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Bilateral knee op, which anaesthetic ?

santa002santa002 Posts: 16
edited 29. Sep 2015, 08:52 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi
Well the time has come, I am having a double knee replacement, my next hurdle is what type of anaesthetic to have, the hospital are keen I should consider epidural, with, I a not keen on this, I would prefer to be asleep, but it has been put to me that recovery is quicker with epidural, anyone any comments. I may be a wuss but I have no wish to Hear Drs cutting away.

Comments

  • OliverTOliverT Posts: 26
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You'll be so off your face you wont care about the sound. THey dont want people getting anxious about things like that, so the drugs they'll put you on will put you in a good happy place. Sounds really wont be a problem.

    You could ask if oyu can wear headphones on with favourite music, but even if that's a no no the sounds really wont be a problem. If you can, talk to the surgeon about your fears of the sounds. I'm sure he'll be able to reassure you.

    FWIW - I'd feel exactly the same as you in your position, but I'd listen to all advice - especially the surgeons.

    Congrats regardless!
  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 26,187 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Well if women regularly have babies removed by caesarean this way it must be safe enough. I had my second this way (no sedation either).

    Quite nice to be able to chat away I thought. Also I did recover much quicker than the first when I had a general.

    My MIL had her hip done this way and she was so woozy she can't remember any of it.

    Best of luck

    Toni xxx
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • santa002santa002 Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for comments, etc. have to say, very nervous of the outcome, but the last 6 months has been a nightmare, ever increasing dosages of codeine, so either way anaesthetic goes, just hoping life will be better afterwards.
  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 26,187 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sounds like you're definitely ready for the op Santa :?

    Keep us in the loop won't you?

    Toni x
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • GrangiGrangi Posts: 11
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi you can do what I did as I was very aware I didn't want to be awake during the op. They can give you enough sedation so you are asleep when you go in. I did this and it was great. Good luck take care
  • dibdabdibdab Posts: 1,498
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hope it goes well what ever you decide. By way of encouragement, my dad, who was really afraid of hospitals, had a hip replacement with epidural following a fractured hip in a fall.......and he said it was fine, the staff chatted to him and were very reassuring. General anaesthetic makes me very sick post op so I'd probably go for epidural given the choice.

    Deb x
  • HelenbothkneesHelenbothknees Posts: 487
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi. I had a bilateral TKR a little over 3 years ago, July 2012. Best thing I ever did! I too was on ever-increasing doses of so-called painkillers, which weren't working by then. Since I had the op I feel as though I've got my life back.

    I can't really help with your fears, as I was the complete opposite. I had it done with an epidural, but refused all sedation as I wanted to know what was going on. I'm a control freak; maybe that explains it. I couldn't feel a thing, but the sounds are indeed pretty strange! I just chatted to the surgeon and anaesthetist. However, people who were in at the same time as me tended to take in earphones and music, have a sedative, and just doze and listen to music. This is the accepted way; they all thought I was crazy!

    It really is better to not have a general anaesthetic, as you need to recover quickly so that you can start your exercises. And you need to do those to get the movement back in your knees. I put my really good knee bend down to starting the exercises the same day as the op. It said to do this in the notes I was given, but many people didn't start till later.

    Anyway, to try to put your mind at rest a bit, it's not pleasant, but it really isn't as bad as your think it will be. I didn't have time to worry, as I got a cancellation, so three days notice when I expected 5 months! As well as getting it done quickly, I didn't have much time to be anxious. Good luck, you'll be fine, and feel free to ask me amything else you want to know. I don't come in here much now, but I try to if anyone is having a TKR, particularly a bilateral.

    Helen
  • santa002santa002 Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you to every body for your kind words of support. I will let you know how it goes later in the week, I have just come up up my stairs, bone grinding, making horrible noise, I wonder what it will be like in 2 months, can't remember what it was like before.

    Santa.
  • elnafinnelnafinn Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Santa

    I appear to be in the minority. ;) I have had quite a few ops and have had a GA every time and that is what I much prefer. I had both my knees done by GA. I prefer to be out of it every time. I recover very quickly from the GA and wish to eat and drink asap after I have come round in recovery.

    I wish you all the best with your operation whatever you decide.

    Elna
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • lindalegslindalegs Posts: 5,396 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Santa,

    I had bi-lateral knees done under GA in 2000. My throat was incredibly sore afterwards due to when they put the tubes in to ventilate me during the operation and the arthritis in my neck. I was told they would not be able to intubate me in future so I have to 'awake'.

    Since then I've had a revision of 1 knee and more recently a thumb fusion. These were both done whilst I was awake. In the operations I asked for sedation which makes you feel relaxed, dozy and detached. I did hear drilling sounds but because you can't feel anything it's like listening to someone close doing DIY or being at the dentist and hearing the dentist 'work' on another patient. I had a member of staff hovering all the time, topping up the sedation if needed. The surgeons and nurses chat to you and and sometimes between themselves. I also gently dozed on and off. It is really interesting.

    Even if I could have GA I would opt for nerve block every time.

    Let us know how goes as members of the forum who might have to have a TKR like to see all our different experiences. :D

    I hope all goes well. Good luck.

    Luv,
    Love, Legs x
    'Make a life out of what you have, not what you're missing'
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    lindalegs wrote:
    I asked for sedation which makes you feel relaxed, dozy and detached.

    Oh don't tempt me, Legs :lol:
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • newhipandynewhipandy Posts: 60
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I will add my two pennorth, and say that the spinal with sedation that i had for my hip replacement was great, I didn't feel a thing ... i was aware of some sounds but as others have said they didnt seem to have anything to do with me - snatches of music too. Apparently at one point I woke up and asked the anaesthetist "Am I in hospital?!!" I don't remember that at all! My recovery afterwards was very quick and I did not have the residual 'hangover' and wooziness that i have had with GA before. I would go for spinal every time. Good luck!
  • lindalegslindalegs Posts: 5,396 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    lindalegs wrote:
    I asked for sedation which makes you feel relaxed, dozy and detached.

    Oh don't tempt me, Legs :lol:

    'Twas delicious SW, when I have my next op I'll order you some :wink:

    Love,
    Love, Legs x
    'Make a life out of what you have, not what you're missing'
  • elnafinnelnafinn Posts: 8,043
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    My mum had an epidural for a TKR and it was a very bad experience for her. She then had to go down a week later and have an op on the same knee as she could put no weight on it. She refused to have the op without a GA and we were on her side too. Thank goodness this was granted in the end but rather reluctantly. This was done a few years ago so perhaps things have improved since my mothers experience.

    Elna
    The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything.

    If you can lay down at night knowing in your heart that you made someone's day just a little bit better, you know you had a good day.
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm so sorry your Mum had a bad experience, Elna. That must have been distressing for all of you.

    I think epidurals are regarded as safer, especially in the elderly and / or those of us with multiple problems.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
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