Neurology diagnosis continued, or "What ??"

Slosh
Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
edited 21. Nov 2014, 14:31 in Living with Arthritis archive
Definitely one of those you have to laugh or you'd cry things.

Saw my GP this morning, he did apologise because he was not well, but did look a bit bemused when I told him what the neurologist had said...
Anyway this afternoon I had an appointment with my lovely physio, and as I had been told this would be part of the management plan was looking forward to him explaining it to me a bit more.
Well, when I told him he looked very puzzled and said he'd never heard of anything like that before! He is going to do some research to see if he can find out about it but he felt it was more about her not being able to find out exactly what the cause of the problem is. He was also not impressed that she hadn't mentioned seeing me again. He really put me through it today... and if nothing else it did at least make me feel that I'm not making things up as I couldn't do some of the things he asked me to try.

His final words to me were "What century are we living in?"

I see him again in 3 weeks time so it could be interesting.
He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
Julian of Norwich

Comments

  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hmmm, the plot thickens, Slosh - if only there was good communication between the various medical disciplines, life for the patient would be so much easier.

    Onwards and upwards!
  • GraceB
    GraceB Member Posts: 1,598
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sounds about right to me. The left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing. Communication issues here by the looks of things. I suspect it'll be down to you to sort this out. Not what you need at the moment.

    You may want to contact your PALS section in your hospital to see if they can help with this. Here in Kent PALS have been renamed Patient Experience Team!

    Good luck and don't forget to keep us up to date with what happens.

    Take care,
    GraceB
    Turn a negative into a positive!
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The big positive is knowing that I don't have a problem with my brain as such as that thought was really frightening. It's a bit early to complain about communication from yesterday, takes at least a month to get a letter. My physio has previously complained about the fact they never get to see MRIs which does seem silly.

    I will wait and see if he finds anything out at my next visit and see how things are going.
    I now also have a total of 15 physio exercises to try and do a day, though he did say that as I'm back at work he didn't expect me to do them all three times a day with 10 repeats of each but trusted me to work out an exercise schedule. Think I'd better start setting my alarm a bit earlier!
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,557
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Plan A will happily be set out by person B to patient C, but then B forgets to let others involved in said plan know about it: it's par for the course, Slosh, in the wonderful world of the NHS lack of communication is the norm. :roll: Mind you, that charge can often be levelled in any large organisation. It is frustrating for us as patients, there's no doubt about that. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Totally agree. Mind you what made me laugh was Abdel's (physio) reaction of disbelief to the diagnosis. Will be interesting to see what his research discovers.

    Thing is, in a way, having been involved with SEN for so many years in school I am well used to reports that describe a pupil's difficulties and then say cause unknown! Or if they are trying to sound as though they know, idiopathic.

    Ho hum....
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,331
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hm. Clear as mud, isn't it :roll: I still think it's good news but just wrapped in some impenetrable packaging. Good luck with the exercises.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I agree Sticky, thinking there was possibly something wrong with my brain was very scary. Started my new "aggressive" exercise routine which included getting up 10 minutes earlier so I could do them all before work.

    My physio described it as an aggressive programme, said it will be frustrating and tiring, and then, with a laugh said "but we've got to unblock that brain of yours".
    Never done this much exercise a day in my life.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,331
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Aggressive – yes. Tiring – yes. But won't it feel good when you start to unblock it? I think mine requires dynorod :roll:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Fingers crossed.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich