Hello from another newbie

littlemimmy
littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
edited 9. Mar 2017, 16:57 in Say Hello Archive
Hello everyone. I'm so pleased to find somewhere so supportive and understanding!

My name is Kay, I'm female, 31 years old, and I live in Worcestershire. I've had problems with my joints, and particularly my hips, for most of my life, but it's only recently that anyone has actually looked into it!

Turns out I have RA, and quite possibly another inflammatory arthritis as well. I've been on methotrexate for a few years (I was already taking it for psoriasis and morphoea before I was diagnosed with RA last autumn), and had an MRI last week to try to find out what is going on with my spine and shoulders.

Having only been diagnosed last year, I'm looking forward to finding out how everyone copes, as I am really struggling at the moment.

Thank you!
Kay

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Kay,

    It's lovely to meet you, glad that you've found the forum, I'm sure you will soon feel at home and be posting on a few threads!

    There are a few areas where people struggle, pain, stiffness, lifestyle changes as well as the feelings of anger, frustration. Post on the Living with arthritis area indicating which aspects you feel most in need of attention.

    Here's a great booklet on understanding for those newly diagnosed
    https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/do-i-have-arthritis/publications/299-understanding-arthritis

    Take care
    Yvonne x
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for your reply, Yvonne, I really appreciate it. Thank you for the link to the booklet too. I have read quite a lot on the internet, but the booklet is really clear and helpful.

    I'm looking forward to participating in the message boards, although I think it'll have to wait until I have the energy!

    Thank you again,
    Kay
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, it's nice to meet you but I am sorry you have had to find us. My arthritic troubles began back in 1997 with a swelling left knee, I began treatment in 2002 and was eventually classified as having some form of auto-immune inflammatory arthritis. That label changed in the autumn of 2006 when my palms and soles obliged with a bout of pustular psoriasis so I am now accurately labelled as having psoriatic arthritis (PsA, the label changed but not the meds, I take injected meth and humira). There are around 300 kinds of auto-immune inflammatory conditions so it can be tricky to narrow down what is going on. You say you have psoriasis so, to my way of thinking, PsA is the more likely culprit for you but auto-immune arthritis has no rhyme nor reason.

    I was born with eczema and then developed asthma so more auto-immune nonsense rocking up was not a surprise. I will soon be starting my 21st year of this malarkey and have gone on to develop OA thanks to the joint damage caused by the PsA so I've won the arthritic lottery - now to win one that's more rewarding! I wish you well. DD
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello dreamdaisy, and thank you for the welcome.

    What a horrible lottery to win! How on earth do you manage?!

    I have considered PsA, and the first doctor I saw about my hip pain also wondered about it, but I've never had the painful toes, so have always rejected the possibility. I do have bad pitting on my fingernails though.

    I suppose (hope!) the MRI will reveal the cause of the problem.

    Anyway, I'm prattling on now, but I just wanted to say thank you for the welcome.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,102
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello from me, too, littlemimmy :D

    I think we all like to have a name for things. It makes us feel more in control. But, in the not-so-wonderful world of inflammatory arthritis, it doesn't always happen and, when it does, the name sometimes changes. I was originally diagnosed with Stills Disease at 15. That has now morphed into RA. The good thing is that the meds are really the same whatever type we have.

    I hope you can get some answers, though, for your own peace of mind.

    (Does PsA usually result in painful toes? I didn't know that.)
  • barbara12
    barbara12 Member Posts: 21,276
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Kay ..the others have given you lots of info, I just want to welcome you to this forum..using the search at the top of the forum is much better than googling things..hope you get all the info you need..
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you everyone, I really appreciate all your messages.
    (Does PsA usually result in painful toes? I didn't know that.)
    Everything I've read mentions painful, swollen toes, but as with all arthritis, who really knows?!

    Thank you for the links Sharon. The fatigue one is especially helpful because I keep feeling kind of pathetic for not being able to do anything, so it's reassuring to read about it.

    Everyone is so friendly and nice; I'm so glad I signed up!

    Thank you,
    Kay
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    PsA is supposed to attack the smaller joints first, so fingers and toes can be early casualties; nails can also suffer from ridging and pitting. I bucked the trend on both fronts: mine began with my left knee and my nails are generally OK although my fingernails fall apart every three months or so and with some style. I also lose toe nails every now and again.

    I know my life would be a deal easier to enjoy and live without having arthritis but that isn't my lot. I could be miserable about it but who would that help? DD
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    "With some style"! :lol: That gave me a much-needed chuckle! I can just imagine!

    All the types of arthritis really like to keep us on our toes (or off them sometimes!), but I'm trying to stay positive.

    I've joined my local NRAS group and went to a meeting last night, which was very positive and the lady who runs it is very energetic and positive, so that's good. Between that and coming here, I'm feeling a lot better about my arthritis at the moment.
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Well, I was feeling positive, but then I looked up my MRI results (I have full online access to my medical records) and they didn't really show anything except a prominent spinal canal. I'm half pleased because it means that I don't have any sacroilitis or spondylotropathy, but if that's the case then why do I have so much pain in my back?!

    Sorry, just need to vent. Feel really conflicted about this, and annoyed that I've basically wasted an MRI scan that someone else could have had.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,102
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    No, no, no! You have not 'wasted an MRI scan'. You have got valuable information from it. Just because the answer is negative does not mean it's useless. Mind you, I do hope you have had access to the report on your scan, not just the scan itself. Reading such things accurately requires much training.

    Why do you have back pain if you don't have arthritis in your back? Well, you have it elsewhere. It might well be the knock on effect of one achey joint throwing others out ie we try to save ourselves from pain in one place and, by doing so, create a strain elsewhere. Arthritis is never simple. Alas :wink:

    I hope you soon get some proper answers.
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you stickywicket, i really appreciate your reply, and it's made me feel a lot better.

    Yes, it's the report I had, with a letter from my consultant to my GP. The scan wasn't attached, which is a shame as I would love to see it (the human body is fascinating, and how often do we get to see inside our own bodies?!).

    What you say about the knock on effect makes a lot of sense, and the speaker at the meeting I went to last night also said that, and that stress, anxiety and depression can all cause pain as well.

    I am incredibly lucky to have a very supportive partner who dried my tears and gave me a back massage this evening, so between that and your message, I can go to bed pretty happy.

    Thank you again.

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