It's the little things... that annoy me!

littlemimmy
littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
edited 7. Jul 2018, 13:19 in Community Chit-chat archive
Thought I'd start a thread where we could moan about the silly little things that bug us.

This has come about because my partner's father has recently got two lovely chickens, and his son cannot seem to understand that they are female. I don't know why, but it really irritates me. This guy is 23, and it's worrying that he doesn't seem to know that eggs come from female birds. Drives me nuts!
«13

Comments

  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Wait till he finds out which bit of a chicken eggs come from....
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks daffy, we so need a "like" button or something :D

    Bryn
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Maybe because men are usually, (though not always), taller than women Sharon?

    A bow is a lovely idea for your girl dog :D

    Ellen
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    daffy2 wrote:
    Wait till he finds out which bit of a chicken eggs come from....

    Yes, I can't wait! :lol:

    People's preconceptions regarding gender is fascinating, like with Sharon's dogs. My sister has a Staffordshire terrier cross and people always assume that she is male, despite her trendy bandanas! People also assume she's aggressive, which couldn't be further from the truth!
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,428
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Well, if we are going to have a button can we have something other than a 'like' button, I find the whole idea of a 'like' utterly simplistic, how can I roll all of my thoughts about a subject into one undescriptive word. Do I ever get the chance to 'unlike something' or does my reaction to something have to be that chosen by an unnamed software compiler and the same as used by the millions of computer and phone users?

    Down with 'like' buttons! We have a choice, its called language!

    Rant over for today.
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Speaking of rants... My county has a dedicated NHS mental health organisation, to which I was recently referred. I'm a third of the way through a CBT course designed for people with long term health conditions. (Isn't the NHS fantastic?!) 11 people are on my course and only 7 have turned up.

    No wonder the poor NHS is suffering. And no wonder there are huge waiting lists.
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 28,078
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Speaking of rants... My county has a dedicated NHS mental health organisation, to which I was recently referred. I'm a third of the way through a CBT course designed for people with long term health conditions. (Isn't the NHS fantastic?!) 11 people are on my course and only 7 have turned up.

    No wonder the poor NHS is suffering. And no wonder there are huge waiting lists.

    Disgusting!! :shock: They will be forced to stop running these courses if people fail to turn up!! grrrrrrr :x
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,428
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sharon, Thanks for the reply to my rant, I didn't expect a reply but it is pleasing to know that its been read and attention and thought has been paid whether it is right or wrong or clearly nuanced to a bias.

    I doubt if we will get many subjects on here where others don't have another view?

    We do have ways of knowing what other forum users think, (1)we can see the 'read' figures, (2)how high in the list a subject is and (3)how many replies (4) type of replies and (5) content which are often very telling, perhaps these can be enhanced alongside the posts to show users interests?

    I continue my campaign against the banal 'like button.' :mrgreen:
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Only 4 people came to my course this week. Just 4. It's ridiculous. I know we all have long-term medical conditions (I nearly wrote LTMC but have just read stickywicket's post about acronyms!), but none of them had contacted the organisation to say they weren't coming.

    I wish they would come, as I find it very uncomfortable when there are less of us. I like to sit quietly and take it all in, but with less of us there that becomes difficult.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Flies. 'Reality' TV. Windy weather. People who don't have my conditions telling me what to do to get better. Doing shopping lists. Cleaning my glasses. The inefficiency of the repeat prescription service at my GPs. The inability of The Spouse when food shopping to see beyond immediate needs. People who do not indicate at roundabouts. Gravel. DD
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    A perfect list DD! I definitely agree with all of those.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have more.

    Shrieking tennis players, toddlers in restaurants, people who dither (usually at the disembark point on an escalator), those who watch all their shopping go through the till then sort out their bags then pack then begin the hunt for their purse / wallet; slow broadband, people who ring me on my mobile from their mobile whilst they are walking (enough with the puffing and panting), my husband opening crisp packets at the bottom, changing the bedding, Greg Rusedski, opening the bonnet of my car, Robert Peston, tidying up, ITV wrecking sports events with adverts and indifferent pundits, pets' names such as Mr Snookums, Fluffles etc., cats. DD
  • tkachev
    tkachev Member Posts: 8,332
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'd like to add Trick and treaters and noisy music booming from cars to the list.

    I'm sure there are many others but these two drive me mad.

    Elizabeth x
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Flies and wasps. People walking along pavements looking only at their mobile phones. Mothers ignoring their children because they are on their mobile phones. Un-necessary sign posts. The traffic lights in my town (the council adores them, on one stretch of road less than half a mile long there are six sets). People who quote entire posts and then fail to type a reply. Text speak in formal communications, that's bad manners (yup, I'm a grammar dinosaur). Windy weather. DD
  • mig
    mig Member Posts: 7,152
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    People who let their dogs pee up my garden wall.
    Next doors hot tub gurgling morning noon and night.
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    With you on the check out one!
    OK, and I know this will annoy some but the term "fur babies" for pets.
    Anyone who says "get better soon", or when they haven't seen me for a while "are you better now?"
    People who self-diagnose and then "cure" themselves with vits/diet
    And most of all, all the quacks and charlatons who make money by playing on the emotions of those with chronic disease, things like ASD etc by claiming they have a cure.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Tonight some children are going to a Hallowe'en disco and fireworks are already banging away. WHY? The official dates for these are five and ten days hence - what's the rush? When I was little the celebrations took place on the proper day and happened just the once. Now there is no sense of occasion, no knowledge of why these things happen; why is this going on?

    Commercialisation may be partly to blame but I think it reflects the way society is changing. In my view people are increasingly casual in their approach to both private and public living: some deem it acceptable to be seen in public wearing their pyjamas, to eat as they walk, to spend time on their mobile when eating out thus ignoring the people they are with, my list could go on. :wink: To me that all smacks of a lack of respect for others and the loss of self-respect. Are we losing or have we lost a sense of occasion? I used to look forward to those special events which were not part of normal, every-day life but now? We are confronted by Easter eggs in the shops on Boxing Day, Christmas cards on sale from August, back-to-school stuff before the little darlings have broken up for the summer holidays, fireworks for at least two weeks either side of November 5th, the American-influenced brou-ha-ha of Hallowe'en etc. Life passes fast enough without this artificial, manufactured 'excitement' which means that by the time the actual day comes everyone is fed up to the back teeth with the whole thing. DD
  • Kitty
    Kitty Member Posts: 3,575
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The 4 neighbours that share the back alley that runs behind our houses. All young and able bodied, who walk through the fallen leaves, and rubbish that blows down there, without noticing it. When able, I used to share this task with my husband. But now t120007 he's the only one who does it. :( :x :roll:
  • frogmorton
    frogmorton Member Posts: 28,078
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    dreamdaisy wrote:
    Tonight some children are going to a Hallowe'en disco and fireworks are already banging away. WHY? The official dates for these are five and ten days hence - what's the rush? When I was little the celebrations took place on the proper day and happened just the once. Now there is no sense of occasion, no knowledge of why these things happen; why is this going on?

    Commercialisation may be partly to blame but I think it reflects the way society is changing. In my view people are increasingly casual in their approach to both private and public living: some deem it acceptable to be seen in public wearing their pyjamas, to eat as they walk, to spend time on their mobile when eating out thus ignoring the people they are with, my list could go on. :wink: To me that all smacks of a lack of respect for others and the loss of self-respect. Are we losing or have we lost a sense of occasion? I used to look forward to those special events which were not part of normal, every-day life but now? We are confronted by Easter eggs in the shops on Boxing Day, Christmas cards on sale from August, back-to-school stuff before the little darlings have broken up for the summer holidays, fireworks for at least two weeks either side of November 5th, the American-influenced brou-ha-ha of Hallowe'en etc. Life passes fast enough without this artificial, manufactured 'excitement' which means that by the time the actual day comes everyone is fed up to the back teeth with the whole thing. DD

    I hope you feel much better after that DD :wink:

    I agree 100% with all of your points too :D

    KathT
    your neighbours are just selfish plain selfish :x

    Love

    Toni xx
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The sun. At this time of year bright and sunny days are always welcome but, because the sun is so low, it's far too strong. If, like me, you forget to take your sunspecs when venturing out and about you are left with golden orbs burned onto your retinas for far too long because it's cunningly placed to be too low for the sun visor when driving . . . DD
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I work really hard, and have been trying to do two people's jobs since I started my new job in November, since my colleague left work unexpectedly the week after I started, and today I had to field a complaint from a very angry man, but absolutely none of his problems were my fault!

    I've tried so hard to help everyone out, and yet I still get a load of abuse for everyone else's shortcomings! Just feel really rubbish now and so annoyed with them all!
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,428
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Can I add in:-

    1. All those drivers who do ten mph less than every speed limit, don't stay in the lane markers, refuse to leave less than 200m between cars, drive across two lanes so you can't pass them before lanes converge, excess speeding, poorly adjusted lights, olderdrivers who are clearly beyond coping with modern driving, need I go on?

    2. tba!
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The ads for oak furniture.

    Airwave? I completely agree but recognise that one day it's more than likely that I will be that driver and not know it - it will be the rest of the world that is driving too fast. DD
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    All those drivers who do ten mph less than every speed limit,
    Well, I'd rather that than the other way round(especially if they're behind me!). However the variation on that which bugs me is those who toddle along at 30 mph until they come to a village with a 30 speed limit at which point they speed up.....Many of the roads round here are narrow, windy and not good visibility so I can understand being cautious especially if on unfamiliar territory, but why they think it's safer in the villages I don't know; the roads are still narrow with poor visibility, but with the added interest of pedestrians, parked cars etc.
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    daffy2 wrote:
    However the variation on that which bugs me is those who toddle along at 30 mph until they come to a village with a 30 speed limit at which point they speed up.....
    It's bizarre! I also can't stand the people who do 40mph in a 60mph area, but then carry on doing 40mph in a 30mph area! Speed limits exist for a reason!!

Who's Online

7
chrisb
chrisb
mlabib221
mlabib221
+5 Guests