Hi, Welcome!

The community is a safe space for people living with and connected to arthritis to ask questions and share experiences. Get started by registering here and posting your first comment or question!

Sign In with a Versus Arthritis account

Different tablets

lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
I went to our doctors this week as my arthritis seemed worse.
(Its in my hip) but I now feel it all down my leg and in fingers and wrist. I saw practice nurse. She gave me Naproxen to take one, to be taken 2 or 3 times a day and Lansoprazole once a day first thing an hour before food. She explained that these were to stop the Naproxen damaging my stomach and kidneys. But I may still get stomach aches. She sent me for a blood test to check my kidneys. When I got the prescription and saw the size of the Lansoprazole tablets I thought I am not sure I can even swallow them they are huge. It says you must swallow whole. Most people I know with arthritis get co-codamol and are reasonably happy with them. Can you give me more information about these please. Thank you Linda

Comments

  • helpline_teamhelpline_team Posts: 2,072
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Linda

    Many thanks for your post to the forum, I’m sorry to hear that your arthritis seemed worse this week. You ask about co-codamol and from what I’m aware this is one of the medications that can be given for people with arthritis.

    Just to let you know we are not medically trained on the Helplines and we are unable to offer individual medical advice. There are however quite a number of medications that can be prescribed, though everyone is different as are their reactions to medications.
    Do go back to your doctor if you feel unhappy or concerned with what has been prescribed for you.
    You might like to take a look at our ‘coping with pain’ booklet, this talks of ways to manage pain aside from medications: http://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/PublicationsandResources/Listedbytype/Booklets/main_content/Copingwithpainbooklet2013.pdf

    To hear more about peoples experiences you might like to repost on our ‘living with arthritis’ forum, here I feel you will get more responses:
    http://arthritiscareforum.org.uk/viewforum.php?f=8

    Do give us a ring on our Freephone Helplines if you would like to talk informally and in confidence: 0808 800 4050 (weekdays 10-4)

    I hope this is helpful.

    Best wishes
    Lynda
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 26,003 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Lindamay. As you'll know, I'm just an ordinary forum member not one of the Helpline team but I have plenty of experience here :roll:

    Co-codamol are pain-killers. Naproxen is an anti-inflammatory pill which is designed to reduce inflammation. This, hopefully, also reduces pain. But all anti-inflammatories can damage the stomach lining which is why a stomach-protecting pill is given with them.

    I took lansoprazole for years (I now take omeprazole) and never found them exceptionally large. As they are capsules they are relatively easy to swallow even for people like me who have throat problems. I find, with any capsule, the trick is to point the darkest side towards the throat as, whatever colour they are, the darker side overlaps the lighter side. I used to have my lansoprazole at the side of the bed with a glass of water so by the time time I was up, washed, dressed and had got my breakfast ready, the hour was completed.

    There is no reason why painkillers and anti-inflammatories can't be taken together so cocos are still an option for you but they don't tackle the problem, only the resulting pain. Also they can be addictive. If in doubt have a chat with your GP or pharmacist.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for the information. Another question though. If I start to take these tablets on a bad day can I revert to Ibuprofen and Paracetamol on good days or do I have to stick to one type?
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 26,003 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Personally I don't see the point. Both ibuprofen and naproxen are anti-inflammatories. If the GP has prescribed naproxen it's because he thinks it's more effective for you and I don't think it'd be good to mix the two because, in switching, it'd be easy to overdose. But paracetamol can usually be taken with naproxen. Check with your pharmacist that it's OK for you to take both given any other meds you're on.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • helpline_teamhelpline_team Posts: 2,072
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Lindamay,

    On the point of better days and anti inflammatories, the general guidance (from the NHS) about anti inflammatories is to try to take the lowest possible dose for the shortest time. So if there are days when you feel able to take a break from them or take fewer, that may be a good idea. (Some people try using the an anti inflammatory gel to rub on smaller joints, and the milder medication such as paracetamol.) All anti inflammatories are associated with risks of long term side effects, so minimising their use is often the long term goal of self management.

    Check with your GP about all of this, so you can have a planned strategy that seems helpful bearing in mind your own health.

    I hope that's helpful

    Guy
    Helplines Team
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you to everyone for the good advice. I am giving them a go so will see how I feel after about a week
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have been taking the new tablets about a week now. The only problem is I wake in the night feeling a bit queasy and sometimes a bit of indigestion. I don't know if this is normal or it might wear off in time.
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 26,003 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hvae you been taking the lansoprazole as prescribed? If you have then I think you should go back to the GP just to check that all is OK. If not then do take it as this is what it is prescribed for.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • emmaadamsemmaadams Posts: 140
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    hi hope all is well and you are feeling better

    i use a ibuprofen gel instead of the anti-inflammatory pills i find it to be much better and it also numbs the area slightly so its not as painful ... if you are concerned about taking the pills ask your GP about the gels and ointments xx
  • bridlassbridlass Posts: 35
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi All

    Just a note. My husband's GP and mine have both said stay away from Ibruprofen . . . . increases the risk of stroke and heart attack.

    Comments please
    :?
  • theresaktheresak Posts: 1,998
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    My GP doesn`t like anti-inflammatories either, because of the increased cardiac risk. On the occasions when I do have to take them he prescribes Naproxen on the basis that it`s less damaging than Diclofenac - which for me is far more effective. I do take Omeprazole every morning, but try and limit myself to the NSAIDs only when things are really tough.
  • daffy2daffy2 Posts: 1,713
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    bridlass, if this is an issue for you then ideally you'll need to look up the relevant study/ies and data, to see what the risks and/or problems actually are. Doctors aren't always as savvy as they could be about interpreting statistics and will follow what the official bodies tell them(which don't always get it right either as seen in the case of an osteoporosis drug which was withdrawn needlessly)
    Alternatively try asking the pharmacist, who will know more about the subject.
Sign In or Register to comment.