Gym and PsA

Cheifprofanity
Cheifprofanity Member Posts: 4
edited 10. Jan 2018, 11:40 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hey guys,

First time poster here.

I have been recently diagnosed with PsA and will be going onto Biologic injections as of the end of January. Although my weight hasn't come into my diagnosis I could still loose a few pounds and I have a friend who is happy to join me at a local gym. I'm just worried about doing myself more damage than good!

My rheumatologist specialist just told me not to hurt myself but can any one recommend a good series of exercise that would help weight loss but also not kill my knees/ankles/knuckles/back....Well EVERYTHING but my elbows strangely....

Many advice would be well received!

Chris.

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Chris and welcome to the forums from the moderation team.

    I am very sorry to hear about your diagnosis of Psoriatic Arthritis. Good news that you will be commencing biologic treatment at the end of the month.

    At this time of the year I suspect many of us would like to lose a little weight, but can understand you do not want to do yourself any harm.

    If you haven’t been exercising for a while it might be that you would be better starting cautiously and attach the following link by Arthritis Research UK with exercises:

    https://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/exercises-to-manage-pain.aspx

    If you have time it might be worth doing a search on here, (top of the page next to FAQ), as many of our members have lost quite substantial amounts of weight through diet alone despite having arthritis. There are also plenty who still exercise and one or two who have recently begun to do so.

    We have a great community here, with have lots of experience of arthritis, I know they will make you very welcome and help in any way they can so do ask away!

    I look forward to seeing you posting in future.

    Best wishes

    Ellen.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,223
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi there, Chris, and welcome from me too.

    It's bad news that you have PsA but fantastic that you have been fast-tracked onto biologics.

    Exercise is very important for those of us with arthritis. It's also important to keep our weight down. However, combining the two? I think you need to tread carefully. As Ellen says, we have several slimming successes on here but I think mostly it's by diet. I think if you're trying to lose weight in the gym you might be tempted to overdo things on the arthritis front. Always stop when you feel you can do more but, if you do overdo it, don't abandon the exercise just be aware of the need to do less next time.

    Have you looked at Arthritis Care'a booklet on exercise? It will give a broad outline of what's good amd what's not.

    Best of luck!
  • Cheifprofanity
    Cheifprofanity Member Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Thanks for the replies guys!

    First off thank you for your concern but I was releaved ro get my diagnosis! I've been in pain for nearly two years and always thought it was just because I was overweight/didn't exercise enough/generally worked too hard. Although I've had some down days recently there is defiantly light on the horizon!

    I will give the forum a good search. I've always been a bit of a larger chap and have been working on my diet for some time I was trying to find something to help and get me more active!
  • Rach1972
    Rach1972 Member Posts: 10
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi, I have RA and occasionally use my local gym. Most gyms now have an instructor experienced in working with people with disabilities. They can put together a programme for you specifically to your needs and to avoid damage. Just listen to your body and don’t over do it.
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,431
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi, I qualify to give a reply! I really felt the need to get out and do more exercise so I went back to what I used to do (no learning involved, my muscle memory was still there) so I started off gently about 16 months ago and have worked back to what I used to do, not for as long or as well since stiffness is a problem.

    The exercise is very welcome and supplemented by other types, the type I do is similar to a gifted beginner and may well be looked down on by fitter people but at least I enjoy it. Apart from cost and the winter, things are going well. I'm not keen on gyms and prefer the outdoors and as always in our position its a toss up between supporting our bodies with exercise versus wear and tear (I include all types of arther in this statement)/pain etc etc.

    Our NHS is very good but the answers, for arthers is self help for many things, if you want to exercise then you will and its just a matter of finding the right type and how much for you; we're all at different stages, ages and abilities.
    This is a very incomplete answer but I hope it rings a bell.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello, I have PsA and think it excellent that you are starting the proper meds so soon: I did not have that opportunity so my joint damage is extensive and has led to OA in some very useful places. I have a thread called 'Me and the Personal Trainer' (I think!) which documents my recent experiences in working with someone to increase my physical stamina etc. It's not helped to reduce my pain levels, if anything it's increased them, but at least it's a different hurt which is refreshing.


    I felt it necessary for me to work with someone on a one-to-one basis (and in a private setting) so I could gain confidence in my abilities without feeling pressured. I do not set myself targets because I know that on my poorer days I won't be able to meet them so why 'fail' before I've begun? I am please with whatever I manage to do and, having ventured into the gym, give not one hoot what others may think of my feebleness: one of the benefits of advancing years is the general 'up yours' sense that one develops :wink: Come April I begin my 22nd year of this nonsense, I started aged 37 and, given my history of auto-immune troubles since birth, it was no great surprise.

    I wish you well in your endeavours, losing weight before joint damage occurs should help to prevent it happening which is a positive thing. DD
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,431
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    DD-, you mention weight loss, my oh goes out on Wednesdays and me being lazy I just cook a mushroom omelette, lo and behold this was enough to make me lose weight (?!) But since it works I will continue but with two nights from now, eat what I like the rest of the week.

    That and the exercise and I am but a shadow of my former self (believe that and you'll believe anything!) But it does work.
  • sve170
    sve170 Member Posts: 14
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi everyone
    I too was diagnosed with PsA approx 10yrs ago following a couple of years where a couple of my finger joints were inflamed.
    Since then I have only been taking Naproxen, Sulfasalazine and Methotrexate tablets, and the odd Kenelog injection when needed which over the years has not been that many.
    Reading this post I am wondering what the Biologic Injections are. I have never heard of this type of treatment and certainly never been offered it by my GP. Can anyone enlighten me on this drug.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,223
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hi sve170.

    Your GP won't offer biologics as they are prescribed, like DMARDS, only by rheumatologists. They are newer drugs than conventional DMARDS and, if the conventional ones are working for you you are unlikely to be offered biologics partly because they are much more expensive and partly because, being newer, less is known about potential long term side effects. I've been on methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine for 17 years and never been offered biologics because I don't need them. Normally we have to 'fail' on two conventional DMARDS before we are offered them. You can read up on them here. Just scroll down the page. https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/treatments-aids-and-equipment/medication-for-your-arthritis-/disease-modifying-anti-rheumatic-drugs .
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have a friend with PsA who is (and has been for years) beautifully controlled on six sulph tablets per day. He'd never heard of meth until I enlightened him, an arthritic world in which I wish I lived so I console myself with the thought that at least I am doing things properly.

    The biologics are expensive but as patents expire newer and much cheaper bio-similar are coming along and some on here are taking those. It is up to the rheumatologist to prescribe but from what you have said it doesn't sound as though you are a candidate. Hand-on-heart I can honestly say that you are not missing out. DD
  • Cheifprofanity
    Cheifprofanity Member Posts: 4
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was on naproxen and a gastro-restrictant drug (the name escapes me) but they where barely helping. The rheumatologist did say he was jumping me up a few levels due to how intense my case is.

    By chance I've just had a call this morning conforming delivery of the Biological injections! I will be starting on Friday next week so will let you all know how it goes. I'm not expecting instant results but as long as my leg dosnt fall off I'm ok!

    Going back to the subject at hand at work had an offer in the post from our local Bannatynes gym, do you think the trainers there would be able to work with someone with PsA?
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I have absolutely no idea about whether someone from there could help an arthritic. I think the crucial thing is to find someone with whom you get on well, be prepared to explain how the arthritis impacts on your life (those without it don't have a clue) and don't push your body too hard. DD

    PS If you haven't done so already have a read through of The Spoon Theory and There's a Gorilla in my House, both give very clear and succinct explanations of the challenges we face living with chronic conditions.