Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy

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WhaleRoad
WhaleRoad Member Posts: 32
edited 4. Dec 2016, 11:12 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi there

Does anybody here have any experience of becoming pregnant while taking hydroxychloroquine? What did doctors advise re continuing treatment?

Obviously this is for people who aren't on any other medication at the same time.

Any advice appreciated. Thank you.

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  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 29,622
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello Whaleroad

    Not been pregnant on it luckily my arthritis didn't start till I had my children, but

    http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/drugs/hydroxychloroquine/pregnancy.aspx

    and

    https://www.evidence.nhs.uk/formulary/bnf/current/10-musculoskeletal-and-joint-diseases/101-drugs-used-in-rheumatic-diseases-and-gout/1013-drugs-that-suppress-the-rheumatic-disease-process/antimalarials/hydroxychloroquine-sulfate

    Slightly seem to contradict each other - both reputable sources for information.

    In your shoes I would get on to your rheumatologist/nurs/GP for advice.

    I hope you get some good advice :)

    Love
    Toni xxx
  • WhaleRoad
    WhaleRoad Member Posts: 32
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi. Thank you for the links. Certainly lots of contradictory advice around.

    Arthritis Research UK says "the benefits usually outweigh any risks", which isn't good enough for me. If there's a risk, I will forego the benefits. But some claim it's safe, in which case I'd rather continue with it.

    I fear "the benefits outweigh the risks" is the line the doctors would take, which won't really help me!

    x
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I think you're right, WhqleRoad. The official line will always err on the side of caution. I guess it has to.

    I applaud your decision to think so carefully about the welfare of any potential foetus. I did too, many years ago. I had one very good pregnancy and one horrible one.

    Nowadays steroids are often givem safely during pregnamcy. Do talk it all over with your rheumatologist.. And good luck.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • WhaleRoad
    WhaleRoad Member Posts: 32
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks stickywicket. It's, for me, a really tough choice. I'd been trying to get pregnant for a while at the time I developed my first symptoms. We decided to postpone until I was feeling better, because being physically well seemed important if I was going to have a baby. I had no idea then that I wouldn't just "get better". Now it's more than two years later and... well, I'm running out of time.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    We don't, alas, 'get better' though we can get much better than we were.

    You are quite right that a baby, and, indeed, growing children, require much strength and stamina. I was fortunate that I could call on my Mum and Dad when times were tough and Mr SW was great.

    I do think a good chat with your rheumatologist might be very helpful.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • WhaleRoad
    WhaleRoad Member Posts: 32
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Yep, might need to find a new rheumatologist first though. A "good chat" is not really on the cards with my current one.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    They are far too busy and all have too many patients so the time allotted per patient isn't often enough. Let him / her know at the outset that you'd like some advice on this and then they can use the time more profitably.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright