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Waiting to get on with my life......

Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
edited 9. Mar 2017, 12:31 in Community Chit-chat archive
After an appointment early January with the surgeon he decided to refer me for shoe inserts, I am 3rd next on the list for an appointment in July, hopefully.... just as well its only pain.


This method was last tried in 2004 without success, I seem to be having a groundhog day! Sorry, decade.

Comments

  • barbara12barbara12 Posts: 20,777
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Oh Airwaves that is such a long way off..like you say its only pain... :roll: could you not try the ready made ones from the chemist..or memory insoles..till they send for you..
    Love
    Barbara
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Because I have arther in all my joints the insoles just give me more pain which is why they couldn't help last time. Change my shoes and I get pain elsewhere because the status quo is upset, wear the same shoes and for instance my ankle pain will subside but never dissapear. Change one thing and somewhere in my joints the pain will change.

    Because its oa the pain level changes, at the moment I'm getting numb areas and hot flushes because my spinal cord is being agitated by the pressure on it from oa in the joints.

    Life is wonderful eh!
  • frogmortonfrogmorton Posts: 25,606 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sounds really awful. Hot flushes are really nastier than people who don't have them realise.

    I totally get the it that one thing being changed affects a joint somewhere further along :roll:

    I hope your appointment comes round soon :(

    Love

    Toni xx
    Love

    Toni xxx
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,968 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm sorry things are so tough, Airwave, but please don't write off the orthotic insoles. They have come a long way since 2004 and have much better cushioning.

    I am reliant on not only the insoles but also surgical shoes. I can't use ordinary shoes so things have been a bit difficult for me this last month as one pair is in for repair. Having to wear just one pair of shoes for a month, rather than alternating daily, does find all the bits that that particular pair irritates. I get my other ones back on Friday.

    I hope we'll both find things better after our visits to the orthotist.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Sticky, Hope you get your comfy shoes back. I've been relying on the same type of textile walking shoes for about 5 years now, they last about 6 months then get consigned to garden use, I buy them in the winter sales. Yes, I expect the insoles are better now, by the time they arrive I shall indeed need them.

    I expect it will all come out in the wash, I hate waiting, you wait for everything when you're chronically ill, not good for the impatient who want to be proactiv and get on with life, it drags you down.


    :sun:
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,968 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    A few tips from one who wishes she didn't know quite so much about this topic :wink:

    1. Use the time, between now and your appointment to note and list all the sore bits, not just on your feet but where you feel that walking badly impacts on eg shins, knees etc.

    2. Look at the soles of your shoes to see where you wear them down most and make a note of that, too.

    3. On the day, wear a typical, favourite pair of shoes that support your feet as much as possible. Trainers are usually good. Lace-ups are usually better than slip-ons.

    4. If they give you the boxes of polystyrene stuff to stand in make as clear an impact as you can and stand as firmly and far down as you can. I always stand up for this bit even though that means I have to hang on to something - sometimes the head of the kneeling orthotist :oops:

    It's true that waiting is bad for us. I usually find I have a few more bits for the shoes to deal with by the time I finally get them. However, I have to remember that the good old NHS is free at the point of delivery. My son, in USA, had to treat his own finger injury when he discovered his health insurance didn't cover sports injuries. A cricket ball had dislocated his finger and sliced through to the bone. Luckily, he had a heart surgeon on his team who administered some good first aid :roll:
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks Sticky, noted.
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