Adult Kick Scooters

Jen
Jen Member Posts: 155
edited 23. May 2016, 14:50 in Living with Arthritis archive
Does anyone use these? How do you find them.

I wondered if they may help when walking is painful.

I read someone with a bad back, couldn't do bicycle riding, running or even swimming but was ok walking, they found the kick scooter allowed more of a cardiac work out than can be achieved just walking.

Interested to hear what others may say if they have tried one as an adult.

Looking forward to replies

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I found this an amusing read :D : http://www.wsj.com/articles/confessions-of-a-grown-up-kick-scooter-rider-1431098923

Comments

  • Jen
    Jen Member Posts: 155
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    couple of reviews on Amazon said they can be lethal when ground is wet, which may limit when scooter can be used.
  • Gracefully
    Gracefully Member Posts: 20
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    If you google "using a kick scooter" there are youtubes which obviously extol the virtues but give an idea of what it's like to use them.

    There is one which says that it puts very little pressure on hips and knees, but if you think about it, the knee of the leg on the scooter is going to be constantly bending /straightening and it may well exacerbate any arthritic condition.

    I have tried an adult scooter a few years ago, granted it was one with bike size wheels and a larger kick board - but even so, balancing was another issue. You can get them with two wheels in the front or rear which would help that.

    I've also looked at adults using them and they all bend forward when pushing from the ground, and again it may not be the right kind of posture or movement for anyone with lower back / hip problems.
  • Ladybrown
    Ladybrown Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have to say I've never tried one, although I did once see my parents (60+) sail by the front window after dropping my nephews off to school :lol::lol:

    My mum used one for about a year to get to work before she retired, although they are both in pretty good shape (a lot more mobile than me :lol:)

    I would imagine it would depend on which bits of the user are a bit dodgy (I don't think my knees would like it much) - I wonder if you could try one out?
  • Starburst
    Starburst Member Posts: 2,546
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I considered this as an option but I am unsteady and prone to falls. I pictured myself explaining to work how I broke a bone and decided against it. :lol:
  • Jen
    Jen Member Posts: 155
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks all, its a difficult one I am still un decided.

    I think maybe its not an ideal option for aging bones, the risk of falling etc, on the other hand if just using it on smoothe pavements (tarmac) in dry conditions and relatively slower speed (ie not going down hill too fast) you could build up stamina and help overall fitness. I think would have to keep changing standing leg also and the importance of not overdoing it.

    For me I would have to carry the scooter to the areas where pavement was smooth and not uneven to reduce the risk of falling etc. just for practise and get used to using it.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,270
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'd just get an exercise bike if you are able too use one :)
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Jen
    Jen Member Posts: 155
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'd just get an exercise bike if you are able too use one :)


    I do have an exercise bike, but for me this is not enough, I have osteoporosis as well, which means I need to do weight bearing exercise, to help strengthen the bones.
  • Jen
    Jen Member Posts: 155
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Well I got one and its good to use for weight bearing, changing leg foot every so often. Strengthens legs muscles etc good cardiac exercise too when going up slight inclines, if hill is too steep I just get off and walk. Mind you so far I have only travelled for about 30 -40 mins on it round trip and probably on average weather permitting only 2-3 times a week.

    Its great to use in dry weather, gets you from A to B quite quickly, faster than walking of course. I don't use it in wet weather.

    I just started slow and built up, the back wheel break is good, the scooter is very light to lift or carry for short distances. The folding mechanism takes getting used to. The unfolding is quick and smooth but the folding for storage take more thought.

    I got the Adult x50 Iscoot, its fun :)

    I had intended to ride it to the gym and back but the return journey is all up hill and its just too exhausting after a gym session.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,270
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm glad you found the scooter helpful, Jen. It sounds as if you don't just use it in recreational areas. Do you ride it on the road or the pavement? I'd have thought the road would be dangerous for you and the pavement for other pedestrians.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • bluebell
    bluebell Member Posts: 25
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I used to use one to get from the station to home and office the other end. I felt compelled to post as I emphasize USED to use one, until I had a terrible accident.

    I got one with a brake on the handle too, being safe/sensible I thought. then one day I hit a bump in the pavement (not going fast) and fell. the handle bars spun round as I put my hands out to stop myself and I landed full force onto the handle bars and brake lever... stabbing me in the chest about 8 inches deep. ambulance and reconstructive breast surgery later that night.

    I know it's gross, but PLEASE be careful. yes, you should be on the pavement (I researched it a lot before I got one), don't have a heavy backpack on (that's why I fell on it with so much force), be VERY aware of uneven paving, loose stones and sticks etc, stay slow and get off when in doubt. My poor 6 year old daughter isn't allowed to ride her scooter with me around anymore as you can imagine :)

    good luck! (and apologies for being a killjoy)
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    There's no need to apologise, bluebell, you are not a killjoy because you have experienced the side of this machine that those who flog them won't acknowledge. I have experienced troubles with the front wheels on my rollator when it hits uneven paving or bigger chunks of gravel and they are bigger than those on adult scooters. I hope you have made a full recovery and I am not surprised that you monitor your daughter accordingly. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben