Sore eyes. Any suggestions?

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daffy2
daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
edited 11. Feb 2016, 08:35 in Living with Arthritis archive
I have occasional bouts of sore eyes courtesy of my arthritis, and thanks to suggestions on here and trial and error until recently managed to cope pretty well. However a new development is now causing problems so I thought I'd run it past the collective experience/wisdom. I am finding that the eyedrops that have previously done as 'first aid' when I first wake or if I have problems during the night now cause pain. I use ones for irritated eyes and not always the same brand. Given the cost, and short shelf life once opened I'm reluctant to go through all the ones on offer(and in any case reading the ingredients on one of the top brand range for the most part they all seem the same, just different labels - for tired/irritated/etc eyes)

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  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello daffy
    If i were you I would see the optician and ask there advice..like you say there are so many products out there, but better to have them checked out..
    Love
    Barbara
  • Boomer13
    Boomer13 Member Posts: 1,931
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Daffy;

    I have a similar problem but also bouts of inflammation in my eyes courtesy of Psa and, psoriasis inflammation on the eyelids (blepharitis). I use prednisolone drops off and on and, a lubricating eye drop with hemicellulose that works really well. This one I can buy in multiple tiny plastic vials, so you're only opening a small amount at a time. More expensive this way, though.

    Nothing works as well as keeping my eyes closed :wink: though this isn't very practical.
  • trepolpen
    trepolpen Member Posts: 504
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello daffy

    those of us with RA tend to have dry eye problems & get hypromellose on prescription , if your problems continue get it checked by your doctor but most the eye drops are very similar & try to find one that suits you
  • scouting
    scouting Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I had eye problems but couldn't get an appointment with my GP as I didn't really think I could go to an optician. They refered me without seeing my GP to an optician through the pears scheme. Only selected ones do it but it meant it was a free consultation and free follow up care. Worth asking them. Gxx
  • PetiteN
    PetiteN Member Posts: 87
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Daffy,

    I have lots of eye problems, dry eyes due to all the drops I'm on being one.

    Going to see an opthalmologist like people have said is probably best.

    I did wonder when reading your post, if it's possible that you have an sensitivity or allergy to an ingredient in the drops you've been using.
    I say this because I actually developed an allergy to the preservatives in eye drops, and only my eye consultant picked up on this.
    I had been using drops for years but suddenly developed an intolerance to the preservatives.

    I now have to use preservative free drops only- they come in individual vials or sometimes called minims.
    A GP or opthalmologist can prescribe them for you.

    All the best x
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Nothing works as well as keeping my eyes closed :wink: though this isn't very practical.
    Unfortunately keeping my eyes closed is what's nigh on impossible when this latest problem strikes, hence the need for something to use at night!
    Petite, it's interesting you mention preservatives, it's reminded me that when I had a chat with the optician during an eye test a couple of years ago she mentioned what to look out for on the ingredients list, and suggested a make which she thought(from personal experience of similar problems) would be suitable if the 'ordinary' kinds didn't work. At that time 'ordinary' together with other things like bathing was doing the job, so I'll try and find the name she wrote down and give that a go.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have never had this but I do remember my Ma forever wiping her eyes due to wet macular degeneration and how miserable she found that. I think it best to speak to an eye specialist - bathing is a good idea but whether with warm water, salt water or cold tea I don't know! I hope you can find a solution soon, it must be horrid. DD

    :balloon:
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It is pretty horrid while it lasts DD but fortunately it generally clears up(or at least becomes tolerable) by the time I've done bath and breakfast, and so far rarely happens during the day.
    Ran out of steam yesterday when in town so didn't get eyedrops, so it's top of the list this morning.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It may clear up but that doesn't mean it's acceptable, yes? Sometimes we have to adjust our priorities, and I reckon this is one that needs attention, but I also appreciate that when one is alone it's far harder to manage. You have cyber support - that's the best we can summon and I hope it helps. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Wouldn't you know it! I did get eye drops yesterday and this morning woke up with OK eyes. The bottle is sitting(unopened) on the cupboard in my bedroom ready for action - perhaps it'll act as a deterrent....
    So long as there's no sign of infection and it doesn't get any worse I'll live with it for now - I did get the yellow discharge thing last year and pharmacist(at GP suggestion as prescription more expensive than OTC) was able to deal.
    The cyber support is a great help DD. Things are a bit taxing at present - not bug, but allergies, fibro and OA all kicking off at once - and knowing there is that 'comfort blanket' out there keeps me going.Just so long as things ease up in time for the start of the visitor season in March - not least as I think this may have to be my last due to deterioration in my back on top of the rest of it.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I love the idea of a deterrent factor. I have an enormous bottle of Gaviscon on the same principle. We glare at each other daily but, so far, it remains unopened.

    I'm sorry you have so much to deal with right now. Each, on its own, merely passes as 'normal' but we get so used to juggling the 'normal abnormalities' that sometimes we have to remind ourselves that it's not normal or even acceptable and something has to give. I'm glad the eyes, at least, seem to be doing the decent thing this time.

    As DD would say – onwards and sideways.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    A few days have passed, how are things now? I hope they are easier than they have been. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Bless you DD for asking. The deterrent factor seems to have worked pretty well! I had one day of muted discomfort which the new drops dealt with(and no ouch factor when putting them in thank heavens), but I was reminded as I got my morning tea that the thicker drops make for blurry vision, so extra care needed for a while until they disperse.
    As my allergic overload has largely died down now I'm hoping that the eyes will follow suit - they have always been quick to respond to histamine malfunction - and it may be that that was the root of the problem and why the usual drops didn't work, rathe than anything to do with the OA
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It's a minefield, isn't it? But it does sound as if you are on top of this particular problem and have learned from it how - possibly - to deal with similar future ones. Until your body twigs what you're up to and moves the goalposts again. A healthy life must be a boringly predictable one. Well done, daffy.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Ah yes, the classic brolly problem springs to mind: if I have my brolly it won't rain but if I don't it will. I am pleased that things may be easing for you and long may that last. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben