Steroid injection

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kfrweaving
kfrweaving Member Posts: 45
edited 14. Feb 2018, 06:25 in Living with Arthritis archive
I was at the hospital the other day for an appointment and i have been put on a waiting list for a steroid injection. I had one over a year ago, but it lasted a few weeks. I've asked for another one as the pain has increased in my hip (partly i know this is the cold weather). I going to go abroad for a week in March or April where i plan to do a lot of trecking around museums, so am keeping my fingers crossed that time wise things work out. If i can get a week of no pain or reduced pain i will be very happy!
I was asked if i could be available at short notice......i said, YES!
Sleep has been a nightmare. But the consultant is hesitating over any operation because of my epilepsy. It has been frustrating for my Epilepsy Nurse at the hospital are still waiting on results of an epilepsy scan that i had done at another hospital last October! I've been told that i simply could be one of these people who can manage on steroid injections every so often.
The cold weather is proving hell. Last winter i don't remember being in such pain. If i wasn't doing swimming things really would be dire. But all that i can say is that the Orthopaedic staff are fantastic.....it's just the communication between different hospitals that's annoying!

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  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Steroid jabs are unpredictable things. I'm glad your previous one worked and I hope this one will too.

    Whether or not it does don't be too proud to use a disability scooter when they are on offer at museums etc.

    I know there are people on here who have epilepsy and have had joint replacements but I also know that epilepsy is a complicated thing which is different in different people. I do hope the jab comes at the right time and helps a lot.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I've used walking aids for years, they have enabled me to do more, go further, join in more, last longer and have also (as I recently discovered) had the beneficial effect of preserving the ROM in my creaky hips. I have had a number of steroid jabs over the years but only one worked and only for three months: the disappointment when all resumed as normal in my right ankle wasn't worth the temporary relief in that joint.

    It seems so unfair that one health condition can have such an impact on remediating another, I am so sorry. I know that Hileena has epilepsy and she has had joint replacements, it might be worth PMing her as she is in a similar boat. She is currently absent from the forum due to a sever chest infection but I am sure she will be back. I am an old hand at doing my 'medmin' (medical administration) as I learned long ago that those who should be doing it aren't that bothered or interested: things might matter to us but to them there is no urgency whatsoever. I hope you get some answers (and a successful steroid jab) soon, please let us know how you get on. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • kfrweaving
    kfrweaving Member Posts: 45
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Dreamdaisy....your comment about 'creaky hips' really made me laugh! When i last went swimming with my 8yr old nephew i had to explain to him why i couldn't do breast stroke, and whilst the pool instructor walked past he shouted out "it's ok! my auntie has a creaky hip! She'll be fine!"
    What i am going to do this time round is keep more of a note of how long i'm without pain after the injection and how long it lasts. I didn't do that last time and with my medication i have memory problems! So i find myself being a bit vague when i get to the consultant.
    The swimming is good for me......it's just the walking in the cold to the pool and getting out of the pool afterwards that's the annoying part!
  • KarenB2274
    KarenB2274 Member Posts: 9
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi,

    I have now had 2 steroid injections and find I have a massive relief from them for a good couple of months.

    A previous poster said something about if you can manage on steroids, keep on. I'm just wondering, is there a limit to how many injections you can have? Does it depend on your LHA?

    I hope you find the relief you are looking for. I can definitely vouch it worked for me and almost every other woman in the hospital that day. Almost instant relief.

    Karen x
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Steroids when they work are terrific but they are not specific - they thin all body tissues which is why they are not a long-term treatment, plus they do not address the underlying issues, merely mask the symptoms. I took a low dose of oral steroids for three years and was sent for a routine DEXA scan (a measurement of bone density). Mine were thinning so I took a year to come off the tablets: after eighteen months clear my density had increased by 3.4% thus reducing my risk of osteoporosis.

    We all react differently to different meds but steroids seem to be helpful to many and boy, do they feel good while they last! DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    KarenB2274 wrote:
    I'm just wondering, is there a limit to how many injections you can have? Does it depend on your LHA?

    I think the answers are 'yes' and 'possibly'. There is certainly a time limit as to how many one can have in a year and that's because of the reasons DD outlined. They can do harm while apparently doing good. Local trusts might also have their own restrictions.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • KarenB2274
    KarenB2274 Member Posts: 9
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you for the replies.

    DD - just wondering, I didn't know you could take steroids orally. What could I possibly ask for at my GPs? I am there for a number of reasons in a couple of weeks - wouldn't mind discussing with him.

    Thank you again
    x
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    The usual name for oral steroids is prednisolone (aka pred) but they bring the same troubles I noted before which is why I gave them up. I have no idea what you could ask your GP apart from perhaps doing a pain relief review. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Sylvie37
    Sylvie37 Member Posts: 1
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I would like to know if epidural injections are available instead of steroid injections.I have heard that you can request them.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Sylvie37 wrote:
    I would like to know if epidural injections are available instead of steroid injections.I have heard that you can request them.



    Hi Sylvie and welcome to the forums.

    I'm not quite sure what you mean by "epidural injections" as I thought that was with anaesthetics just prior to surgery.

    There is a good Q&A regarding steroids on the Arthritis Research web site which discusses steroid injections:

    https://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/q-and-a/drugs/steroids.aspx

    Do tell us a bit more about yourself and how arthritis affects you: replies from forum members can then be more helpful in any support they can provide for your situation.

    All best wishes
    Brynmor
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello from me, too, Sylvie :D

    I'm with Brynmor. I've had epidurals for surgery but have never heard of them going into joints. Are you sure that's what you meant? Do check and then get back to us. We'd love to help if we can.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • palo
    palo Member Posts: 240
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have heard of nerve blocks, as I was offered me for my sciatica.

    It is a combination of steriod and anesthetic, perhaps that is an option.

    As a long term using of steriods I would definitely not recommend them if possible. In fact after being on them for 19 years I am hoping to come off them this year..