Evening all

jennyflowerblue
jennyflowerblue Member Posts: 3
edited 8. Sep 2017, 11:30 in Say Hello Archive
I was diagnosed six weeks ago with sero-neg/inflammatory arthritis. I am on Hydroxychloroquine which makes me a bit nauseous and had a big shot of steroids in my bum prior to our holiday which eased the symptoms in my hands for a while. Not seeing the rheumatologist until the end of Nov. and feel a little(!) lost. So unsure about how this condition might develop or indeed may go into remission-interested to hear from anyone else with a similar diagnosis or any genreral tips on staying positive and managing the tiredness and pain with the demands of a family and work. Looking forward to geeting to know you, Jenny

Comments

  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,080
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Jenny
    welcome to the community, I am sorry to hear that you have recently been diagnosed and I am not surprised you are feeling a bit lost. Being diagnosed is a lot to take in.
    You might find it useful to have a look at the section on our website about living with arthritis as there are lots of tips there https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/living-with-arthritis

    Please feel free to ask as many questions as you like and I am sure our members will be along shortly to share their experience with you
    Best Wishes
    Sharon
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,173
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello jennyflowerblue and welcome :) A diagnosis is always a bit of a mixed blessing. It's good to know what's wrong but did it have to be that :? At least you're diagnosed and on medication quickly. That always helps. He sooner we're diagnosed the better the outcome.

    Hydroxy is quite a mild DMARD. I've been on it for years along with methotrexate and they work well for me. If you feel nauseous on it try always taking it with a little food. It can help.

    It's absolutely normal to wonder and worry what the future may hold. Alas, there are few answers. We are all different and react differently to both the disease and the meds. One thing you can be fairly sure of is that your future will be better than mine was as, when I was diagnosed, aged 15 in 1961, there were no decent DMARDS on offer. And yet.....despite hip and knee replacements and a multiplicity of other joint issues, I reckon I've had a very good life. I got my degree, married, had two kids and now travel to California each year to visit one son and grandson. Life after diagnosis (Mine is RA) can be very good.

    Of course it was tough when my boys were young and, in the absence of DMARDS, there was no question of working other than voluntary work. You will learn to pace yourself, to rest when you need to, to delegate (and so teach your kids valuable lessons while restraining yourself from using them as unpaid skivvies :lol: ) and to ensure you get all the help at work that you need and are entitled to.

    Staying positive is like a muscle – use it or lose it. Keep on working hard at it but don't be afraid of having a brief dip in the pool of self-pity occasionally. Tell us about it when that happens as we do understand and will sympathise and empathise.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • jennyflowerblue
    jennyflowerblue Member Posts: 3
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Bless you and thanks for your encouragment. It is good to know what is making me feel so awful and there were worse things it could have been for sure. It is great to hear that you are leading such a full life with family and travel. I am sorry the meds weren't available for you in the early days and you have suffered because of this. I do eat with the Hydroxy- never need inviting twice to eat- and it does help, it does seem some manufacturers are worse than others. There is lots to be thankful for still isn't there? I think I just need to hear 'it will all be alright' and that's what I hear from your kind message. My family are a bit lost too at the moment- but making the leap from- Mum's not so well to-perhaps I could occasionaly lift a finger- hasn't actually happened yet! Thanks again for taking the time to reply. xxxxx
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,173
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    My family are a bit lost too at the moment

    Arthritis does affect every member of a family albeit in different ways. I don't think there's a blueprint. We just have to deal with things as they arise, try not to moan too much but equally try not to be so stoical they haven't a clue what's going on with us because that way we can start to feel very isolated and resentful of our isolation while they, too, feel shut out of our lives. It's tricky but very worth the effort.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
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