peake!

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  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,646
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Caliban I really enjoyed that!

    I liked the sense of rhythm, the alliteration and the way it is written at times 'forces' the reader to pause.......

    and think :D

    The 'two-line' repetitions are also very effective.

    Thanks

    Toni xx

    PS We do have a poetry thread on this page, but it tends to be for poems we have written ourselves. Of which I am not capable :oops:
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I do write one from time to time. Mostly to light the woodburner with it, once it is written :)
    I like the pictures and the scenery Peake creates. I like the dead and prancing trees, for example.
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Caliban that is lovely...and dont you go throwing away your poems..my brother did that and I stop him and he started to keep them in a folder..he is no longer with us now..but I love to read them x
    Love
    Barbara
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    But this way my poems keep me warm! :) I did the same with my drawings from art school. I just got rid of them. A couple of thousands.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh Caliban! That's lovely. Reading it, I'm in a quiet, tranquil, slowed down imaginary world. I would love to have come up with the concept of the 'Halibut Hills'. I confess, I'd never heard of the poet though I've just checked him out. I've never read the Gormenghast novels. I have a feeling one of my sons had them.

    Poems make rubbish firelighters. Prawn crackers are the best. Please let us have a look at some. One? (Poem, not prawn cracker.)
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Wonderful. Thank you, Caliban, I knew of him via the Gormenghast novels (terrific use of langauge in those) but I did not know about this other string to his bow. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    You find this poem in "Gormenghast". Have a look at the "frickled cake in the throngs of love", before you take your path to the purple sea! :)
    The language in 3Gormenghast" did not much matter to me. I liked this very weird atmosphere.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Ok- here we go:
    http://ww2.cs.mu.oz.au/~rafe/the_frivolous_cake.html

    Sorry, Miss Stickywicked, I'm very poetry shy. AND mine are not necessarily written in english. But they do a wonderful job in my woodburner.
    Finally I understand the use of prawn crackers! I always thought they are made as shock-absorbing fillings in packagings.
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,646
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Fantastic poem!!!

    the pace,(fast then slower), the language,(complex and simple), the images it creates.

    A great adult-kid verse :D

    Thanks again

    I do understand you might be a private poet fair enough