New member with OA hip

newhipandy
newhipandy Member Posts: 60
edited 24. Aug 2015, 13:32 in Say Hello Archive
Hello All

I am having a hip replacement in September, and trying to amass info beforehand. My arthritis has accelerated very quickly. The first inkling I had of problems was two years ago, and at that time X ray showed a certain amount of OA in the joint. I was advised then that replacement would be the end result. So I carried on, with exercise as much as I could manage (I like running and jogged 5k once a week) and Pilates to strengthen core. This all worked OK until around the beginning of this year when I began to get significant pain and stiffness after any activity. I realised that jogging wasn't a good idea! so cut back to walking, still managing around 3 miles or so at a time. Then that got less and less until now ... well, I need a stick and can just about get around locally. Back to the consultant and he confirmed there is no cartilage left and the femoral head has collapsed. I am OK with the thought of surgery up to a point! - but would love to hear from anyone who has gone a similar route. I am not young but not collecting a pension just yet and feel that I would like to be able to get back to some active exercise after the surgery. I am already doing some pre-op exercises, as the glute muscles have all but
disappeared! Any hints and tips really welcomed. Thanks folks.
:bouncing-ball:

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, there are many on here who have had this operation so you're not alone in facing this. The time out spent recovering is well worth the reward of improved movement and much reduced (or maybe even no) pain, so what's not to like? I have OA in both ankles and both knees thanks to the joint damage caused by my other arthritis and am still waiting for new knees, I reckon I'm nearly old enough now (56).

    If you have a look on the Living with Arthritis board on here that is where you will find threads all about this, including a useful permanent one about tips for going into hospital. There's a member called tedthred, he is due an op very soon and has been asking similar questions so have a read of his threads, and post again on there so more people notice your presence! I wish you well. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello newhipandy. A new hip is a very good thing. I've had two and can't speak highly enough of them.

    As you've discovered (the hard way, as most of us do) though exercise is essential to keep supporting muscles strong, high impact exercise is not a good idea.

    This, from Arthritis Research U K might help with some of your questions about exercise both before and after http://tinyurl.com/ptzke9u .

    If you have other questions I suggest you put them on the Living With Arthritis forum as more people look in on there.

    Oh, and good luck :cheers:
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • newhipandy
    newhipandy Member Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the replies, I will follow the links and advice given. Happy Monday all.
  • alumina
    alumina Member Posts: 40
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello and welcome.

    I had a hip replacement ten years ago at the age of 54. Post-operative pain was minimal and I had a morphine pump injection machine by my side so that I could administer a dose if required. Since I have an aversion to feeling woozy, I didn't use it at all and even so, the pain was at a fairly low level.

    Despite having a blood transfusion, I was out of hospital in four days and was walking well from the start. I was told not to cross anything over a kind of "midline" - as in no bending over, crossing legs etc.

    The hip is wonderful although is not as mobile as my own hip. This may be because that is how it is with replacement hips or it could be that my joints have been fairly mobile. When I was a child, I could rest the souls of my feet on the top of my head - but sadly, no more!
    I recently had an x-ray of the replacement and, after ten years, there is no movement on the joint (a good thing I understand!). Although sad to need the operation, it is wonderful that the treatment is available. Under the circumstance, you are almost sure to be pleased with the result.
    "Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else."
    Margaret Mead
  • newhipandy
    newhipandy Member Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you Alumina for a most encouraging response. I had my pre-assessment appointment yesterday and must admit to feeling a bit wobbly at the thought of it all... the mention of spinal anaesthesia, possibility of blood transfusion etc, the procedure itself. So it is good to read of a good and smooth recovery. I too think we are very lucky to have the option to have our worn out bits replaced .... I am trying for the mindset of welcoming my new hip into my body rather than viewing it as an alien!
  • alumina
    alumina Member Posts: 40
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The operation is all the more worrying as they have to mention every unpleasant possibility nowadays. The whole process is a bit scary beforehand but afterwards, it fades away.

    Since it is different for everyone, I purposely didn't mention the spinal anaesthesia but that too was a pretty painless affair. I had braced myself to endure the pain so I wasn't totally relaxed but I hardly felt it going in. I just hope that your operation goes as smoothly as mine - without the need for a blood transfusion of course!

    You mention the thought of having something alien in your body. This is something that I couldn't get anyone to readily understand. I felt that I had had an amputation and now had something that would never be as good as the original. Yes, I was grateful etc. but still, it was alien. I did get over that after a while and think of it now more like a set of false teeth only less troublesome - I imagine!

    Please let us know how you get on. I shall be thinking of you.
    "Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else."
    Margaret Mead
  • newhipandy
    newhipandy Member Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you Alumina. I can't help picturing a set of new gnashers in my thigh now :) ... but seriously, I know it is a different thing but years ago when I had a (ahem sorry maybe TMI) coil fitted, I felt that was definitely an alien presence, but once I got over that and embraced its usefulness, i was fine! There is something strange about the concept of your body being 'invaded' by surgery and put back together again, and it needs to be ratified for peace of mind. I am going to focus on all the positives that the new joint will bring and I am sure that will aid progress in the recovery phase. Thanks for your input and I will report back on how it all goes. Andrea.