Electric bicycles

susie51
susie51 Member Posts: 57
edited 28. Jan 2018, 04:21 in Community Chit-chat archive
Hi I'm 66 years and looking for information on electric bikes as a means of transport.....I don't feel at all confident, but I have had two hips and one knee replaced and am hoping for my other TKR will be within the next two years after which I won't be able to drive for a while which frankly scares me to death! I was hoping these ops would help me become more mobile but unfortunately my ankles/feet have started to play up and prevent comfortable walking or being able to take part in activities with my family. So any one out there with any experience with these?

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,708
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The short answer is 'no', Susie but I have found some former thread which might help you to decide https://arthritiscareforum.org.uk/search.php?keywords=electric+bike&terms=all&author=&sc=1&sf=all&sk=t&sd=d&sr=posts&st=0&ch=300&t=0&submit=Search

    I, too, have the full house with hips and knees and find it's my feet that get in the way of many things now. Unfortunately, my hands couldn't deal with a bike. I've contemplated a disability scooter but it's not just the expense of the scooter but also of modifying the garage door. (I think electric doors cost around £1,000.)

    Anyway, I do wish you well with the venture. I believe, in addition to arthritis considerations, the type of battery makes a big difference too. As with many things I'd guess you could buy cheaper on the internet but really require the expertise of a specialist shop.
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,424
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think I may have the t shirt for this adventure! I spent a lot of money on an electric bike and wore the battery out in two years, the cost of replacing it was more than the cost of the bike. After spending all that time on the bike I was fitter so brought a middle of the range sit up and beg Raleigh aluminium framed bike with 21 gears on. As long as I stay on reasonably flat roads I can cope, arther is still with me and I'm on a long downhiĺl slide but I enjoy a ride.
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,424
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You may be intersted in a conversion kit from www.hobbyking.com (UK warehouse) a new wheel with motor in and parts to complete so you use your bike and convert to electric assistance.
  • EB1953
    EB1953 Member Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have just bought a second hand one, to hopefully help with my recovery after TKR. I can't use it just yet as the operation was only three weeks ago, and I am still working on the excises for walking properly first, but it is there waiting for me when I am ready to progress. :sun:
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,424
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Good luck with the venture, let us know how you get on.
  • mellman01
    mellman01 Member Posts: 5,303
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You get what you pay for with these things, the key is voltage, amperage of the battery, and motor size, the higher the voltage the better, same goes battery capacity normally shown in amps, 36Volt is a good yardstick to go by, the higher the voltage the easier it will be on the battery, as for battery amp 9-11+. Motor watts is another thing to consider, 300 watts is ample, again the lower the wattage the more the motor will need to work, motors also contain Neodymium magnets, when they get hot say 80C or above the magnetism is destroyed so its new motor time, again as with the battery bigger is better but the cost will go up, I known people buy cheaper bikes and find the batteries and motors to burn out within a year of purchase, as the old saying goes buy cheap buy twice, if I were going to get a bike I'd not look at anything under £1000.

    So we have.
    Battery capacity. 9-11amps +
    Battery voltage. Don't go under 36V
    Motor wattage.250-300.
  • susie51
    susie51 Member Posts: 57
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    mellman01 wrote:
    You get what you pay for with these things, the key is voltage, amperage of the battery, and motor size, the higher the voltage the better, same goes battery capacity normally shown in amps, 36Volt is a good yardstick to go by, the higher the voltage the easier it will be on the battery, as for battery amp 9-11+. Motor watts is another thing to consider, 300 watts is ample, again the lower the wattage the more the motor will need to work, motors also contain Neodymium magnets, when they get hot say 80C or above the magnetism is destroyed so its new motor time, again as with the battery bigger is better but the cost will go up, I known people buy cheaper bikes and find the batteries and motors to burn out within a year of purchase, as the old saying goes buy cheap buy twice, if I were going to get a bike I'd not look at anything under £1000.

    So we have.
    Battery capacity. 9-11amps +
    Battery voltage. Don't go under 36V
    Motor wattage.250-300.

    I stumbled across this post looking through after being away for a while and I'm very pleased to have all the info.....I'm not sure if I'm confident enough to actually get one yet especially as I am waiting for my second knee op but I still have dreams of cycling along the Welsh lanes again, thanks
  • Numptydumpty
    Numptydumpty Member Posts: 6,415
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I bought one off eBay without trying it. Got it home and found I couldn't use it! It had a handlebar twist throttle which I couldn't use because of my wrist fusion. I sold it on and bought a super duper electric scooter. I don't get the exercise on it, but I do get out and about which is the main thing for me.
    Numpty
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,424
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    If I may just add that the answer is not about an electric bike, its about the confidence to get out and be able to return home. Electric batteries and motor will not in themselves 'get you home', you need to plan a very short journey and increase every time you go out.

    Thinking along other lines, a lightweight comfortable bike will give you as much advantage as a heavy electric bike. Just for instance an electric bike might weigh 24kg, a lightweight bike 13kg or an all carbon bike 6kg or less. I went for the lightweight bike which cost less than 1/4 of the e bike, has 21 speeds and is a comfortable sit up and beg position, something most e bikes aren't.

    The answer will be different for all, hope I made you think.

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