Winter. Bouffe.

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Quintus
Quintus Member Posts: 62
edited 14. Feb 2018, 15:01 in Community Chit-chat archive
Well, it is still the nasty season. Even here. Rather difficult to find some interesting stuff to eat. I like cooking. I hate cooking for myself. Since I stopped my volunteer work I hardly cook anymore. But I'd like to read about your winter recipes. I know it is not easy to handle the season. But I am curious to read about your secrets!

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  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Haven't you heard, we don't do seasonality in this country anymore?!
  • Quintus
    Quintus Member Posts: 62
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Even not if it comes to cooking? Tomatoes? Eggplants? Zucchini? Typical winter veggies?
    Ok. I just tried. And now I am very sad.... bon...
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Go on then, I'll go for it! I've just modified my fish stew:-

    packet of white fish, half a sweet potatoe, wine, large onion, cumin seeds, coriander leaves, garlic, half a large pepper, 1/4 packet of chopped toms and white wine. A lemon and chopped parsley.

    Ground up a handful of cumin and coriander put in pan, chop up the onion and garlic to suit add olive oil and brown them, add fish stock, wine and rest of ingredients. Season to taste. Walk away and leave to simmer for an hour. Serve with rice or pasta or crushed pots, add chopped parsley and a twist of lemon to taste.

    Serve with homemade garlic bread, its a winter warmer.
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    No secrets. I'm a very plain cook having been blessed with a husband and two sons who would eat anything as long as there was plenty of it.

    Winter warmers are casseroles - beef, chicken, sausage, bean (not all at once :wink: ); pies - fish, leek carrot and potato, cheese and onion and a strange invention that works for me - a sort of oven-baked ratatouille with lasagne and grated cheese.

    But I still have to have at least one salad per week or I get withdrawal symptoms.

    And my daughter-in-law does some lovely soups with cheese scones.

    Oh, and being in Scotland, porridge for breakfast when it's really cold.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Kitty
    Kitty Member Posts: 3,583
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    COOKING? Oh you mean that thing my husband (and carer) does 3 times a day. :shock:

    "Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." Robert A Heinlein

  • Quintus
    Quintus Member Posts: 62
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Kathleen T! I have absolutely no idea what your husband does 3 times a day! How should I?
    StickyWicket and others: I don't eat animals. My downtown appartement is much too small for cattle keeping. Even a modest pig would cause problems. Plus I am much too lazy to clean up the blood stains after cutting their throats! I have to do without things with eyes.
    Winter. Choucroute season! I prépare nearly everything possible with choucroute. Lasagne, quiche, bolognaise, some kind of Moussaka and even sandwiches.
    Not 3 times a day though, Kathleen T!
  • daffy2
    daffy2 Member Posts: 1,636
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have to do without things with eyes.
    No potatoes then Quintus.....?
    I like cabbage and its cousins, unfortunately they don't like me, so I have to be rather selective about what, when and how much. I have a bargain(reduced to 9p) sweet pointed cabbage in the fridge at the moment and will be looking out my Madhur Jaffrey recipes as spices help with digestion. With luck it will stay in usable condition for long enough to enjoy more than one meal.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Peel and chop some sweet potatoes. Peel and chop a parsnip or two. Add vegetable stock, a tablespoon of curry powder of your preferred strength (or make your own) and a tin of cannellini beans. Simmer until the veg has softened enough to blend or mash. Consume with fresh, crusty bread.

    Here we have signs of spring, flowers are appearing despite the frost and cold winds, the days are lengthening but winter still has some time to go . . . . . bouffe indeed. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Quintus
    Quintus Member Posts: 62
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Sharon: I just had a look at your link! My o my: fantastic stuff on it! Thank you!
  • Quintus
    Quintus Member Posts: 62
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hey Daffy 2! Choucroute has something to do with cabbage. But as hard as I tried- there is no English equivalent to be found. In fact it is some form of conservation the Chinese have invented. Not only for cabbage, though. It's called lacto- fermentation. You may do that with parsnips, green beans, beet roots etc. And cabbage, of course. And again: unfortunately I could not find a translation for it. The taste is definitely different to non lacto- fermented cabbage. Try it! 😊