Hello

AKAT
AKAT Member Posts: 4
edited 10. May 2017, 06:49 in Say Hello Archive
Hi, I am trying to make the best of two dodgy knees. Severe arthritis in the right knee is causing lots of interuptions in my life in terms of mobility and pain. I have been told a complete knee replacement is the only thing that can be offered. Has anyone else had a complete knee replacement in their fifties? Has it been a positive experience? Looking for some advice from people who have been through the operation.

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,086
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi and welcome to the forums - there are many on here who have had TKR and I'm sure you will find what you want,just ask.
    Al
  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,086
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello AKAT
    welcome to the forums, I am sorry to hear that your knee is giving you so many problems, you might find our booklet on surgery useful https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/treatments-aids-and-equipment/surgery-and-arthritis There are quite a lot of people on here who have had knee replacements, you might like to start a thread in the "living with arthritis forum" as this is where most people chat and support each other.
    Meanwhile you could always phone our Helpline if you have any questions on 0808 800 4050
    Best Wishes
    Sharon
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello AKAT.

    I had two knee replacements aged 31 but I'd had RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis) for 20 years by then. I also had one of them replaced about 10 years ago when it was 27. I'd definitely recommend the op. What are your reservations about it?

    I guess the only argument against having it done at your age is that you might need a revision later. A revision (in this case replacing a replacement) is a bigger op and requires a bigger prosthesis but I've had no problems with mine. When I had my first TKRs I felt that, even if/when they failed, I'd be in my 60s by then and wouldn't need them as much as I did in my 30s with two small children. I was right, of course, though knees are useful at any age :wink: Do I regret any of my ops? Definitely not. Just make sure you do all the physio required.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • AKAT
    AKAT Member Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for replying. Great that you had a positive experience and really pleased you would recommend. I have some reservations as my knee has been operated on in the past because of other non arthritic problems and worried how this fits in with a knee replacement. Also worried about how long it will take to recover and about being off work/out of action. How your mobility compares with before you have it done and if there are things you can no longer do. Suppose I am looking for reassurance that it is a positive step forward. Any advice /experiences would be helpful. Akat
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think most people do see it as very positive. Personally I was just pleased to have two good knees. Having RA virtually everywhere else meant that I wasn't attempting bungee jumping or free fall parachute jumping :wink: but things really were so much better for me.

    I really don't think your previous surgery would make a difference to the outcome but this would definitely be something to discuss with an orthopaedic surgeon. You can talk for nothing. No-one would pressure you into it.

    There is lots of good, trustworthy info here at ARUK. It deals with, among other things, recovery times.

    http://tinyurl.com/pcauw4w
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • AKAT
    AKAT Member Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for the link. Really helpful information and very clear.
    Akat
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You're welcome :D
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran