Anyone tried Hydrotherapy?

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Bonnielinda
Bonnielinda Member Posts: 37
edited 19. May 2014, 06:21 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi all, haven't had a chance to post in awhile. I met a fellow sufferer on the bus last weekend and she mentioned Hydrotherapy. She said it does wonders for her hip pain. I didn't get a chance to question her about it as we had arrived at my stop. I was just wondering of anybody here knew more and had had the therapy themselves? Is it available on the NHS?

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  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've had it a few times when I've been particularly bad. It feels good as the water's warm and, supported by it, you can get your limbs into positions they don't normally like. I've always found the hydro physios really good and understanding of my limits and also knowing how far to push me.

    Does it help? I'd say definitely if you follow it up with the exercises out of water. Otherwise it's just a pleasant way of wasting a morning / afternoon :lol:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • tjt6768
    tjt6768 Member Posts: 12,170
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Linda.
    I had a course of it a couple of years ago. Was great. But whenthen the pool at Chapel Allerton shut :shock: :roll:
    Apparently there weren't enough physios trained to use the pool :o
    then train MORE...

    That was on the NHS.
    If you get a chance give it a go hun. It was much easier on the joints when doing exercises.
    e050.gifMe-Tony
    n035.gifRa-1996 -2013 RIP...
    k040.gif
    Cleo - 1996 to 2011. RIP
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Yup, I did it when no-one knew what was really going on with me; when in the water it was fabulous but the resulting 48 hours stranded on a sofa not worth the bother. I think if it's OA that is troublesome then it may well be beneficial but when it's an auto-immune it may not: that's my experience so not worth the typing! :wink: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Just for the record – mine's RA. I usually agree with DD but this must be the exception that proves the rule :wink:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Mormodook
    Mormodook Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've been to hydrotherapy on the NHS for RA. I'd say it helped a little to loosen me up but nothing major! The benefits of the warm pool and gentle exercises were ruined a bit by being cold afterwards and having to wriggle out of a wet swim suit ! That was my memories from about 15years ago when first diagnosed ! I've not been offered it since or would go seeking it out ! :)
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Whenever I've had it (NHS) we were always wrapped up from head to toe in big towels afterwards and made to lie down for 5 -10 minuts before getting dressed. Wonderful!
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Tubby
    Tubby Member Posts: 177
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    We have a hydrotherapy pool at work (the Community Trust, a Charity based at a professional football club) and it is fantastic. I have PsA and it really works for me but we also have many people with variations of arthritis alongside the folk with the new knees, hips, ankles and even back operations use the pool. Even though I say it myself, our pool is particularly special as it has an underwater motorised treadmill - we don't know of anything else like it open to the general public, which this is.
    The water and the pool room are kept lovely and warm and the tank can be used for running, walking, swimming, stretching, performing exercises or just laying in the jet pumps at the back.The people that use it range from people with severe disabilities (we have a fully motorised hoist and hydraulic changing bed) through to elite athletes (well mainly footballers!).
    The treadmill allows people to walk when other circumstances they can't because their weight is supported.
    It has given me the chance to do exercises I thought i would never do again and I feel stronger and certainly much fitter. Every hospital should have at least one of these things but i don't suppose they will get one! If you get the chance, have a go at hydrotherapy, it really is worth it.
  • As5567
    As5567 Member Posts: 665
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I used to attend hydrotherapy sessions for AS at my old hospital, I did find them to be actually very helpful to ease the stiffness in the spine and some other joints. Sadly after being forced to re located to my nearest hospital I have lost access to this now.

    It is indeed available on the NHS but I guess it depends on the facilities that your hospital has. I would certainty mention it and try to get a few sessions to see how you get along. It's no quick fix tho, you need to put the work in outside the pool also to get the full benefits. If I remember correctly the NHS usually will only fund most people for x amount of sessions due to the cost, but your physio can request for you to have more if they think it's needed.
  • lynnoot
    lynnoot Member Posts: 52
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I had hydrotherapy at out local hospital, I really liked it, but then the pool was shut. I should think it was due to cost cutting. I have searched around locally but haven't found anything yet. I would be prepared to pay if I could find one. I did go to a Skylarks pool which was really warm, but that closed down as well.

    It was really lovely in the warm water, not sure if it had any long term effects, but just being in warm water makes me feel better.
  • bubbles
    bubbles Member Posts: 6,508
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I haven't as yet, I would love to go to a thalaso therapy, where they use salt water pools and jets etc, just to feel supported by the water would be lovely. I will ask my gp to send me, that will work i am sure. lol
    XX Aidan (still known as Bubbles).
  • Mormodook
    Mormodook Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Whenever I've had it (NHS) we were always wrapped up from head to toe in big towels afterwards and made to lie down for 5 -10 minuts before getting dressed. Wonderful!
    Sounds bliss ! Wish I had been wrapped up ! I Just remember trying to get changed quickly and shivering ! Your experience sounds like a luxury spa compared to mine ! :D
  • DebbieT
    DebbieT Member Posts: 1,033
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi,

    I had 4 sessions during my 'coping skills course' for fibromyalgia.

    It was bliss. The heat & yoga were absolutely wonderful. I'm hypermobile but even the stretches were more controlled in the hydropool.

    The absolute worst part was coming out of the water, u go from such high buoyancy to gravity taking full effect again & it was like trying to walk out with concrete around ure feet!!!

    We were never allowed to do more than 30-40mins max as fm really doesn't do to well with extended exertion.

    It was lovely while I was in the pool tho.

    Xx xX
    Healing Hugs
    Debbie.x
  • Bonnielinda
    Bonnielinda Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you all for your reply!! It does sound like it would be a good way to access parts of my body that feel like they could do with a good stretch and some movement to get rid of stiffness.

    I have noticed when I go for a swim I do feel a bit better for awhile. Now, just to find a more permanent solution ......
  • Bovey
    Bovey Member Posts: 25
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have AS and am lucky enough to have a jacuzzi which I use daily to do my exercises. Total bliss. It also helps in the middle of the night when the pain is unbearable. Yep I sit in the garden in the jacuzzi in the middle of the night. As you do when the mood takes you! Heat and bubbles suffuses the brain with stimuli and as we all have one track minds the brain has difficulty focusing on pain when other stimuli are having to be processed - distraction therapy. It can work, but isn't always successful. The warm water relaxes the muscles and with AS stretching can relieve some of the pain.
    Basically anything that can keep you moving with less pain is good, but always with the rheumy team advice. My physio said that my daily 15 min exercise regime in the jacuzzi was something he wished he could give to all his AS patients.