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Had a bit of a shock!

SloshSlosh Posts: 3,194
edited 29. Sep 2015, 06:51 in Living with Arthritis archive
I got the report from my last Orthopaedic consultant appointment today.

I knew he had listened to me, and it wasn't the best of days painwise, but in a way that was probably a good thing.

The shock, reading that due to the severity of my pain and how it was affecting me I now have "quite a severe disability ".

I must admit it took me aback, but when I thought about the equipment Social Services have supplied including a bath lift and other things it fell into place.

Oh well, if it means that I get the help I need and that my current problems are being taken seriously I suppose it's all to the good.
He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
Julian of Norwich

Comments

  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It is, though I still remember the shock when I first realised I was disabled. It was as if I had suddenly leapt a chasm and found myself on the other, unpalatable, side.

    We are who we are, Slosh, and disability can't take away our true characters unless we give it permission. Your man is on the ball. Make full use of the equipment. I hope it makes a big difference. It's usually the little things that do.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • bubbadogbubbadog Posts: 5,852
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Now and again I will look at my stair lift and say to myself 'Is this really me now?' The way I see it is, my body maybe knackered but I'm still me inside! :wink::D
  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 26,190 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Aww Slosh!

    ((())) for you.

    I know it was a shock, but I reckon you have a good consultant there

    Love

    Toni xxx
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • SloshSlosh Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It wasn't the disability bit, I've got used to that, it was the two words before, "quite severe" that came as a bit of a shock!

    I'm now at a point where I am what I am, still the same inside, and have become not only more comfortable with myself, but more able to ask for and accept help, something I found very hard at first as I've always been very independently minded.

    You are right in that I am very lucky with my consultant, even though when I phoned today to make an appointment after my next tests, the earliest they could offer me was 29th December!

    I will phone again nearer to the time of my test to see if I can get a cancellation.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    As I see it, the asking for help is a key to retaining independence. No point in kn*ck*ring ourselves with small things. Much better to save our limited resources for the big ones.

    I like your plan re the consultant. As coughs and colds take hold appointments are more likely to be cancelled.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 26,190 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Slosh wrote:
    You are right in that I am very lucky with my consultant, even though when I phoned today to make an appointment after my next tests, the earliest they could offer me was 29th December!

    I will phone again nearer to the time of my test to see if I can get a cancellation.


    Maybe it's a good sign - like a good tradesperson - his long list indicative of an excellent consultant :)

    Fingers crossed for a cancellation

    Love

    Toni xx
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • SloshSlosh Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think so. I'm just very grateful to the physiotherapist who told me to ask to see him again rather than one of his registrars. Being fairly new to all this I didn't know I could do that but it has got things rolling. The registrars were not taking me seriously, the last letter post appointment was very patronising, saying they hoped my psychiatric referral would come through soon and it would "help me to turn the corner". My GP has made the referral but doesn't think I need it and that I will be discharged straight away.

    The real problem is with continuity of care, it makes a difference when you see the same person.

    Do any of you know if it possible to request to see the same registrar each time?
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Slosh wrote:
    Do any of you know if it possible to request to see the same registrar each time?

    I don't know. In my (long) experience some registrars come and go swiftly whereas others stay until promoted. Maybe you could ask to see a regular one.....
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
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