Stiffness

Jinksy
Jinksy Member Posts: 3
edited 23. May 2018, 08:56 in Say Hello Archive
Hello all,

I have had arthritis in my hands for years, I had them xrayed last year to confirm. Wearing rings is no longer an option as my knuckles have changed so much.
Now it’s the turn of my knees, hips and right foot. My knees have creaked coming down stairs for a while, now they are really stiff first thing and so are my feet. I do walk daily, usually twice a day as we have dogs and do a health walk. I find it I have to sit for a journey or cinema I’m really stiff when I stand up again.

I am 74 so I can expect to be like this. My problem is I cannot take anti inflammatories so what else can I do when it gets worse.Some days are worse than others so I guess diet may have something to do with it.

Thanks for having me.

Comments

  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello Jinksy, it's nice to meet you and I am sorry you have had to find us. It sounds as though osteo arthritis is behind your troubles, I have it too as a result of my other kind, an auto-immune sort. I know all too well the feeling of 'seizing up' when sitting still for too long, it isn't nice is it?

    Personally the only aspect of diet which affects mine is that if I eat too much acidic food such as pickles, chutneys and tomatoes things worsen. I can control my pain levels to a certain extent by not over doing things and pacing activities, walking such as you are able to do hasn't been possible for many years but I am now able to do nearly a mile unaided - it hasn't been easy getting to this point but I am pleased I can. What I cannot control is the weather, low pressure, the damp and the cold certainly have a deleterious effect but even wall-to-wall sunshine ain't ideal.

    If I overdo things then inflammation can be a nuisance but it's localised to my knees and ankles and goes after a few hours or days. I use 30/500 cocodamol for pain relief - it's effective enough to allow me to get on with things but ineffective enough for pain feedback to alert me so I know when to stop for a rest. I began with psoriatic arthritis when I was thirty seven and am now fifty nine, my OA was diagnosed in 2011. I don't know how long I had had it because it was hidden by the other - some joints have one, some the other and others both so life ain't too easy but hey, who said it should be? :lol: DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • moderator
    moderator Moderator Posts: 4,086
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Good morning Jinksy
    and welcome to the forum. I am sorry to hear that your arthritis seems to be getting worse, did your Dr mention what type of arthritis it is. Unfortunately lots of people cannot take anti inflammatory medication so you are not alone. If pain is the issue then there are lots of other choices that you might find useful. Here is a link to our pain booklet https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/living-with-arthritis/managing-pain
    Also might I suggest that you talk to your GP about it because if it is an inflammatory arthritis you may need to see a rheumatologist so that you can get some treatment to dampen down the disease so that it is under better control. You can always phone our free confidential helpline for a chat their number is 0808 800 4050
    Let us know how you get on, we always like to support people. I am sure other forum members will be along shortly to say hello
    Best Wishes
    Sharon
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    Hello from me too :D

    I don't think you can 'expect to be like this' at 74. Many people seem to get away with it. In fact, my 75 yr old husband, a sportsman of one sort or another all his life, is astonished that a hip is starting to play up :lol: However, none of us gets out scot free and, on here, we all understand the frustrations of arthritis in one form or another - or, in the case of DD, myself and several others, in one form and another :roll:

    Loads of us can't take NSAIDS (anti-inflammatories). The other - medical - options are straightforward painkillers. They don't, of course, unless we take them in such quantities that we are too deep in sleep most of the time to actually enjoy life. But, used carefully, they do make life easier and make more options possible.

    Exercise is essential. Although walking the dogs is good you might find not every joint that needs it gets a good workout so exercises or pilates or some gentle all-body workout might help. As for sitting too long - yes, do take every option to stand and stretch, obviously not in the middle of a film :wink: but at intervals etc. And just keep shifting position a bit. It all helps. Not a lot but.....

    Re diet - there are lots of ideas about but no real conclusions except from those wanting to sell a book :roll: Basically a Mediterranean diet and a healthy weight are the best options.

    Here are some of Arthritis Care's ideas about living with arthritis. Maybe some might help. https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/living-with-arthritis
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • Jinksy
    Jinksy Member Posts: 3
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    moderator wrote:
    Good morning Jinksy
    and welcome to the forum. I am sorry to hear that your arthritis seems to be getting worse, did your Dr mention what type of arthritis it is. Unfortunately lots of people cannot take anti inflammatory medication so you are not alone. If pain is the issue then there are lots of other choices that you might find useful. Here is a link to our pain booklet https://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/living-with-arthritis/managing-pain
    Also might I suggest that you talk to your GP about it because if it is an inflammatory arthritis you may need to see a rheumatologist so that you can get some treatment to dampen down the disease so that it is under better control. You can always phone our free confidential helpline for a chat their number is 0808 800 4050
    Let us know how you get on, we always like to support people. I am sure other forum members will be along shortly to say hello
    Best Wishes
    Sharon


    Hello Sharon,

    Thanks for replying to me. No my doctor didn’t say what type of arthritis I have but I’m assuming that’s it’s OA. My mum had it in her hands and knees and her sister had it in her hands quite badly.
    My sister is seven years younger than I am and she also started
    with her hands and it’s now in her knees and feet.

    I also have acid reflux and a sensitive stomach so when I saw the doctor I told him I couldn’t take anti inflammatories. He gave me Celebrex and when I got home and checked the box the words that stood out were ‘ increase to twice a day if tolerated’ needless to say I didn’t take one. I also have asthma/ chest problems so that narrows it down even more. I keep saying I should get up a coach trip to Switzerland 🤣

    I’m planning to go back and see a doctor but at the moment it’s difficult. Because of lack of doctors and clinicians appointments are for emergencies only. They keep saying it will improve!

    Kind regards

    Jinksy
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 26,271
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    It's possible that there can be a genetic component to some people's OA but, in view of your family history, it might be worth asking for a rheumatology referral just to make sure.

    Celebrex is an anti-inflammatory but a Cox 2 inhibitor one. They are much better tolerated by the stomach. There are quite a few of us on here who have multiple things to deal with. I have a hiatus hernia, GORD and asthma but, as I also have RA, I just have to swallow some meds and hope. So far so good. You could ask for a stomach-protecting med to go with the celebrex but really, for OA, it tends to be either anti-inflamms, pain meds or both and they all can potentially affect stomachs or asthma. The key word is 'potentially'.

    The lack of access tó docs almost certainly won't improve. There aren't enough, end of. But the way many surgeries go now is to direct non-emergencies to nurses or nurse practitioners. If they deem you need a doc you will get to see one but the nurse practitioners can prescribe some basic meds too and often have far better listening skills than docs.
    "The deeper sorrow carves into your being the more joy you can contain." Kahlil Gibran
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,558
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
    I was born with eczema and developed asthma aged seven. My inhalers control the latter and not once have I had any troubles with any of the meds I have taken for either arthritis, despite a fair few being contra-indicated when one reads the leaflet.

    Celebrex was the only anti-inflammatory I took that actually reduced pain levels, rheumatology prescribed it and I was on one a day: after a few much more comfortable months my GP took me off it because it was too expensive for him to prescribe. My inflammation is now very well controlled by the meds for the PsA but when the OA kicks off I use Voltarol which I buy OTC as I can no longer receive diclofenac on prescription - that could be an alternative for you. Capsaicin cream is another option. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben