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DRIVING

hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
edited 21. Dec 2017, 06:55 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi
Looking for some ideas :? I had a total replacement shoulder in April and was told it would take at least a year to heal [almost eight months ago] I'm coping OK except for driving. I cant drive!!! I cant feed the steering wheel through my hands :shock:

I had an operation on the same shoulder a few weeks before that, and previously a replaced knee {TKR] Does anyone have any idea about gadgets of any sort???? that would help. People that know me will know not to say be patient :lol::lol: That word is not in my dictionary :wink:
Its at least 18 months since I've driven.......don't want to go far but just a little bit of independence would be lovely

Love
Hileena

Comments

  • trepolpentrepolpen Posts: 498
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    take some advice from your physio or OT , here we get advice on Adaptations available through Motobility if you need them ,

    basic advice , Automatic with Powered Steering & power brakes , small hatchback two door because the doors are bigger but find out if any adaptations will help , this is our place in Cornwall

    https://www.cornwallmobility.co.uk/how-we-help/on-the-road/adapting-your-vehicle
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    The most common adaptation is a knob affixed to the wheel but this still requires manoeuvring to turn the wheel (you must also inform the DVLA and your insurers about the adaptation). Once that is fitted I suppose you could try steering one-handed (obviously not using the operated side). The most important aspect of this is that you are not posing a risk to other drivers by your current (and possibly future) inability to fully control the vehicle. DD

    christmas02
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Sorry, but I'm afraid patience is not optional, Hileena. You must tell DVLA of any physical problems that have worsened and then be referred to someone who will assess yourr needs for adapting the car https://www.disabledmotoring.org/motoring/medical-conditions-disabilities-and-driving

    The usual steering adaptation is a knob on the wheel but I could never cope with this as my arms aren't long enough to reach the 12 o'clock position.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • daffy2daffy2 Posts: 1,713
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    There are some circumstances where driverless cars would seem to be a good idea....Pity that's not the thrust of current developments.
    I had an uncle affected by polio who had an adapted car as he had limited upper body strength or control - this was 50 or so years ago - which I think involved a footplate for steering, and a rack of hand operated controls on the front bit of the seat so he could use it without having to lift his arm. It did tend to disconcert other road users as his hands weren't on the wheel...His wife often chose to use the adaptation rather than the wheel(which remained functional), although using the control panel wasn't always as easy when wearing skirt or dress.
  • hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi I will come back to his thread just on my way out now.
    Thought I would mention that I don't get any benefits at all. So things like motobility wouldn't be in the picture [I dont think]
    I'll check the posts when I get home and have another think.
    I thought about the knob and thought it was a good idea and then thought how could I steer using the knob and also use other hand to change gears????
    Its my right shoulder so using the knob with left hand, change gear with right hand :lol::lol::lol:
    I could be wrong but I'll have a think when I come back
    Thanks for your ideas
    Oh Daffy !!!!!! what is a dress. I dont possess one of those :lol:
    I live in trousers and jeans

    Love
    Hileena
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I think your first requirement would be an automatic rather than a car with hears. There are loads of ingenious adaptions available. In my driving days I always had an automatic. The foot pedals were reversed so that I could use my better foot and the handbrake adapted to pull on and push off as I couldn't do the fiddly thumb-pushing-the-top-in thing.

    I know you seem, from what you write, to go everything by either car or scooter. If your mobility is so restricted, why not apply for mobility allowance? Then you could try a motability car.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • GraceBGraceB Posts: 1,598
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi, I think you need to firstly check if you are medically allowed to drive before you attempt to try. Then you could consider changing your car for an adapted automatic one.

    You could also see if you'd be eligible for PIP (via the PIP website) as, without the high rate of mobility element of PIP, you can't get a Motability car. To get a Motability car you'll still have to declare your medical conditions and that you are medically fit to drive. If you want to investigate an adapted automatic car (assuming you are declared as medically fit to drive) have you thought about popping along and seeing the Motability Adviser in a dealership near to you? S/he may be able to point you in the direction of an organisation who could assist with adaptations.

    Would taxis be an alternative in the short-term? At least you could get out then!

    GraceB
    Turn a negative into a positive!
  • hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    Just got back home and noticed the extra messages.
    I'm not sure if you realise I cant get ANY benefits never mind the higher rate. I applied for the lower rate some time back and was refused and applied again and was refused again.
    The only thing I was thinking about was the knob and that type of thing that I could buy.
    I don't think we could afford to change my car and get adaptions :(:(
    The consultant has said I can drive I haven't reported anything else....I'm not driving and not got adaptions YET :wink: So he is the only one I've spoken to about it.
    Thanks again everyone.......I'll read through them again. I'm in for the rest of the evening.

    OH ...I'm not exactly housebound. I don't want anyone thinking that. Peter is great, takes me everywhere but it would be lovely to have my independence back again. I cant cope with buses at the moment

    Love
    Hileena
  • jennandjennand Posts: 124
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hileena. It sounds to me like you really should be eligible for PIP if you are under 65. There are 2 main elements - daily living and motability. I doubt you would qualify for the motability as it is dependant on your ability to walk. However, it sounds to me like you fit into the daily living component. Basically if you have reduced movement in your arms because of your shoulder it means that you wouldn’t be able to make a main meal or you would need help to wash or bathe ( washing you hair in particular). They do not count the ability to drive as a necessity, it’s just about the ability to feed and bathe yourself. I know you have been refused in the past but maybe you need help filling in the claim forms. It all a matter of knowing how to do it. There is a wonderful site - Benefits and Work - It costs about £20 to join but the advice they give in their downloadable packs is invaluable. Maybe you could try again, even a small amount of money would help.
  • hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi
    There's the rub !!!
    I'm not young :lol: I'm 71 I dont feel it except some days when the pain hits me.....but they wont except that :lol:
    Never mindd......I'll keep searching for something. Thanks for your help

    Love
    Hileena
  • dreamdaisydreamdaisy Posts: 31,567 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Any adaptation must be done professionally otherwise you could find yourself in a considerable amount of boiling water if you are involved in an accident. Insurers always ask if a car has had any modifications (and you have to tell them if it has): a DIY job would immediately invalidate any cover. I think it also has to stated on your driving licence.

    For a minority driving is a necessity thanks to their local topography; for the majority without those restrictions it is a luxury. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Try here

    https://tinyurl.com/y9dbbbtj

    RICA does consumer research for older and disabled people. This is a good leaflet on car adaptions.
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • jennandjennand Posts: 124
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    How about attendance allowance Hileena? This is potentially to pay someone who looks after you, even if that is your spouse. However, I don’t think this is covered on the Benefits and Work site. But your local Citizens advice has welfare advisors who can help with this. They did an excellent job for my M I Law.
  • Airwave!Airwave! Posts: 2,427 ✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I use a ball (knob) on the wheel set at about 2 o'clock, it effectively makes the diameter of the wheel larger and thus easier to turn and you don'need to change the angle of your wrist. My garage won't touch it or they say they will be responsible which as far as I'm concerned is a get out clause!

    They take a little bit of getting used to but then you only need them on slower corners and at parking speeds. Mine came from fleabay and will soon be on its third car. Some newer cars have a 'city' setting for the steering wheel which increases the help from the electric motor on the steering that most cars have these days.

    As far as I know the ball is an aid not an adaptation and dvla does not need to be informed.
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Have you had any more thoughts on how to approach this problem, Hileena? A new car for Christmas maybe :wink: christmas02
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
  • hileena111hileena111 Posts: 7,099
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi Sticky
    No new ideas at all. Just try and be patient LOL That will be a miracle :lol:
    As for a new car....even for Christmas.....not a chance.. No way can we afford a new car :wink:

    Hope you have a wonderful Christmas christmas04

    Love
    Hileena
  • stickywicketstickywicket Posts: 25,993 ✭✭✭
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I'm sorry it's proving difficult. Not driving ia hard when you're used to it. Mind you, in the end my car was costing me more than it was worth for the amount of driving I was doing. Taxis proved cheaper though more inconvenient.

    Have a lovely Christmas anyway, Hileena. It's been a tough year for you and you deserve a good one christmas05
    “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem - neat, plausible, and wrong.” H.L. Mencken
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