Inflammatory Osteoarthritis

kittychaos
kittychaos Member Posts: 6
edited 18. May 2015, 04:00 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hello everyone,

After 10 years where I have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, then changed to Joint Hypermobility and osteoarthritis, I now have a diagnosis of inflammatory osteoarthritis. I'm wondering if anyone can help me with these questions:

Has anyone else got this diagnosis? Have you been able to get any books on it? And what exercise do you do? Thanks in advance

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,086
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Welcome back kittychaos, although I'm sorry you've had to return because of your arthritis. I'm sure you will get a lot of help and good advice from all the lovely people on here.

    It is a little quiet being the weekend, but I'm sure that someone will be along shortly to help.

    We are here if you need any support to do with using the forums. Many of the mods have some of the many varieties of arthritis and we all know about the feelings that go along with having it.

    I look forward to reading your posts on the forum.
    All best wishes
    Mod B
  • kittychaos
    kittychaos Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks x
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,278
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm sorry kittychaos but this is a relatively new one on me. I had thought that arthritis was either OA or an inflammatory kind not both though, come to think of it, I did read somewhere of a trial (I think) in which selected OA patients were treated with methotrexate. I tried looking for 'inflammatory osteoarthritis' both on here and on Arthritis Research UK but couldn't find anything that seemed relevant. I think you'd best go back to your docs and ask them for more info.

    As for exercises - I don't think there any specific exercises for specific forms of arthritis. Try some of those that Arthritis Care recommend http://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/Search/search_results_page_view?SearchableText=exercises - left column. Personally, I do quads, arm and hands exercises, step ups and core muscle stuff.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Kitty, and welcome.

    I`m sorry, I can`t help with your questions - just wanted to wish you well.

    I would think low impact exercises would be the way to go - exercise bike, or swimming perhaps.
  • kittychaos
    kittychaos Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks, the only thing I could find on an American site was that it was really rare! At least I'm unusual or strange .... I was going to be put back on Methotrexate but the Dr decided to start with Plaquenil, let's hope that's where I stay.
  • Roadback
    Roadback Bots Posts: 35
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Kitty

    I read a number of years ago (2011) a study by Stanford medical university in the US that Osteoarthritis might often be mis termed as wear and tear - as there is usually long-term lowgrade inflammation involved. In fact they suggested that the mechanism was similar to Alzheimer's - with joints being the target rather than the brain.

    It has never made sense to me that we have been told that some people get wear an tear in their 20s, 30s etc - when other people do loads of exercise using their joints to their 70s and 80s - I think that much of early age OA is inflammatory.
  • TrishaW
    TrishaW Member Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Kitty. I have inflammatory osteoarthritis. mine is also called undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy or seronegative arthritis. i was originally diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis as my fingers looked very like RA (acute onset, symetrical, red, hot, swollen) I had all the usual DMARDs and anti TNF with little effect except for horrible sideeffects. then i changed rheumatologist and my new one queried the RA diagnosis. i had more MRI scans and ultrasounds which said inflammatory OA not RA (they can tell by looking at the joints and where the fluid is or something) Anyway my hands and feet are the most affected plus I have affected tendons and fatigue etc. You asked about exercise. I go to hydrotherapy which is very helpful (I had sessions with a physio to show me the excercises, now I do them on my own) I also bought a Pilates Performer machine years ago at home. It was very expensive but allows me to execise with no joint stress (I got mine via QVC -that way you can send it back within 28 days if it dosn't suit). I also do hand exercises with putty and try and walk if I can 9in good trainers) though sometimes i can't go far and i can't at present as I've had foot surgery ( a joint fusion) As I can't take medicines to help much I try and eat non inflammatory foods as much as possible and take fish oils and vit D3 every day.I hope this helps. good luck :) Trisha x
  • TrishaW
    TrishaW Member Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Also Kitty...my rheumatologist thinks my inflammatory OA is a result from having reactive arthritis when I was younger. Apparently that can happen (some people with reactive arthritis go on to later develop OA). Maybe your original diagnosis of RA was infact reactive arthritis and now you have the resulting inflammatory OA??? jus t a thought! x
  • kittychaos
    kittychaos Member Posts: 6
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks everyone, Trisha your scenario makes a lot of sense to me, in a short space of time 10 years ago I had an awful virus, then over active thyroid, then "rheumatoid arthritis" it makes sense to me that it was in fact reactive arthritis, anyway I really appreciate the help and support from you all.
  • LignumVitae
    LignumVitae Member Posts: 1,972
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I don't know about inflammatory osteo but I do know that there is increasing research interest into OA and whether it is beyond wear and tear. I would second hydrotherapy and swimming as exercise options but take it slowly. The pool can make you feel much freer because you have the water supporting you, however, you also have the resistance of the water as you move against it and what feels good and easy a the time might feel sore a few hours and days later.
    Hey little fighter, things will get brighter