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First time saying hi and asking for information.

flindersflinders Posts: 5
edited 7. Sep 2014, 14:27 in Say Hello Archive
Hi I am new to all this. Today I went to the specialist to talk about ganglions only to be told I had Osteoarthritis in both my wrists. I am 49 and work full time. The specialist said I need to change my job and work less ( I love my job and I am in shock at the minute).
He said he would write to my GP. But that's all he said so I don't know what to do or what the next step is.

Comments

  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello finders.

    This all sounds a bit odd so please bear with me if I ask a few questions :)

    Firstly, you don't mention pain. That's usually the first thing that people with any form of arthritis talk about. Secondly, you were referred to a specialist and I'm wondering what sort of specialist. I didn't think the NHS usually did anything with ganglions except perhaps excising the fluid which I thought a GP could do. Also, have you had any x-rays done to confirm OA?

    Of course you are in shock if you feel your life is about to take a sudden, unforeseen change. Do you use your wrists a lot in your work? Usually it's considered good to keep moving arthritic joints though not if it's causing undue pain.

    Please feel free to ask any questions you have and we will try to answer. You'll get a better response on the Living With Arthritis forum as not many people look in here. If you feel you need a chat about it why not ring our helpline people? The number's at the top of the page. I do hope we can help.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • flindersflinders Posts: 5
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello finders.

    This all sounds a bit odd so please bear with me if I ask a few questions :)

    Firstly, you don't mention pain. That's usually the first thing that people with any form of arthritis talk about. Secondly, you were referred to a specialist and I'm wondering what sort of specialist. I didn't think the NHS usually did anything with ganglions except perhaps excising the fluid which I thought a GP could do. Also, have you had any x-rays done to confirm OA?

    Of course you are in shock if you feel your life is about to take a sudden, unforeseen change. Do you use your wrists a lot in your work? Usually it's considered good to keep moving arthritic joints though not if it's causing undue pain.

    Please feel free to ask any questions you have and we will try to answer. You'll get a better response on the Living With Arthritis forum as not many people look in here. If you feel you need a chat about it why not ring our helpline people? The number's at the top of the page. I do hope we can help.

    Thank I will look at the Living with Arthritis forum.
    But just to answer your questions. Yes I have been in a lot of pain in my both my wrists. So after being referred to a hand specialist I had an MRI done, I was then told I had a large ganglion in one wrist and a small in the other and these are causing the pain. He said it was not Arthritis. He then referred me to his colleague who sent me for an x-ray he told me it was Arthritis which is causing the pain. I build cars for a living and use my hands hand starting bolts and using power tools for up to 9 hours a day.
    The specialist has told me to change my job and basically work less and this job is no good for me anymore. Apart from the fact it is easier said than done I do like my job and would like to try and keep doing it until the pain is too much or am I making the Arthritis come on faster?. I am 49 yrs old now and have never had a desk job. I have also been told I have Arthritis in my foot which is starting to give me pain. It is just the fact that he said work less change job and I will write to your GP. Is that now or do I see someone who knows about Arthritis??? I am going to wait until my GP receives the letter and make an appointment.
  • hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Flinders
    The first thing that struck me is you were told its Osteoarthritis.
    Well a GP deals with OA....so I think he should be getting a letter soon and should get in touch. If not I would ring and check has he heard from the consultant.
    Its always handy when you go for appointments....any consultants.....you ask to be copied into the letters so that you know what has been said about you and when the GP has received the letter.
    Usually for OA all that happens is the GP gives you pain killers {dullers LOL} and possibly anti inflammatories ......if that is the case make sure you get a stomach protector eg lansoprozol or something similar.
    I know you are young but do you have an arthritis group close by?
    You will get lots of information from them. They usually meet once a month.
    As SW said earlier get in touch with the helpline....they will answer questions for you or point you in the right direction.
    I don't know what area you live in so cant suggest a group but if you go to the front page of the web site, click on MY AREA then down the side bar it should mention branches.

    Love
    Eileen
  • flindersflinders Posts: 5
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hileena111 wrote:
    Hi Flinders
    The first thing that struck me is you were told its Osteoarthritis.
    Well a GP deals with OA....so I think he should be getting a letter soon and should get in touch. If not I would ring and check has he heard from the consultant.
    Its always handy when you go for appointments....any consultants.....you ask to be copied into the letters so that you know what has been said about you and when the GP has received the letter.
    Usually for OA all that happens is the GP gives you pain killers {dullers LOL} and possibly anti inflammatories ......if that is the case make sure you get a stomach protector eg lansoprozol or something similar.
    I know you are young but do you have an arthritis group close by?
    You will get lots of information from them. They usually meet once a month.
    As SW said earlier get in touch with the helpline....they will answer questions for you or point you in the right direction.
    I don't know what area you live in so cant suggest a group but if you go to the front page of the web site, click on MY AREA then down the side bar it should mention branches.

    Love
    Eileen

    Ok Thanks very much. I will look into the nearest group

    Sharon
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    So, it sounds as if, between them, the specialists have checked everything and the outcome is that you do have the ganglions but do also have osteoarthritis which is also in a foot.

    This is not good news for anyone but especially for someone like you who uses their hands so much in a job they enjoy. Exercising joints that have arthritis is good because it keeps the muscles strong and supportive and that lessens the pain and, to some extent I think, slows down the degenerative process. However, putting them under too much pressure is not good for them and it sounds as if your job does that.

    That's just my understanding. Your GP will be able to deal with your questions better than I and I suggest you make a note of any questions you have to take with you when you see him. Usually consultants reports arrive in about two-three weeks but you can ask the receptionist and ensure your appointment is made for after the report comes in.

    GPs are the people who deal with osteoarthritis so it's unlikely that you'll be referred to another specialist. (Rheumatologists deal with auto-immune forms of arthritis. I have a foot in both camps as my auto-immune arthritis led to osteo.) Unfortunately, there isn't a great deal they can do other than prescribe anti-inflammatory pills and pain relief. Sometimes physiotherapy can help and sometimes they will refer patients to a Pain Clinic which teaches ways of dealing with pain. The rest is more or less up to us. It can be tough at times and that can involve tough decisions.

    I'd suggest you take no action until you've had a chat with the GP but, if the specialist is advising a job change, however painful that may be, it might be a good idea to be thinking about this, and what else you could do, rather that wait until it becomes inevitable. I'm sorry to sound rather negative but I think I'm just being realistic. Good luck and please keep talking to us if it helps.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • flindersflinders Posts: 5
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    So, it sounds as if, between them, the specialists have checked everything and the outcome is that you do have the ganglions but do also have osteoarthritis which is also in a foot.

    This is not good news for anyone but especially for someone like you who uses their hands so much in a job they enjoy. Exercising joints that have arthritis is good because it keeps the muscles strong and supportive and that lessens the pain and, to some extent I think, slows down the degenerative process. However, putting them under too much pressure is not good for them and it sounds as if your job does that.

    That's just my understanding. Your GP will be able to deal with your questions better than I and I suggest you make a note of any questions you have to take with you when you see him. Usually consultants reports arrive in about two-three weeks but you can ask the receptionist and ensure your appointment is made for after the report comes in.

    GPs are the people who deal with osteoarthritis so it's unlikely that you'll be referred to another specialist. (Rheumatologists deal with auto-immune forms of arthritis. I have a foot in both camps as my auto-immune arthritis led to osteo.) Unfortunately, there isn't a great deal they can do other than prescribe anti-inflammatory pills and pain relief. Sometimes physiotherapy can help and sometimes they will refer patients to a Pain Clinic which teaches ways of dealing with pain. The rest is more or less up to us. It can be tough at times and that can involve tough decisions.

    I'd suggest you take no action until you've had a chat with the GP but, if the specialist is advising a job change, however painful that may be, it might be a good idea to be thinking about this, and what else you could do, rather that wait until it becomes inevitable. I'm sorry to sound rather negative but I think I'm just being realistic. Good luck and please keep talking to us if it helps.

    Thanks you I think I will chat to my GP when he gets the letter.

    Regards
    Sharon
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