What would make an ideal lavatory?

dreamdaisy
dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
edited 23. Apr 2017, 03:00 in Living with Arthritis archive
Sticky's post about being locked in the lavatory set me a-thinking and I have come up with some ideas.

1. A sliding door. I find the necessarily wide doors difficult to open when I'm on my sticks because they mostly open towards one so I have to shuffle backwards (let's face it, there are times when I struggle with shuffling forwards). I have also nudged people on leaving the lavatory (even though I cautiously open the door) because I cannot see who is where. I think a sliding door solves this and would be activated by sitting or standing within a certain zone: once the lavatory is occupied this mechanism would be automatically disabled (oooh, wrong choice of words there, sorry :oops: )

2. A height adjustable throne (now that's a challenge for a plumber!) I am not as tall as I used to be but I'm still fairly lengthy. Some have never been lengthy so what suits them doesn't suit me and vice versa. I am still pondering how to adjust the height. Got it: there will be a selection of toilet seat raisers available, prod the one of your choice by any means available and it will swing into position. It will be automatically cleaned and returned to its position when the lavatory is flushed.

3. The rails. Now, I see these as a problem area: they need to be up to allow access for chair users, lowered to aid rising then raised again to permit egress to said chair. (If you are a chair user do I have this sequence correct?) This is where the robot comes in. :) There would be a number of ways to summon said robot (who is concealed in the wall) - a set of buttons at various heights could be pushed by fingers, an elbow or forehead, voice control may also work (simplicity suggests the word 'now' but a giggle might be more fun) and he emerges, drops the rail and retreats for privacy. After proceedings utter another 'now' or giggle and he re-emerges to raise the rail and give a thumbs-up.

4. The flush. Another problem area, methinks, and maybe another role for the rail robot?

5. Two washbasins and two hand-dryers please (not the Dys*n blade efforts, dropping one's hands into those is tricky). One set at chair height, the other at the usual height. For the basins I think lever taps work for everyone but soap dispensers are a different story. I think two mini-robots are the answer here, as soon as the lever tap is operated on either basin it appears from the wall, waits until a hand is held under its nozzle and dispenses a set dose of hand wash: it then returns to its housing.

6. It's time to leave so back to the sliding door. Again I think sitting or standing in a certain zone is the answer but maybe a time-delay between the wash basin robots returning and the door opening is a better answer - at least no innocent passer-by will be injured. :wink:

Am I on the right track? DD

Comments

  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You forgot one job for the robot, bottom wiping!
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The tiresome thing is that a lot of what would make life easier already exists and is being used, but not consistently and not necessarily for accessible toilets. Motion sensors for flushing, soap dispensing, tap operation, hand-drying, are seen more and more in ordinary facilities so why are they not universal(or more widely used at least) where they would be most use?
    Mind you the sensors for flushing do have their drawbacks when installed by the average incompetent(aka man who doesn't hold with reading instructions about correct distances) and subsequently not checked before being signed off. There is one at Kings Cross which flushes when you are sitting on it - I have complained repeatedly(the last time angrily and loudly, coupled with an invitation to the 'supervisor' to go and experience for himself the joys of having one's posterior liberally doused with cold water which may or may not be clean)
    By the way DD I sympathise with your comment about not having the baby change in the accessible cubicle but unfortunately where space and money are short that may be the only way to deal with both requirements.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The sensor thing should be the answer but rarely is. Soap and handcream dispensers with pump actions in close-fitting holders screwed too close to the wall to be operable is another of my pet hates - surely just a little ingenuity is needed to ensure they are set further out.

    A friend of ours with back trouble has one of those very flash (flush? :wink: ) toilets which cleans you with warm water and then dries you with blasts of warm air; she has taken to warning guests because it can take one by surprise! DD
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    All this reminds me of those very scary "superloos" of the 90's
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,219
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was thinking on much the same lines, Slosh. I can cope with the self-flushing ones (when they flush, as required and not prematurely, daffy :shock: ) but I think I want to be in charge of when the door opens. Really, it's not too difficult. Those big levers, on some disabled loos are easy even for me as are ordinary locks that just slide (easily) with a loop handle. They are in many non-disabled loos now.

    I loathe the US 'inclusive' system which doesn't have a separate disabled one just a disabled men's one in the gents and a disabled women's one in the ladies. Fine if you can cope with the lock but, if not, I can hardly ask Mr SW to stand guard within the ladies' loos.
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The US version sounds like a case of solving one(possible) problem by creating another. It does rather assume either that the disabled person is self-sufficient or that a carer is always going to be the same sex as the person being cared for - thereby excluding heterosexual couples(whether in a relationship or not).
    When the(last remaining) public toilets in my home town were revamped separate men's, women's and disabled facilities were replaced by a men's urinal(open 24/7 because of course it's only men who need to pee after hours....) and 2 multipurpose units. The net result is to reduce capacity(from 6 women's cubicles, one disabled and however many gents) to something that can't cope with demand and is not suited to anyone.The rooms are dark,the toilets have no seat and are made of some flecked bright coloured composite material - no way of seeing if it's clean, and I would imagine very unhelpful for those with sight problems trying to sort out which is the rim to sit on and which is the bowl, - and which sadist thought that sitting on a toilet rim is a good experience? They are spacious but that is all they have going for them. The silly thing is that the old toilets were also roomy and in addition to the separate key controlled disabled toilet next door the women's had plenty of circulation space for buggies and wheelchairs and also a large corner cubicle with shelf, wash basin and rails.
    Such is progress - and the power of salespeople to convince town councillors that the replacements we now have were the best solution to the problem of tatty facilities. Pity said councillors never bothered to include the public in their decision making.
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Apparently there was a documentary last week on BBC4 about the history of the toilet, I'm heading over to catch up TV to watch it.

    Just thought I'd let you know
  • AliB
    AliB Member Posts: 41
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It wasn't untill we were looking for a new bathroom that it occurred to me how low toilets were...waking up in the night to pop to the loo could be bit of a trial when your hips stiffen up in bed..then we saw it... a high toilet, fantastic...50cms from ground upwards...so we bought one...well two actually as had a seperate toilet to redo as well...oh so pleased we did... Saga seat our son calls it !! With pending hip op on the horizon there will be no need for a toilet seat extension !! :lol::lol: