Advice please: Guaranteed Interview Scheme

littlemimmy
littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
Hello everyone, I hope this message finds you well.

I am applying for a research fellow position at a university (I'm unlikely to get it, as I don't have enough experience for the role, but I have some unusual credentials, so it's worth a shot).

The university has a Guaranteed Interview Scheme for people who are disabled and meet the criteria for the role. I don't know whether they decide on the criteria for 'disabled', as the link with it doesn't really help, so I'm not sure whether I need to receive Pip or something (I've not bothered to apply yet; it sounds like a lot of hassle!).

But, these issues aside, my question is; should I go for the scheme? It should guarantee me an interview, because I do meet the criteria for the role. But will they give me an interview because they have to, but actually be even less likely to employ me because I used the scheme?

I almost see it as an unfair advantage if I do go for it, but should I be making the most of this basket of rotten apples and taking an opportunity?

Help! What should I do?! The closing date is Tuesday, and I've only just found the advert. Any advice will be hugely appreciated!

Comments

  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,239
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    To my way of thinking (and I should point out I haven't been in the job market for years) you're over-thinking this.

    You've no way of knowing how they will consider you as regards will they see a disabled interviewee as a plus or minus. You can only suck it and see.

    Hundreds of years ago :wink: I was registered disabled. Now there is no register. People self-define. However, I would imagine some confirmation from your doc wouldn't go amiss. Maybe you won't have time before the application but you could always get it before the actual interview.

    Hope it goes well if you decide to go for it.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you so much for your reply, I really appreciate it.

    You're probably right, and I'm probably over thinking it.

    I still haven't decided what to do, but am currently leaning towards not going for the scheme. Oh, I just don't know!
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,713
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I would tend to agree with the over-thinking. You have a lot to deal with on top of everyday life so I don't see that a bit of a leg-up to get an interview is an unfair advantage. The interviewers could still decide that your lack of relevant experience rules against you, but it might be that face to face they decide that you could actually be suitable/worth taking a chance on. In neither case need 'disability' be an issue, better for everyone. If it goes well you have an opportunity which might not otherwise have come your way and the institution has a candidate it might not otherwise have considered.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,239
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    If you fancy the job and if you're someone who interviews well, why not go for it? You don't have to accept it if offered.

    Or, might you take a refusal very much to heart and feel it personally?

    Or, do you just not 'feel disabled enough'? Surely your GP could help there.

    (I think I'm sounding a bit negative but, really, I'm trying to help :roll: )
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for your replies, I really appreciate it. As I was writing the personal statement bit I started to wonder whether I even want this job! Really, I just want something better paid because my income is ridiculously low.

    I do take rejection/refusals badly, but if I'm not even sure I want the job, then I don't suppose I shall mind that much.

    I definitely don't feel disabled enough, and do feel like it would give me an advantage that I'm not sure I should be entitled to.

    Thank you both for your advice; I really appreciate it so much.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,239
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I promise this is my final word :lol:

    Employers must, by law (I think), take a certain percentage of disabled employees. So you could actually be doing them a favour by rocking up if they don't need to find lots of adaptions for you.

    Your choice, littlemimmy. Only you know what's best for you - and that's all we care about :D
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You're all so kind! I've sent off my application, but realised as soon as I clicked submit that I don't remember whether I've selected the scheme or not! I think I did select it, because I remember filling in the bit that came up, but I may have unselected it at some point during my indecisiveness!

    Well, we'll soon find out I suppose!
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I would say go for it, interview experience is always useful and if you don't get the job remember you are entitled to ask for feedback which can be very helpful.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • littlemimmy
    littlemimmy Member Posts: 111
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you. I usually make sure I ask for feedback, as it can be very helpful (and sometimes not!), but I find it more difficult these days when you apply for jobs online and therefore don't have any contact details for anyone. Very frustrating!