It's two nil to the cupboard

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stickywicket
stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
edited 29. Oct 2016, 15:51 in Living with Arthritis archive
I love our new home. But the kitchen wall cupboard / display cabinet might have to go. It's at the wrong height. Or I'm at the wrong height. One of us is.

I first tried to head it last week when straightening up after putting some paper in a bag underneath it. Today I went one better when also straightening up after dusting the skirting board underneath it. This time I dealt it a mighty blow but it remained unmoved. I, on the other hand, staggered backwards a shade too quickly for my legs to cope with. I failed to hang onto the dining chair then failed to hang on to the table and finally clattered to the floor and - final insult - banged the other side of my head on another cupboard.

I have decided my working day is over. He can cook tea. I am officially indisposed. So far, all I've got out of it is a cuppa :lol: but I'm working on it.

The cupboard might have to go. Meanwhile, my husband has taken to heading the hood over the cooker. I think crash helmets might be a solution.
If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
Steven Wright

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  • Ladybrown
    Ladybrown Member Posts: 130
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh my, what a palaver! I think the housework may be where you are going wrong though :lol:

    Hope you haven't given yourself a headache
  • trepolpen
    trepolpen Member Posts: 504
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    as for the cooker hood , I worked out how high the boss was & put it a few inches higher & with time worked out its better not to head but it

    have you considered wearing a crash helmet when working in your kitchen until you get used to it , or getting a sledgehammer on the offending unit as it should teach the other units not to do the same !!!
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Or put a worktop or another cupboard below so you can't get up directly underneath it?
    Cooker hoods can be problematic - if they are high enough not to engage with cranium they can be too high to do much good. It makes me wince to see those flash ones with the glass 'skirt' around the metal gubbins as that seems to be an accident waiting to happen. Mind you these days a lot of folks seem to choose their kitchen stuff by what's in fashion rather than with any regard to function, not surprising I suppose if it's the microwave that gets most of the action...
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,622
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Ouch ouch ouch!!

    I can see you bouncing off everything like a pinball Stickywicket!!

    Bless you :( I used to do it all the time in the caravan we had when the kids were little :roll:

    Stick some foam on the underside if you need the cupboard you will eventually get used to it's existence. If not - ditch it!!

    I hope you got fed in the end?
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you all for your commiserations and suggestions.

    I did get fed, frog. Quite well actually as I did the cooking since by then our son and his Dad were busy rescuing a new self-assembly chest of drawers from Mr SW's solo efforts in the morning.

    I rather like daffy's suggestion of putting something underneath it but the radiator is already there so I'd be limited in what could go. It might have to be the padded route. I'm loathe to take it out as it's attached to the wall so that would involve both demolition and decorating, two jobs at which Mr SW believes he is expert contrary to years of evidence to the contrary.

    Thankfully, today I merely have a bit of a thick head. Nothing unusual there, then :wink: But I shall ask my new hairdresser to go gently with me this afternoon.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    A shelf above the radiator would make something useful out of a problem and also serve to deflect heat out into the room rather than up the underside of the cupboard. It it was strong enough and or had legs you could use it to haul yourself up after grappling with the paperbags underneath....
    Dusting skirtings(good grief you've only been there a couple of weeks) - what's a feather duster on a stick for if not that kind of activity?
    The comment about a skidlid reminds me of a neighbour some years ago whose husband had problems with epilepsy that couldn't be controlled very well and who suffered regular hard impacts with pavements as a result and was facing being confined to the house. She got him a skeleton type helmet(framework so not too hot for permanent wearing) and a suitable walking pole and he was able to happily trundle round town without risking damage to his head. Interestingly his falls became fewer and fewer, a combination of letting his brain heal and getting confident again with walking I imagine. He was a cheerful soul, always happy to stop and chat.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh daffy, that's a lovely story. Making the most of a bad job is so often the way to unexpected good things.

    I rather like the idea of a shelf as, being something we installed ourselves, it would serve as a reminder to watch my head if nothing else. There is no longer paper below the cupboard. That was just a temporary dustbin bag while we were collecting wrapping paper from the boxes.

    As for dusting the skirting boards - I promise you I'm not a serial offender. Formerly, our skirting boards were painted and re-painted and nothing much improved their looks. Here, they are wooden and the combination of laminate floors throughout and lots of unpacking did create spots of dust. I was only doing them with a modern version of a feather duster (a washable felty type pad on a long stick) but still had to bend enough to make straightening up hazardous.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Sharon2960
    Sharon2960 Member Posts: 329
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh dear, it does take a while to get used to stuff after a house move! Hope you're feeling bit better now - but, cleaning skirting boards - bit of an annual event in our house - whether they need it or not lol! The shelf idea sounds like a good one - a friend of ours made one for us out of an old scaffold plank! Sounds yukky, but he made a brilliant job of it & it looks lovely!
  • bubbles
    bubbles Member Posts: 6,508
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    oh dear, I think it might need to go, you don't want to be hitting pillar and post, this is not condusive to well being..................Glad you love the house though. I think we should all have parking sensors fitted, so we avoid various objects in and around the house. Take care, lots of it. Did you get to eat your meal...............XXX Aidan
    XX Aidan (still known as Bubbles).
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Parking sensors :o:lol: What a fantastic idea! I'll have half a dozen, please.

    I did eat my meal and it was good.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • bubbles
    bubbles Member Posts: 6,508
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Parking sensors :o:lol: What a fantastic idea! I'll have half a dozen, please.

    I did eat my meal and it was good.

    Excellent :) I will invent personal parking sensors. Could be on Dragon's Den, lol. xx
    XX Aidan (still known as Bubbles).
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,281
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Oh sticky that sounds nasty..glad to hear you got a meal out of it..and hope the bruises are not to bad..x
    Love
    Barbara
  • GraceB
    GraceB Member Posts: 1,595
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Sticky, when I read your first post on this thread I was wincing in sympathy. I truly hope the bumps and bruises are settling now.

    When my late partner John sorted the kitchen out in our bungalow back in 2010 when we moved in, we had an extractor hood over the hob put in. It wasn't long before we referred to it as the "head banger" for the obvious reason. It took a while for us to get to grips with the clearance zone we needed but learning the hard way meant we learnt reasonably quickly! :lol: I still now and again have to remember the clearance zone needed.

    I must agree with the comment re cleaning skirting boards. This gets done once a year here - and that's difficult enough to achieve.

    I hope those pesky cupboards behave themselves now for you.

    GraceB
    Turn a negative into a positive!