Voice Activated Software

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mzjones
mzjones Bots Posts: 38
edited 12. Jun 2014, 01:49 in Living with Arthritis archive
For those of you with it in your hands, do you use voice activated software or devices? Do any of them work well? I used to have the software that you spoke into and it typed for you. It seemed like a good idea, but I could never really train it to get my words right. Now we have voice recognition computers, phones and media devices... With all of this stuff do any of you actually benefit from them? Once again, just curious....

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  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I know one or two on here (not regular posters) have used it but I can't remember one who actually liked it. Dragon seemed to be the best but still not much loved. I just use two fingers :wink:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dibdab
    dibdab Member Posts: 1,498
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I tried it whilst still working but didn't have the patience to persevere with training it to recognise my voice completely. I can see that it might be useful but I was trying to fill in record boxes but was needing the mouse to get the curser where I needed it, but it did not too badly with longer paragraphs of prose.

    I had a new lap top that had the soft ware pre loaded, it might be there on yours if you look, and worth a try if it doesn't cost anything?

    Deb x
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I think there is a basic programme included on Windows which can be found under accessibility . Of the commercial ones Dragon is supposed to be the best. I plan to have a go as while using the tablet is ok for short messages I find typing for any period of time very painful/difficult and it is a large part of my job.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • Starburst
    Starburst Member Posts: 2,546
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I was given Dragon by my university disability service. Like dibdab said, you do need time and patience to 'train' it to understand you and I gave up, we just did not get on well. On the flip side, I know quite a few people who really like Dragon and say it's a lifesaver.
  • mzjones
    mzjones Bots Posts: 38
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have Dragon but I totally gave up on training it. I speak fairly clear, but it just could not get it right! Maybe I'm just not patient enough...My husband constantly uses voice command on his cell phone, and everytime he does, I'm like why are you yelling at your phone... I think he likes to use it because he has tremors, but he is also trying to break the voice command. Good to hear that some people are actually finding the stuff to be useful.
  • Starburst
    Starburst Member Posts: 2,546
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    There might be other programmes similar to Dragon that are worth giving a try? My iPad's Siri cannot understand me for love nor money but I don't speak terribly clearly or loudly, just a lot. :lol:
  • mzjones
    mzjones Bots Posts: 38
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    HA HA! "Siri pay attention!" I'm thinking about getting my dad one of these programs in case his symptoms increase. Right now he is only complaining about his shoulder though so its not an immediate concern. He only complains about driving and having his sleep disturbed. I just wanted to know which good ones are out there, and if people are actually using them so I will have something in mind if I need to find something. Then there of course is my husband and his shaky hand, but he doesn't seem to have a problem finding the newest gadget to try and break.