Pain or no pain?

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stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
edited 16. Jun 2015, 03:29 in Living with Arthritis archive
It sounds a no-brainer but, if scientists currently working on the 'pain' gene could switch it off, would you go for it? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-33105759

At first sight – obviously yes.

But..

I banged the fridge's veggie compartment (full of heavy root veg) into my shin the other day. That's the shin under the knee revision. I have to look after it as it's prone to cellulitis. The pain keeps reminding me to check for early signs of it.

When I get the slightest sore throat I know my wisest course to avoid big trouble is not to take my meth that week.

I have stomach / oesophageal problems. As soon as the pain begins I know the quickest route back to normality is to cut out lots of foods and drinks, especially the gallons of daily tea.

It seems to be an all or nothing solution. I suspect it would create at least as many problems as it solved.
If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
Steven Wright

Comments

  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I voted for the first option - the unfortunate necessity. Coincidentally, I just recently read an article about a child who is unable to feel any pain - I can`t remember the medical term - and the child`s parents said it`s a nightmare trying to keep him safe. He has to be watched constantly - hot things can burn him yet he feels no pain. It isn`t something he will grow out of.

    If there was an option to switch pain off every now and again, I would take that!!
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    This week I would like the pain to be gone...but I have read about people that don't feel pain..like you say its there for a reason...but don't think mine is..its not got a reason.... :roll:
    Love
    Barbara
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Pain is a useful method for the body to alert us that something is not as it could or should be. For healthy people once the problem is solved the pain goes but the majority on here won't experience that relief because our conditions don't work in that way. I found living with arthritis far easier once I had overcome my fear of pain - it took time but I learned that it isn't anything to be afraid of, that it's there for a reason and that reason is to let me know to slow down or even stop for a rest. That's why I'm here now. :wink: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • dibdab
    dibdab Member Posts: 1,498
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I really wish it was gone......had a rough week and it's getting me down somewhat, but it's probably necessary to alert us to what's not well/right, and to remind us to deal with things in a timely fashion.

    Deb xx
  • applerose
    applerose Member Posts: 3,621
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I'd like the pain to go away but agree that we do need it. My teeth aren't very good and I sometimes get some pain. If my pain was switched off, I couldn't do anything about it. Pain is there to warn us that something is not right. Sometimes we can take painkillers for it, sometimes, unfortunately, they don't work well enough.
    Christine
  • Kitty
    Kitty Member Posts: 3,583
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Agreeing with most of you on this. It depends on the pain. Arthritis pain isn't necessary on the face of it, but it does warn you not to try to lift anything too heavy, or walk too far and things like that, or we would be in real trouble. :?

    "Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." Robert A Heinlein

  • As5567
    As5567 Member Posts: 665
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Sadly pain is something we need to survive and know when things are wrong.

    One thing which would be nice is some type of pain killer that does not contain anything addictive, has minimal side effects and doesn't build up tolerance over time. If they could tick all of those boxes then pain management could be much more effective for chronic pain sufferers in the long term where as now most strong pain killers don't offer much benefit as they come with so many side effects.
  • Starburst
    Starburst Member Posts: 2,546
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    When I was at primary school, I had a friend whose mum was a nurse. She told us a horrifying story about a young man who she had nursed many years ago. This poor boy had received a severe electric shock after climbing an electricity pylon and could no longer feel pain. He would often climb into a scalding bath, touch a hot plan, walk into walls and not realise that it hurt. That story stuck with me, as some of these things do. I hadn't thought about it until you posted this.

    I do wish that I could cope with my pain better and I do wish that it had less of an impact on my life but I would not wish to switch off my pain receptors.
  • hileena111
    hileena111 Member Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    If I had the choice I would say........switch of the chronic pain

    DONT switch off the acute pain.....that is there as a safety mechanism

    Not possible I know but we can dream :wink:

    Love
    Hileena
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    So I guess we'd all like a 'pain button' we could switch on and off. Amazingly, that doesn't seem to be on offer :lol:

    I'm not even sure I can see a point to this research as surely it would be downright dangerous to permanently switch off pain though I suppose the more they learn the more possibilities open up. Plus, it might be a safer option for those addicted to massive doses of pain relief. Or the terminally ill.

    Who knows? For the rest of us I think pain will continue to be our annoying lifetime companion :roll:
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Sarahd1609
    Sarahd1609 Member Posts: 64
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Can I be awkward and say pain but at a lower level, so I know when here I is a problem but it wouldn't be as bad lol xx
  • littleelf
    littleelf Member Posts: 69
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Any budding scientists on here that can create that switch, Sticky? Ah, now that would be a fine thing to behold. :)
    True strength is smiling when you want to cry; laughing to hide the pain; and going on, no matter what. <3
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    For me my pain is useful and should not be ignored but neither should it be the main focus of my life - there is more to my life than pain. It can, however, inspire fear which in itself brings its own complications. I found life became easier when I could no longer remember being pain-free and I don't want to have even the smallest taste of that experience, I have too much to lose. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben