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wrists and fingers

lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
edited 28. Nov 2017, 04:25 in Living with Arthritis archive
Anyone have any advice for pain in my wrists please? I struggle to open these horrible plastic bottle with the "squeeze tops" I am lucky my husband can do them for me. Also can openers. Holding a fork to whisk things is also getting painful. Doctor just says take paracetamol and am allowed to take up to 8 a day. I avoid this as much as possible. Do the copper bracelets help? Thank you

Comments

  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Any guests to my house (including my postman) are asked to open bleach bottles etc. and woe betide The Spouse if he seals them properly after use. I have discs of that rubbery non-slip matting that you can buy to stop things sliding on dashboards, they are good for jars etc. As far as whisking I use an electric hand blender when things are rough, that completely removes the strain. Veg are scrubbed with a scourer pad rather than peeled, I damp dust rather than polish. My vacuums are cordless to save battling with the flex and plug but I do have some plastic plug loops (bought from Betterware) which are means plugs can be gripped and pulled out more easily. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you for the suggestions. I do use electric whisk but sometimes its just the hassle of setting it up ( me being lazy!) Hubby comes in handy as a bottle opener
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    You're more than welcome, I hope some were useful. Paracetamol has its uses but for me it lacks sufficient 'clout' to make enough of a difference: it can also have a deleterious effect on the liver if too much is taken. I view pain relief as an essential rather than a luxury, why hurt more than necessary? My GP prescribes cocodamol for my OA (a mixture of paracetamol and codeine) and I keep my consumption to the minimum so I can feel the feedback from my affected joints so I know when to stop and have a rest.

    I didn't realise you already had an electric gizmo, mine lives in a cupboard to save counter space, it's a stick blender and is handy for so many things. Having stopped work back in June this year my husband has only recently been about to ask hence my previous reliance on others - he also grumbles a little whereas my postman always asks if he can help with anything, bless him. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • HobbleHobble Posts: 77
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I would be lost without the one touch tin opener x
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Milk pull-off tops are a nightmare too. Good news is it today is the anniversary since my hip replacement op. It is wonderful. I walk, swim play badminton ( with much more caution!) and I have fun. Just wrists that are a problem so I count myself very lucky. My husband has prostrate cancer which has spread to his bones, He is on hormone injections and so far are holding it at bay. His urologist describes it as a wild dog on a leash. While the leash hold it is okay, if it snaps then they will look at other treatment. So we are very grateful to the NHS. We have had a good 12 months since his diagnosis and hope to continue this way.
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I use a vegetable knife to cut through the milk seal then pull it off from the inside out - much easier. Many congratulations on your hips anniversary, it must be lovely to be able to do all those things! I am sorry about your husband's prostate cancer, I hope he is keeping as well as possible. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • TrishaWTrishaW Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have a great Ninja chopper for all chopping/blending.....very easy to clean and no fiddly bits (and lid easy to shut) You can buy them in many shops but if you get them on QVC you can send it back if it dosn't suit you, even if used.

    If my wrists are sore I wear wrap around neoprolene wrist supports given to me by my OT....very comforting

    Trisha
  • TrishaWTrishaW Posts: 121
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Ooo and I treated myself to an expensive but incredibly light and cordless vacuum cleaner the GTech K9....all my friends have now bought them. It's also bagless but the dust is compacted so it dosn't make a mess everywhere when you empty it (very easy)
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Theres lots of machines to help, the electric can opener is a great help. As regards plastic tops, when you grab hold of them they tend to distort which makes them harder to unscrew or move, often a light touch helps move them. Jars- we have what looks like a giant plastic beerbottle opener which releases the vacuum holding the screw top lid tight, easy peasy.
  • lindamaylindamay Posts: 112
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thank you to everyone for all your suggestions. I will look into them.
    My husband is doing fine at the moment. Hormone injections working so far. He gets sudden bouts of fatigue. He can be okay and doing a job when it very suddenly comes over him and he has to stop and rest. He also complains of hot flushes. We ladies know all about these! Fingers crossed things don't get any worse.
    Thank you again
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,377 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I get hot flushes in my lower legs caused by irritation on my spinal cord, numb patches as well, might be worth mentioning to your GP.
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