That Supermarket advert

Numptydumpty
Numptydumpty Member Posts: 6,417
edited 18. Nov 2014, 14:49 in Community Chit-chat archive
The new Sane's berries advert, depicting the British and German soldiers playing football on Christmas Day, is it a heartwarming account of a First World War Christmas, or as the Guardian says, "wrapping the millions killed, lost or mutilated, in a sandwich board"?
What do you think?
Numpty

Comments

  • Kitty
    Kitty Member Posts: 3,575
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I wondered that too Numpty. I felt the same when Paul McCartney used the same event in the video of his 'Pipes of Peace' song. Making a profit from events such as this is wrong in my opinion. None of the soldiers who took part in the football match are around to protest about it being used, so we should speak up for them.
  • tkachev
    tkachev Member Posts: 8,332
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I suppose it was inevitable in this anniversary year that someone would use it as a marketing ploy. Personally I switch over when the ads are on so haven't seen any of them.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,101
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    This was formerly a beautiful, heart-breaking, true story of WW1. The soldiers involved in the truce had to be moved on elsewhere as they refused to fight against those they'd sung and played with.

    To me, this ad is utterly cynical and exploitative. They are using the heroic dead to get punters into their own shop instead of their rivals'.

    And, of course, it's all for 'charidee'. Shame on the British Legion for co-operating and profiting from it.
  • LignumVitae
    LignumVitae Member Posts: 1,972
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Horrible, just horrible. You can see the smarty pants advertiser thinking they've hit the perfect sentimental note in the concept meeting and the Sains bunch riding the wave...shame on them, somethings are beyond sentimentalising for the purposes of marketing. I hope it gets dropped.
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,276
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I cried when it came on, so very sad that these young men didn't want war...like every war its started by someone in government...I remember my dad telling us this story when we were children, and totally agree that this should never have been used to advertise..
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I haven't seen it in full (only excerpts on the news) and don't need to: to my mind it is both disgraceful and offensive. DD
  • mig
    mig Member Posts: 7,152
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I find it offensive. Mig
  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sadly, it doesn't surprise me, but this advert should never have been made. It is exploiting brave and weary men in order to boost Christmas profits. What a cynical and grasping world we live in.
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I waited until seeing it before commenting on this. Having seen it I think it is offensive, and trivialises war. Says something about the British Legion too that they are supporting it.
  • mig
    mig Member Posts: 7,152
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I haven't seen it on for a few days,just wondering if its been pulled, its on their web site though.Mig
  • Numptydumpty
    Numptydumpty Member Posts: 6,417
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It seems we all feel pretty much the same way about it, makes me wonder how they could get it so wrong!
    Numpty
  • villier
    villier Member Posts: 4,426
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Just seen this, and only just seen the add the other day for the first it brought me to tears and all you could see was pound signs, it saddened me xx
  • ruby2
    ruby2 Member Posts: 423
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Perhaps I'm just naive but I saw it as 'acknowledging' the centenary of the start of WW1. They would have put an advertisement out anyway, so why not highlight the theme of the year..... and show that no-one wants war.

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