Help with arthritis in feet and shoes

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JeremyDEagle
JeremyDEagle Member Posts: 3
edited 18. Feb 2018, 06:05 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi, I'm new here and after some help. I'm 38 and have osteoarthritis in my feet. I'm having a difficult time find shoes that, at 38, I'm happy to wear!

The main problem is that I have to wear insoles as I have flat feet. However, due to the arthritis I had a lump on the top of my foot (Metatarsal-Cuniform Exostosis) that had to be surgically removed. This makes it incredibly difficult to find shoes that fit my insoles in without crushing my foot into the top of the shoes.

I can wear Stan Smith trainers but all the other shoes I used to wear (hand made leather boots by Loake, Grenson etc) I can no longer wear. I don't want to just wear white trainers for the rest of my life.

I've tried Dr Comfort shoes and these are ok(ish). They're generally pretty ugly and Herman Munsterish. Plus for some reason they feel the need to emblazon them with 'Dr Comfort' logos all over them too.

I do have the option of getting some shoes made to measure, but the cost for that is immense.

I just want well made, stylish and comfortable shoes :(

Has anyone else faced this problem and how how you got round it?

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello JeremyDEagle

    Welcome to our forum. You will find lots of advice and support from our members.

    Shoes can be a struggle for those of us whos feet are affected by arthritis. Arthritis Research UK have a guide that may help

    www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/daily-life/footwear.aspx

    You can also call our helpline on 0808 800 4050

    Good luck

    Sharon T
    Moderator
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    This is a perennial problem isn't it, the assumption that if you need 'comfortable' shoes then you aren't fussed about looks.
    Have you seen a podiatrist to discuss the problem? Perhaps tailoring the insole(orthotic) would provide the support you need but free up space elsewhere?
    I have had problems with shoe fitting ever since I was a child - broad feet, narrow heels, more than half a size difference in width and length between right and left, and now OA is beginning to add itself. In recent years I have adopted the strategy of trying on shoes, especially during sale season, without weighing up whether I think they will work(within reason!) and if they are comfortable then I buy them. I now have a much better 'database' of which brands are likely to be OK, and a feel for the differences in sizing - the continental sizes I find much better - which has broadened my search area from '5 and half' to 'between 4 and half and 6' English sizes.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello, it's interesting to read your post as it is coming from a male perspective: I guess the fact you can no longer wear heels is not a factor in your dilemma. :wink:

    I have psoriatic arthritis which affects all my toes and osteo which affects my ankles, knees and hips so comfortable footwear is important. I also have flat feet, perhaps as a result of walking difficulties but I never had much of an arch to start with. When I wear my insoles my knees face the front as opposed to turning slightly out, thus my joints are re-aligned so they grind together more efficiently (I am bone-on-bone through both). I require comfy footwear but have some uncomfies too; I wear the comfy when travelling to an event then switch into the uncomfies for the event then switch back for the journey home.

    Quality footwear is a must, I buy in the sales but luckily I am of an age where trends and style are immaterial. I agree about not wanting to be stuck in trainers for ever but they do offer good support which is important. I have found brands such as Oxygen fantastic, they offer bright, colourful shoes which are also comfortable, Hotter are OK but frumpy - their deep toe box is a thing of joy but the styles don't necessarily fit mine. I find some Clarks shoes OK too. It might be worth having a look European brands, the Danes especially understand style. It is a matter of experimentation, be prepared to make some costly errors! DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • JeremyDEagle
    JeremyDEagle Member Posts: 3
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks for all the replies so far, very helpful. And thank you for the welcome.

    I have seen a podiatrist who helped me with the insoles. IT was spotted as I had some many problems with my knees. The insoles helped with that but unfortunately it's really hurt my feet, so they're continually uncomfortable.

    It's strange really, as I can still play football quite comfortably, but walking for more than a couple of miles isn't nice.

    And yes, heels aren't really a concern for me! However, I missed having really nice, well made shoes and boots to wear.

    I live in a small town with only one podiatrist and I get the feeling she mainly deals with 'older' people. I kinda hoped she'd suggest some ultra thin or custom made orthotics but it didn't go anywhere when I asked. I work in Manchester so I've messaged quite a few podiatrists and orthotic specialists around there who deal with more sports oriented stuff so I'm wondering if that might help.
  • dibdab
    dibdab Member Posts: 1,498
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Jeremy,

    I sympathise with the shoe thing, I used to look forward to choosing new shoes, now I dread trying to find wide/deep shoes for my orthotics. Can I offer 2 thoughts- my orthotics come from the orthotics dept of the local hospital, and I have a full shoe pair and half length pair which helps with depth at the front; also I discovered a company on line called Simply Feet who sell shoes with different widths and some with a deeper toe box-I know they do men's shoes, boots and trainers but haven't looked at them so have no idea how fashionable they are.

    Hope you get some useful answers from your other enquiries.

    Deb
  • Rhian2301
    Rhian2301 Member Posts: 5
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    HI i have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and find it extremely hard ti find shoes which are both comfortable and fashionable. Im 35 years old and dont want to wear old peoples shoes lol. Ive bought sketchers in the past but they still hurt my feet. any suggestions please?
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I am on my 8th pair of walking/trainer types shoes and wear nothing else now, with carbon inserts and added shapes as well now, the deep soles and breathable membranes go to keeping me more comfortable.

    I always buy a size larger to allow my toes to stick up after joint operations, I think its 15 degrees rise. All the weight went on my other joints after the ops so they're all bu#$@€£d as well now!

    Give up with sensible or fashion shoes, its not worth it.
  • River
    River Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello, I have rheumatoid arthritis in my feet and shoes are a problem for me too (I am female but never wanted to wear high heels either!). I was recently recommended a company called widerfitshoes (not sure if I'm allowed to mention them by name but no doubt the name will be removed if necessary. I don't work for them by the way!)

    Anyway they have very precise sizing --not just full and half sizes. You measure the circumference as well as the length and breadth of your feet, and many of their shoes have removeable insoles to give you more cushioning or more room as required (and of course you can remove the insole for one foot and not the other, or whatever). I have ordered a pair from them but they haven't arrived yet so I can't speak from experience yet but I liked the idea. Good luck with it, anyway.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    River there is no problem with naming companies which we have found useful. The exception to this is if someone is advertising which you obviously aren't!

    Do please post back if you found your new shoes comfortable. :)

    Ellen
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Perhaps us blokes should go and get some heels if it makes that much difference, I jest! 👠👡
  • River
    River Member Posts: 16
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    You can have my share if you like, Airwave.

    Ellen, thank you, and yes I will do.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 3,635
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi River,
    shoes really are a very big issue, if you can by any chance take a picture and put it up for us to see that would be amazing! There are lots of women are and men out there who struggled to get comfortable shoes. Fingers crossed these will be very comfortable for you.
    Best Wishes
    Sharon
  • Megrose2
    Megrose2 Member Posts: 331
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I struggle to find comfortable shoes too and eagerly read any posts by people recommending various makes with which they're happy. However, just to add insult to injury I take a size 2 1/2, so adult shoes - even a size 3 -are too big for me.

    Anyone else take such a small size and can recommend a comfortable brand for arthritic feet?