading on here that the recovery from a THR can be a long road but, if one is disciplined and sensible, it can result in a pain-free and more mobile life. Surely that is a good benefit at the cost of a few more difficult and restricted months? I wish you well. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • scribblerscribbler Posts: 54
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Many thanks DD for your comments. A point about trikes that many people, even cyclists don't realise is that the technique for riding an upright trike is very different from a bike. Recumbents are a different kettle of fish. An upright trike is I suppose a possibility as a last resort. But I don't want to have to learn a new skill at this stage and there is also the question of cost.

    You mention "a few restricted months" my point is that the restrictions after a THR are permanent. I would never be able to raise my knee to its full extent, sit on a low seat or i suppose even bend down and touch my toes! And those are only the restrictions that occur immediately to mind.

    Bikes are beautiful, Trikes are terrific!
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I can't do any of those things now (apart from the toe-touching) I haven't been able to ride a bike for years and I do miss it. I am waiting for two new knees and the restrictions after those will be paradise compared to the current restrictions I face. I suppose that a simple ball-and-socket joint will have more restrictions compared with the more complicated hinged ones but I reckon you will be able to achieve more than you might think. What has your surgeon said about this? DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • scribblerscribbler Posts: 54
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The consultant said that he couldn't guarantee that I'd be able to ride my trike after the op.

    Just to cheer you up, Dreamdaisy several of my friends have had knee replacements and find them marvellous. In fact at a recent coffee morning four old ladies sat round showing off their scars and saying how much they could do now. One friend had two knees done and is now back on her bike.
    Best of luck with your new knees.
    :):):):) (these are my 4 friends - not your knees!)
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I am very pleased for them, that is a good thing and I know that they can work well especially if they are the only affected joints. I am in a bit of a mess, with two kinds of arthritis and thirty-nine affected joints. I am waiting for the days when a whole new body can be created! :lol: I wish you well, Scribbler, here's to a better future for both of us, yes? DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
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