Straight leg raise

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knuckleduster
knuckleduster Member Posts: 551
edited 17. May 2014, 07:05 in Living with Arthritis archive
Does anybody else have difficulty doing a straight leg raise when lying down after having a THR? For three years I've been trying to do this exercise and always irritate my knee. Have just been to see my osteopath as he is very good with my aches and pains and I demonstrated the trouble I was having. But he couldn't come up with an answer, in fact he was quite baffled as everything is working well. All he could come up with and, he wasn't sure about this, is that after having a THR you lose the reflexion to some extent.

Have a good weekend everyone.

Janet xx

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  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I wouldn't say I found them easy, straight after a THR, but definitely possible and more possible the more I did. Certainly, in the first few days, it's almost a matter of re-learning which muscles are supposed to be doing the job although I've done them every day for years anyway.

    I've never been told to do them lying down, though. I've always done them sitting on the bed with my back against a pillow at the bed head.

    Is it just the straight leg raises that cause the problem? How long since the THR? (Sorry for the interrogation)
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • knuckleduster
    knuckleduster Member Posts: 551
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Yes stickywicket, it's just the straight leg raise. Every other movement is fine, but it's now three years and obviously whatever muscles I need in that leg, knee or hip to do that exercise just don't work any more.

    Unfortunately I did come out of the op with permanent muscle and nerve damage and my surgeon keeps suggesting I have a nerve conductor test to see the extent of the damage but, as he said, it would only be for academic reasons and there wouldn't be anything he could do to repair the nerves.

    Janet
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    My extremely uneducated guess would be that, if it's nerve damage, you might simply not 'know' how to do it but still be capable of it and possibly if someone would, at first, help to raise the leg for you, at the foot end, you might be able to re-learn how. If there's muscle damage, it's possible you might never be able to do it. How about going back to a physio?

    I think the only way you'll find out for sure what damage has been done is by taking the nerve conductor test that the surgeon recommended. You could have a look at Arthritis Care's booklet on exercise http://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/PublicationsandResources/Listedbysubject and see if there are any exercises you're not doing that might help.

    Does it affect you in everyday life or is it just the exercise itself that you can't do?
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Janet you should be very careful with straight leg raises,they can cause all sorts of probs especially if you are lying straight has well.
    You will fell the pull on your hips and back it is also known to trap nerves, I would look for another exercise.
    Love
    Barbara
  • knuckleduster
    knuckleduster Member Posts: 551
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello Barbara - I was given the straight leg raise by the hospital physio after I had my knee tidied up prior to having the THR. And it wasn't just raising it, I had to draw out the alphabet with my foot. It was hard work, but I did it each time, but haven't been able to perform this particular exercise since the THR.

    Stickywicket - I do exercises for all my bits and pieces five days out of seven, but I was told this particular one is very good for toning up the muscles surrounding the knee. My walking hasn't been brilliant since the THR in so much as I have to "think" about walking and, if something distracts me, my whole leg just dips and I stop walking. It's a bit of a bind to say the least, but it's something I've had to learn to live with. Afterall, there are worse things than a dippy leg.

    Janet
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh indeed! I have a dippy brain :lol:

    I think this is one for your consultant/physio, Janet.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • krisbe
    krisbe Member Posts: 95
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I was not told to do a straight leg raise. My physio told me to do all my exercises standing up and put leg out forwards and hold for the count of five while balancing on the other. The first physio I saw in hospital told me to do the exercises on the bed, but the one I saw on my first physio appt post op said they do the same thing and I could do them laying down sometimes if I wanted to.
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Janet if I was you I would questions these exercises..they put so much strain on your back and like I said cause nerve or sciatic pain that can be hard to get rid of..all the other exercises for THR ie back lift knee raises, side raises but please be very careful with the straight legs..I have seen the damage done .
    Love
    Barbara
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    As I understand it, the potential danger of straight leg raises is that, if done too quickly (They should be done very slowly) the wrong muscles are used and the pelvis is then tilted at the wrong angle. This is what can cause back problems. It's much easier to do them the wrong way as far less effort is required :roll:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright