Diagnosed with RA recently

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oojammyflip
oojammyflip Member Posts: 6
edited 15. Jul 2014, 04:40 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi,

I'm 24, in East Sussex, just been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (2 weeks ago). I don't have a lot of information about RA.

So any help, tips or information would be fantastic.

Thanks

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  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello oojammyflip
    And welcome to the forum, you have come to the right place for info,at the min I have OA so cant offer much help , but I am sure others will be along soon, it must have been such a shock to you,
    Love
    Barbara
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello oojammyflip and welcome to the forum. All too many of us on here have RA :lol: What do you want to know? You can check out Arthritis Care's 'Publications and Resources' (Near the top of the page) but, if there's anything you want to ask us, ask away. What meds are you on?
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • oojammyflip
    oojammyflip Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi, at the minute it's all rather new to me, I'm still in pain and feel gutted that my energy is low and I can't do what I used to. So any tips to help with general day to day would be fantastic.
    I've just started methotrexate, hydroxychloroquine, folic acid and Celebrex.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I'm eighteen years in and know exactly how you feel and what you mean. I am thankful that I am an old hag of 55 - it must be so much harder for you young 'uns. :(

    Over the years I have learned to listen to my body and use my pain levels as feedback. I have learned to adjust what I do and how I do it, and how to pace myself (but I do get things wrong every now and again, we all do). I accept and understand that pain is a fact of my life but I choose to keep the pain relief to the minimum so that I can function as best I can with my mental abilities intact. I've learned that the stronger the pain relief the more you are removed from the pain, not vice-versa: it also means I have an escape route when things flare. I have PsA (psoriatic arthritis) and that in turn has led to osteoarthritis in various joints and fibromyalgia all over.

    You are in the very early stages so, all being well, the meds will help. I have seen over my years of attending rheumatology that many people are doing far better than me thanks to earlier diagnosis and thus starting the meds sooner; you will hopefully be included in this number. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It's all a bit bewildering at first and hard to get ones head round but you are now on some proper disease modifying medication so hopefully you'll soon see a difference.

    Fatigue is a part of the disease. It's worse when things are not under some control but often lurking away in the background. Go easy on yourself until you learn your own limits. Push them when you want but be prepared to pay later :roll: A good, healthy diet will help and, if you smoke, don't :lol:

    Pain is a fact of our lives. Usually it's an indication of something being wrong and needing fixing as when we break a leg or somesuch. However, although there is something wrong with us we can't be totally 'fixed' so I'd suggest you aim to reduce the pain to a level you can cope with rather than eliminate it. Several people on here have got into difficulties chasing the nirvana of 'painfree' which usually involves increasingly powerful pain relief and the side effects of taking it.

    There is a thread higher up called 'Ideas to make life easier'. maybe you'll find it helpful.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright