Accents

stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
edited 26. Aug 2015, 04:08 in Community Chit-chat archive
I have a Yorkshire accent and so shouldn't criticise the accents of others. Indeed, I love to hear most regional accents but occasionally a new innovation grates.

It's the substitution of the 'oo' sound by the 'i' sound which now seems prevalent mainly among young women with relatively 'posh' southern accents.

I laughed out loud this morning when the radio correspondent said "I'm licking at my screen...."
"The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran

Comments

  • tedthered64
    tedthered64 Member Posts: 84
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have a Yorkshire accent and so shouldn't criticise the accents of others. Indeed, I love to hear most regional accents but occasionally a new innovation grates.

    It's the substitution of the 'oo' sound by the 'i' sound which now seems prevalent mainly among young women with relatively 'posh' southern accents.

    I laughed out loud this morning when the radio correspondent said "I'm licking at my screen...."
    Being from Liverpool, I must admit I do love it when my daughter says " de do doe dad, don dee" which is " they do though dad, don't they!!!
    You can't make it up! :)
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 26,675
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Stickywicket :)

    I love accents too apart from mine :(

    At 20m North of Brum not great :oops: Yam yams a bit....

    I think I might know what you mean...the attempt at being posh often used by television presenters.

    Every time I watch the Midland news with my husband I go on and on about that!! Who do they think they are fooling?

    d075.gif
    Tedthered - I love that!!! Classic.
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,093
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have a northern accent, but oh who was born just a few miles away is a lot stronger..I have notice that some people are now changing cook..to curk..and for book burk...or is it my hearing... :lol:
    Ted I love it..I have cousin in Liverpool and have such different accents..
    Love
    Barbara
  • tedthered64
    tedthered64 Member Posts: 84
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    barbara12 wrote:
    I have a northern accent, but oh who was born just a few miles away is a lot stronger..I have notice that some people are now changing cook..to curk..and for book burk...or is it my hearing... :lol:
    Ted I love it..I have cousin in Liverpool and have such different accents..
    Sometimes we don't even understand each other in Liverpool!!!
    :D
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sometimes we don't even understand each other in Liverpool!!!
    :D

    :lol::lol:

    A recent Yorkshire import, among some youngsters, which I dislike is 'spart' instead of 'sport'. Why? I know language is a fluid, evolving thing but some changes seem forced.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • tedthered64
    tedthered64 Member Posts: 84
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sometimes we don't even understand each other in Liverpool!!!
    :D

    :lol::lol:

    A recent Yorkshire import, among some youngsters, which I dislike is 'spart' instead of 'sport'. Why? I know language is a fluid, evolving thing but some changes seem forced.
    Yes, totally get that, we have the same problem up here with the youngsters, 'lid' for 'lad'? Just say lad for gods sake!
  • joanlawson
    joanlawson Member Posts: 10,319
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Tha can tek t' lass art o' Yorksha, bur tha'il nivva tek Yorksha art o' t' lass.

    I'm a Yorkshire lass through and through, as you've probably gathered :lol:

    Funny Yorkshire joke:

    Yorkshire man takes his cat to the vet.
    Yorkshireman: "Ayup, lad, I need to talk to thee about me cat."
    Vet: "Is it a tom ?"
    Yorkshireman: "Nay, I've browt it wi' us."
    c1b3ebebbad638aa28ad5ab6d40cfe9c.gif
  • slomo
    slomo Member Posts: 180
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    My OH totally hates it when presenters say sickth instead of sixth. It turns him into (even more of) a grumpy old man.
    I've no idea what accent I've got nowadays, its probably a hybrid accent as I've lived in a number of different areas and have likely picked up odd local words here and there. I was born in Glasgow but it annoys me when people say I don't sound Glaswegian just because I don't have an inner city Glasgow accent. I never had one of those because I never lived in inner city Glasgow. It's a bit like expecting everyone from London to sound Cockney.

    slomo
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Our grandson had a very Glaswegian accent when first adopted at 4yrs old. I used to dread having to speak to him on the phone as I could barely grasp a word he said. Nearly 5 years on, he has a lovely gentle Scottish accent.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • skezier
    skezier Member Posts: 12,150
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Sticky :-) and Frogmorton, Barbara and all....

    Accents...I was raised to speak proper till I was 4 lol....

    Then I lived with my Nan a while so became very Cornish lol lol lol....Now I can still do the 'frit'fully well spoken' bit but as to think as its just ain't natural ;-)

    My Mother was akin to Hyacinth Bucket lol...In more ways than one...

    Father was posh...in accent but nothing else ;-)

    I was broad Cornish and clung to it lol lol lol No wonder they hated me lol..Was told not to say a word in public lol lol lol

    My posh grandmother always introduced me as her gypsies granddaughter...My Nan was my roll model...Didn't matter what thy said or did she stayed my role model lol lol lol...

    What I hate though....

    The Cornish Accent is dying....the young-uns, in some areas, just don't sound Cornish...I don't really less I hear a real one or get excited or angry then its really broad ....

    Got to go check the found dog sites but will come back for a bit soon I promise ...will do it drekly lol xx
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 26,675
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh Cris you are PROPER Cornish sounding to me ;)

    A lovely accent :)

    Mind you I like most accents and colloquialisms just not my own :oops:

    Love

    Toni xxx
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    skezier wrote:
    The Cornish Accent is dying....the young-uns, in some areas, just don't sound Cornish...

    I think all broad accents are dying as we all travel more. People used to spend all their lives in the counties and even villages where they were born. A S. Yorks. accent is still different from a W. Yorks one but it's no longer easy peasy to distinguish between eg Leeds, Huddersfield and Bradford.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • kathleenT
    kathleenT Member Posts: 3,360
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Loving this thread.

    Although I was bought up in Nottingham, I now live in Derbyshire. Even though I'm only just over (or should I say Ovver) the border, there are differences. My mum's parents came from north Derbyshire and lived in north Notts, where mum spent her childhood. A pavement was a courtsey, and although mum pronounced book, look etc the way most of us do when she was having a normal conversation, when she was reading to me she pronounced them 'luke, buke, cuke' I don't think she knew she was doing it.

    Dad's family were all Nottingham (pronounced Nottnam) and would come out with things like 'evanyonyagorranyuvemonya' (have any of you got any of them with you) or 'ehyagorrawiya' (is your wife with you) 'cummair' (come hear) and other such oddities. But all the youngsters that come from the area where I lived as a child don't speak like we did. It's all 'innit' whereas I would have said intit!! :lol:

    "Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." Robert A Heinlein

  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    We live in Durham, though my husband is from Tyneside, and has a Geordie accent, though not as thick as that of his younger brother, for whom strangers would need an interpreter. His `Father of the Bride` speech two weeks ago should have had subtitles!

    People assume I`m a Geordie too, which I`m not, coming from the other side of the river, and my accent is a Wearside one.

    My two grandsons have a hybrid accent - their father is from Durham, their mother has a lovely Hampshire `burr,` and they live in York.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I love a Geordie accent though they can be quite impenetrable :lol: They bring back happy memories of chiildhood holidays at Whitley Bay and some lovely, kind, locals.

    I confess that I, too, have never really learned to distinguish a Wearside accent. It must be very annoying when people constantly mistake you for a Geordie. A bit like someone thing I was from Lancashire :o
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • theresak
    theresak Member Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I had some childhood holidays at Whitley Bay too, then we graduated to the dizzy heights of Scarborough.

    Funnily enough, we've noticed this week how much more pronounced are our grandsons' Yorkshire accents.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,248
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    We did it the other way round :bouncing-ball:

    I think children, male ones in particular, just try to blend in. I've always suspected that Michael Vaughan's exaggerated glottal stops were a result of the trauma :shock: of moving from Lancashire to S. Yorks aged 9.

    I love the way adolescent boys, discovering their deeper range, exaggerate that, too, especially on the sports' pitches.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran