Kerb drill

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stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
edited 3. Jul 2014, 05:12 in Living with Arthritis archive
The able-bodied – Look right. Look left. Look right again. If all is clear, cross.

Me – Look right. Look left. Look right again to check it's safe to step down into the gutter. Turn sideways in order to put worst leg down first. Wobble for a bit too long. Turn back. Look right. Look left. Look right again. Turn sideways. Get down to gutter quickly with determination. Look right. Look left. Look right again. Wait for car. Look right. Look left. Look right again. Recall that cars coming from left have only just entered the 30mph zone and many are blissfully oblivious. Look left again. Look straight ahead, walk as quickly as possible and hope.

I believe the able-bodied are constantly having to seek out new challenges in order to feel stretched. Poor dears :roll:
If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
Steven Wright

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It is a nightmare, isn't it? I don't mind the motorists so much but cyclists scare me, they can barrel out of the blue (and often do). Even if I have to go out of my way to use a crossing I will because that gives an illusion of safety (and usually a dropped kerb!)

    Is this why the healthy do stupid things like climbing mountains, hang gliding, extreme ironing etc.? DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    SW you put things so brilliantly it always makes me laugh even if I shouldn't. :lol: .I don't do much crossing of rds these days..must say if I have my crutches instead of the chariot I do find a lot of driver aim for me... must think its the bowling ally.. :roll:
    Love
    Barbara
  • LignumVitae
    LignumVitae Member Posts: 1,972
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    All those people trying to find an adrenaline rush - if only they knew. You do put it so well,Barbara is right! I'm giggling but really it isn't funny is it?!
    Hey little fighter, things will get brighter
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Barbara and LV, it's really OK to laugh. In fact I think it's imperative otherwise we start taking ourselves too seriously. If we just stand outside ourselves sometimes and look at the reality as others must see it – yes, it's funny.

    I come from a family, on my mother's side, that could find a laugh in anything, anywhere, anytime and I'm very grateful to them. I'm certainly not prepared to treat arthritis with solemnity and gravitas. We might share a body but I got there first :wink: It feeds off sadness and dejection and despair but it can't handle humour so that's my favourite weapon :mrgreen:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • LignumVitae
    LignumVitae Member Posts: 1,972
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I couldn't agree more with that, laughter is the best medicine for all ills but Arthritis in particular hates a good laugh.
    Hey little fighter, things will get brighter
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Wise words as ever, Sticky; I like your statement that 'We might share a body but I got there first :wink: ' - how true that is. Of course can (and should) laugh at ourselves and our situations, it's one of the best coping strategies out there at our disposal. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben