Disabled loo dilemma

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Ladybrown
Ladybrown Member Posts: 130
edited 22. Feb 2016, 02:35 in Living with Arthritis archive
Just a quick question - when do you think it is right to start using the disabled loos?

although I am not at blue-badge stage yet so obviously use standard parking spaces (not that I drive much any more and the OH drops me off before parking usually), I am finding public loos more challenging. When we were away last week my OH told me off for struggling up the stairs to the Ladies' rather than going to the disabled loo and, on reflection he may have been right. I do find the loo a bit low these days and can find getting down and up painful (not to mention the pained squeaking noise I make) and I do worry a bit about getting stuck at work. I have used the disabled loo at a festival while on crutches (mostly because people expected me to and it was easier to get in, and there were no people with proper disabilities waiting) but I suppose I am anxious about taking liberties. And there might be an element of acceptance involved too...

Any thoughts much appreciated
x

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    This, to me, is a no-brainer, Ladybrown. Disabled loos are for the disabled. You are disabled. End of.

    I just wish everyone else was so conscientious. I often wait outside a disabled only only for an extremely athletic young thing - or several - to sprint out, occasionally having the decency to look a tad shame-faced. The disabled loos in airports are often used by airport staff, in uniform.

    I think we all hesitate at a point where we wonder if we are disabled enough. Surely the answer is - if you need it, yes.

    (Why not buy a RADAR key too?)
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've never seen it as a dilemma because I began using them waaaaay back in 2002 due to being on crutches. If you wish to provide some form of 'validation' then keep a walking stick handy but why should you? Disabled toilets are there for all kinds of disability (plus the baby-changing facilities because the two are often combined, I love the thought of two mums 'trading' their children :wink:) so that means that those without any physical issues but possess small humans use them.

    Disabled facilities can be misused by those who don't have any issues which narks me: having to request access in pubs, restaurants and fast-food outlets is far from pleasant but, sadly, necessary. Thank you for this post because it's reminded me I've lost my RADAR key - time to replace it, methinks! DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • hileena111
    hileena111 Member Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi
    If you feel you need to use them or have to go up stairs to use the ladies.. then just use the disabled.

    I've got a blue badge and am permanently on 2 crutches and the amount of times I stand outside the disabled loos only to to find a couple of teenagers running out after using them
    I'm not sure what stage you are at but if you are finding it difficult to use the ordinary ones please please use the disabled ones

    Love
    Hileena
  • Ladybrown
    Ladybrown Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks all xx
  • prefabkid47
    prefabkid47 Member Posts: 1,316
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Since I haven't a blue badge never really considered using the disabled loos.But with my present mobility problem will now if it circumstances make it easier............. :)
    My walking sticks come everywhere with me so how could anyone object.
    ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy''. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)
  • slomo
    slomo Member Posts: 180
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I used disabled loos last summer when we were on holiday, this was pre steroid and I was on naproxen at the time. I asked in a restaurant where the loos were and when the waitress said upstairs I think the look on my face and my involuntary moan prompted her to quickly point out the disabled loo nearby for which I was very grateful.
    Like you I've not got a blue badge (although I do have the form partially completed) and now that I'm on steroids, my movements are easier but I know it's really only pretend and I can't go running up and downstairs.
    I think I just have to decide in the context of my whole day. What have done so far? What do I still have to/want to do that day? Are we talking flights of stairs or just 3 or 4 steps. I use ordinary loos at work and when out shopping locally but used ground level disabled ones when at my OccH assessment.
    It's the usual thing of 'but you look fine so how can you be disabled.'
    I don't think of myself as disabled (I was only diagnosed in July last year), but I certainly think of myself as less able and even booked a disabled access hotel room the last time I was away as it had a lower bath and plenty of rails and supports.
    It's really a case of what's most comfortable for yourself.
    All the best
    slomo
  • Starburst
    Starburst Member Posts: 2,546
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    If it makes you feel any better, they're actually "accessible toilets" meaning that they are accessible to all those with toilet needs, rather than for those with a disability. There are many invisible disabilities and conditions that require quick and urgent use of the toilet, especially bowel and bladder ones. My mum has ulcerative colitis and if she needs to go, she needs to go NOW. I have RA (visible and physical disability) but could stand in a queue with my crutches and wait. There's not a decent person out there who would begrudge you use of the toilet.

    Take care.
  • Ladybrown
    Ladybrown Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks for all your comments - yesterday I did in fact request the key for the downstairs loo (had to wave my crutch though) rather than face 2 flights of stairs. Funny how these things creep up on you...
  • hileena111
    hileena111 Member Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Ladybrown
    Do you have to ask for a key?
    We have a shopping centre and there are 2 lots of toilets.
    In each lot of toilets there are mens, ladies and 2 disabled. Always very clean.
    We also have a Costa, Starbucks, and a Neros which have a disabled.
    None of those do you have to ask for a key
    I know there are some that you have to ask for a key or use your radar key.
    It's worth a look around to see where they are.

    Love
    Hileena
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've been in restaurants and pubs, Hileena, where you have to ask for the key: this is to stop the mis-use of the facilities by those who are fit, healthy and probably lazy.

    Starburst makes an excellent point, those with 'urgent' lavatorial needs are often criticised for using these, this was the subject of a Radio 5Live phone in last year. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • hileena111
    hileena111 Member Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi DD
    We must be lucky in our end of the country. There are the few radar keys but not many.
    Ours our kept very clean and OK you do get the occasional person using them that you think shouldn't. !!!!
    How many times have we said that this can be an invisible illness? {usually in connection with a BB} Apart from kids using them there are a lot of people that might need a high seat that you would look at them and think there is nothing wrong with them.
    For instance.........12 weeks.....{2 THR's} I had to use a one because of a high seat but if I had walked out no one would have thought there was much wrong with me

    Love
    Hileena