Kettle tipper recommendation?

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Megrose2
Megrose2 Member Posts: 331
edited 21. Feb 2018, 10:58 in Living with Arthritis archive
I'm thinking of getting a kettle tipper as the arthritis in my hands makes me rather unsafe pouring boiling water. There are so many on the market, I wondered if others have one and which type they preferred or found most suitable.

Meg

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  • Babsb
    Babsb Member Posts: 26
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Meg. I have a tipper for kettle. It was brought in by occupational therapist. Sorry don't know who's it is but they probably all work the same. I found it a great thing to have as my hands are not very good .i have a jug so am able to fill kettle easier. babsb
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    It's like all things, Meg, personal preference is the key and one man's lifesaving gadget is another's total waste of money.

    Do you have an aids shop in your area? In an ideal world you would be able to go and try some to find what works best for you but sadly none of us seem to live in one of those. Is switching to a travel kettle a possible solution? They are smaller and lighter which might help matters. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Slosh
    Slosh Member Posts: 3,194
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I have a Breville (other makes such as Morphy Richards are available), one cup.
    It looks similar to a jug kettle but you put your mug underneath, press a button and it very quickly boils and pours the right amount of water into your mug. It's also supposed to save electricity as it only boils one mugful of water at a time. I refill it using a plastic jug. I have a Morphy Richards one too (used to have one in my office at work), which is a bit slower but has the ability to adjust the amount of water boiled.
    If I need to put water in a saucepan I either put the pan underneath and just press the button 2 or 3 times, or do the same with a jug and then use that to fill the pan.
    He did not say you will not be storm tossed, you will not be sore distressed, you will not be work weary. He said you will not be overcome.
    Julian of Norwich
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,730
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    For years I've gone down an alternative route. I just buy kettles but go to shops where I can have a good look before buying - usually Curries but the current one is Tesco.

    1. They must have a side handle. Top handles put a dreadful strain on hands.

    2. They must be lightweight. This usually means cheap.

    3. The top must either come off completely and easily for filling or must bend back to a reasonable degree. (Many don't.)

    I never fill them more than I have to but, at a pinch, I can usually pour from a full kettle as follows:

    1. Put water in and carry using one hand on the handle and one on the spout. (The kettle is cold at this point._

    2. When it has boiled, lift it from its stand to unit top using side handle and, if not much water in, spout. If full of boiled water use a tea towel against far side of kettle so that you are lifting both sides with both hands.

    3. Slide kettle to end of unit top and place left hand underneath spout side where it's still cold. This makes it very easy to pour and control.

    I've never had a problem with this method, over...probably....about thirty years. For some reason I've always resisted tippers, maybe because I've never been the only person boiling kettles and they seem limited in how much they'll pour out.
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright
  • Megrose2
    Megrose2 Member Posts: 331
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thank you everybody, that's all really helpful. I really like your method, Sticky, and must try this. Thank you for taking the time to write it all out. Also interested in the Breville, Slosh, and will definitely have a look at that, too. As far as I'm aware, there is no aids shop in my area, DD, otherwise it would definitely be good to try kettles out.

    This all came about when my husband came into the kitchen and saw me pouring boiling water out of the kettle into a mug. I was using both hands around the handle, which seemed OK to me, but was told that I must ask him to pour boiling water in the future. Very kind of him, but I can't be faffing around like that, hence looking at tippers. :D Thank you all again for your help.

    Meg
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    I know from experience how easy it is for those who do not have arthritis to advise those who do as to how things should or should not be done. What do they know? If what you were doing works for you, you know it and are happy with doing it then stick to it. Personally I cannot bear the thought of a tipper - plus they are bulky things to have on a worktop. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • Airwave!
    Airwave! Member Posts: 2,468
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Our tipper was awkward to use and never got flushed out to get rid of any scale and of course it ends up with more deoxygenated water (boiled) in it which as far as I'm concerned does not make a decent cuppa!

    Tippers, smaller kettles, we seem to have tried them. Smaller kettles often have a permanent lead on some and the lids don't flip up. Choices choices!

    We haven't tried the small boilers set under the sink, too expensive, might be worth a think about?