More poorly knees

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wazz42
wazz42 Member Posts: 233
edited 4. Dec 2016, 13:41 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi,

I've got RA and fibro, now OA. I had a cat scan when I came down with osteomyelitis in my jaw with no trauma - anyway that's all settled now but the scan also showed OA in both knees, hips, elbows and shoulders!

Now I have fallen down a couple of times and got knee pain - mentioned to GP when I was there for a different issue, it's easy to ignore aches and pains, she ordered an x-ray, I've also had physio, improved movement well but pain still present so now im waiting to see orthopaedic person for next move :wink:

I'm working on posture and trying to keep walking OK to save other joints but my knee doesn't want to be straight any more and I'm wondering whether to leave it like that or try and force it to behave.

Advice much appreciated, great thread on knee replacement, I dont know if that's where I go next.

Wazz

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  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Welcome to my gang, I differ only in having PsA rather than OA. My ankles, knees and hips have OA as a natural result of the PsA and life. I've been using walking aids for years, still do my post-op physio exercises given in 2002, 2003, 2005 and more recently this year (to sort out my Achilles tendonitis). Whenever I am on the move I concentrate on how I am moving and, especially outdoors, the lie of the land; I haven't had a fall for some time now which is a good thing I sleep with a pillow either under or between my knees to ease the stress on the joints, neither knee fully straightens or fully bends and both are bone-on-bone throughout the joint. I was refused replacements back in 2012 because I was too young (aged 53) and now things are far worse everywhere else so I'm undecided about the possible benefit. The pain is constant but I'm used to it, it gives me some very useful feedback as it ramps up warning me it's time to sit and have a rest!

    I know that my range of joint movement in my knees is restricted due to damage and that the exercises I do keep the muscles surrounding them as strong and flexible as possible which means they support them as much as possible. I find my rollator a boon, it has four wheels and a seat, it's a Topro which means I can walk between the bars in a far more upright position than the usual square four-wheeled ones where you have to lean forward a little which adds extra strain to your back. On my better days I also focus on trying to do the heel-to-toe rolling foot movement which is essential for better walking but I confess sometimes it is far from easy. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi,

    Thanks for that, I have thought our paths have been somewhat similar - I left work in 2002. Today my 'good' knee is the most painful, can't win!

    I do use a walking stick though try not to at home, the furniture is well placed and I'm good at standing still after standing up so I don't get dizzy. I might look at 2 sticks - especially if knee 2 is going to continue giving me gip

    :snowball-fight:
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    wazz42 wrote:
    I'm working on posture and trying to keep walking OK to save other joints but my knee doesn't want to be straight any more and I'm wondering whether to leave it like that or try and force it to behave.

    I think what you're doing is good but it's a matter of how far to take it. Trying to keep the knee straight is a good thing to do but probably best not to force it too much. What did your physio say about it?

    Pain is normal in my book. I can't remember painfree and I don't see the point in trying. It's just a matter of degrees.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Firstly, apologies, I meant RA not OA, I should have double-checked my typing before posting. :oops: Secondly, thank you for recalling that our conditions are similar in nature, it's nice to be remembered.

    Sticks have a role to play but elbow crutches give me a greater sense of security and support, especially outdoors when things are slippy with wet leaves or ice. I have my two pine NHS walking sticks for use indoors when things are grim (they live next to the bed for use first thing in the morning) but I find the handles awkward, I tend to hold them with the curve pointing forwards rather than behind. I also have indoor crutches plus a pair that live in the car along with the rollator. I need to buy some more ice grippers so your thread is a timely reminder, thank you! Furniture is handy at times but I am always wary about how much stress I place on wash basins, towel rails and other things which were not designed to be used as supports but which are grabbed regardless! I forgot to say that I have OA in my left shoulder as a result of breaking my left upper humerus in January 2014 - would you believe it I tripped over the side of my rollator? Idiot. :roll:

    Pain is a fact of our arthritic lives, what is more challenging is how we face, deal with and cope with it. I prefer to keep my pain relief to a minimum because that leaves me room to manoeuvre for the rougher times (which still occur despite the meds for the PsA). What are you taking for the RA? I'm on injected meth and humira which are nicely controlling my PsA; needless to say they don't affect the effects of the OA, that's where the cocodamol and occasional diclofenac come in handy. There are all kinds of things we can do to help ourselves, heat, ice, rest, exercise of the right kind and for some diet: I know that pickle and pickles aggravate my OA, so if I indulge I know what to expect, but the fact remains this dross is here to stay because we have more than one kind of dross to manage. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben