Flare and uncontrollable crying

LisaKesterDodgson
LisaKesterDodgson Member Posts: 38
edited 13. Apr 2017, 08:53 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi,
I'm going through a bad flare right now. The worst in 17 years of this disease. This morning I went to do a blood test and was in so much distress that I started crying and couldn't stop. Uncontrollable sobbing in front of everyone. I completely lost the plot. I've been on methotrexate for 17 years and plaquenil was added about 5 years ago. I know that some people do get depressed with plaquenil. Has anyone any advice?

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,219
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It might be that some get depressed on hydroxy though I never have in many years. Why hydroxy? Arthritis itself is a huge cause of depression especially when we are flaring. Why not give our lovely Helpline people a call? Talk about it to people who understand. Talk to us, too. We do get it. The meds might well need tweaking but a bad flare is enough to to floor anyone emotionally as well as physically. ((( )))
  • TheLordFlasheart
    TheLordFlasheart Member Posts: 302
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Lisa,

    Sorry to hear you going through a bad flare up right now, were all here for you.
    I have OA of my left knee, had it now for going on 10 years, and I often struggle with flare ups, as they seem to occure more often and when the weather is damp.
    I know it can be so hard (i'll admit to breaking down infront oy my parents once), but I try and use distraction such as reading or listen to music.
    As for the plaquenil, I don't really know but im sure there are others who are on it, or have who can give more advie.

    Just remember, your not alone here. Were all in the same boat, and understand what your going through.

    Best of wishes

    Alastair
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Good morning LisaKesterDodgson

    I am so sorry to hear you are flaring badly at the moment.

    It certainly sounds as though you need support and letting it out on here is a good place. I don't know whether you would be interested in going to an A/C branch meeting to meet other people in 'real life' who have arthritis?

    https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/our-services-and-support/branches-and-groups

    and

    https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/in-your-area

    Our helpline number is: 0808 800 4050 and a telephone call might also be an idea.

    Finally I hope you have been in touch with your rheumatology team and that was maybe why the blood test? If you don't have an imminent appointment maybe a telephone call to book one might be wise?

    Take care of yourself.

    Ellen
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, I am so sorry to read your post and that things are so very bad for you at the moment. I think arthritis can present a double whammy, it not only affects us physically but it can also affect us mentally; I plunged into depression when OA was diagnosed in 2011, I thought I had enough going on with the PsA and then it all became that little bit harder and I needed some help.

    To this day I take a small daily dose of Citalopram, an anti-depressant, and I am sure it helps me cope better with the trials and tribulations of living with arthritis. I do not regard it as a thing to be ashamed of, those unaffected by either arthritis or depression do not understand how tough it can be for us to cope on a daily basis. My late Ma became somewhat creaky with age, which gave her some insight on the former, but she was of the generation that didn't have time for depression - she viewed it as a choice. It isn't.

    I hope you will chat things over with your GP, they are the best placed to advise you. We cannot advise as such but we can support because we too are in very similar boats to yours. Take care, coddle yourself, be kind to yourself and please let us know how things go. I wish you well. DD
  • stremlett
    stremlett Member Posts: 37
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm so sad that you are having a really tough flare-up at the moment. Please don't be embarrassed at sobbing and 'loosing the plot', it's entirely natural. When we hurt enough we react to that. I hope you feel a bit easier soon. Sue
  • LisaKesterDodgson
    LisaKesterDodgson Member Posts: 38
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi everyone,
    Thanks so much for all your kind words and advice, you've certainly lifted my spirits.
  • MissKat
    MissKat Member Posts: 124
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Awh yes goodness me we have all been there, I am also going through a bad flare at the moment - the worst since it all kicked off 8 years ago I reckon.

    It really does knock one back emotionally as well as the obvious physical difficulties.

    My husband found me sobbing my eyes out because I couldn't put my socks on, it was the final straw that broke the proverbial back for me, and whilst I felt silly for crying at such a silly little thing, I felt so much better for having a good old sob!

    I also sobbed in front of the poor guy doing my bloods recently - all he did was ask how I was! And, whilst I felt a bit silly again I'm sure they have seen it all before.

    I don't know about you, but I find myself trying to hold it all together and get on with looking after the kiddos, and everyday life that at some point it's going to have to snap isn't it?!

    So sorry you're having such a rough time of late, please know that we are all here for you and completely understand how you're feeling.

    And if it helps, my husband reminded me when I was feeling silly for crying about the socks - he once cried because we'd run out of raspberry jam! And he doesn't have any illness as an excuse [emoji23]

    Big hugs x


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  • LisaKesterDodgson
    LisaKesterDodgson Member Posts: 38
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi MissKat,
    Thanks so much for your post. Whenever I see a jar of raspberry jam I'll think of your husband sobbing his heart out.
    I do find it hard to not breakdown when people ask me how I am - it seems to trigger the tears. Sometimes it's easier not to talk, but then that's not a good thing either.
    Anyway feeling much more positive today. 😄 :bee: I live in Italy and it's been a wonderful sunny day like summer!
    Ciao!
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I agree that it can be hard when people ask how you are when things are not going well: yes, they are only oiling the social wheels but sometimes even faux interest can be too much. This is sort of relevant and not. :wink:

    Weeks after my father died I found myself in the bread aisle in Sainsbury's, holding a packet of all-butter croissants and crying. His nickname for them was 'crossings' and the stress of his final week came flooding back. A complete stranger, a man I'd never met before and have never seen again, took me in his arms and let me cry myself out. He didn't say much, just 'Hello' and 'OK?' when I'd finished. I think that the forum is like my stranger, there when needed even though we don't know each other.

    I am pleased that you are feeling more positive, that is a good thing. When I'm feeling low I remember the words of Khalil Gibran: the deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain. DD
  • MissKat
    MissKat Member Posts: 124
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Ohhhhh Italy! So jealous! Send us some warm weather & sunshine please! Glad to hear you're feeling more positive today [emoji4]

    DD I love that quote - thanks for sharing x


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