Starting methotrexate injections

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vickyb17uk
vickyb17uk Member Posts: 14
edited 16. Nov 2018, 10:31 in Living with Arthritis archive
Hi all. Due to start methotrexate injections tomorrow. Can anyone tell me what will happen at the appointment? Will I have to give myself the Injection there and then or are you able to practice so to speak with a dummy pen so that I can do the real one nearer bedtime? The reason I ask is because I needed to go back to work after and a bit anxious over any side effects

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  • BettyMac
    BettyMac Member Posts: 217
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi Vicky
    I’m sure there’s a degree of variation in how different hospitals go about things so I can only tell you how it was for me.

    I had a very relaxed appointment with the Rheumatology Specialist Nurse. She was very thorough but managed to put me at ease.
    She talked me through the procedure and I did a practice run with the dummy pen.
    Then I did it for real. It’s a really easy device to use and there’s only a wee sting when you do it.
    I usually do it in my thigh - but some people find the belly a better place.
    I had no immediate side effects and was able to drive myself home afterwards.

    I sometimes get a bit of nausea the day after my injection but it doesn’t kick in immediately.

    I’ve also had home visits from the Healthcare-at-Home nurses - when I started on Benepali injections. They were lovely, too. And the procedure was very similar - ie, explain, demo, dummy, real thing.

    Hope it goes well for you tomorrow. Let us know how you get on.
  • vickyb17uk
    vickyb17uk Member Posts: 14
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Thanks. I think it's just nerves over the unknown. Just really don't want to feel ill at work either. I've had the tablets and was really poorly on them.
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    These things vary from hospital to hospital. I was initially trained for enbrel administered via syringe, I rolled up at the hospital, they showed me an orange and I thought 'Stuff that, this junk is going into me' so I did it for myself (the syringe contained sterile water). After years of watching others inject me it was hardly rocket science, after all they are only sub-cut (sub-cutaneous).

    For the humira pen a nurse came out to my house and showed me but I really didn't need the instruction, it's not hard to place the business end against the pinched skin and press a button but I was already familiar with the whole business which I'm sure helped.

    I enjoy (weird word!) the convenience of doing my injections at home, for years I had to go to the hospital for them (towards the end it was twice weekly every fortnight) so this is a boon. I have no trouble doing them and no trouble after, apart from feeling a little extra tired every now and again. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • dreamdaisy
    dreamdaisy Member Posts: 31,520
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hello, I've been thinking about you and wondering how it went; I hope all is well. DD
    Have you got the despatches? No, I always walk like this. Eddie Braben
  • vickyb17uk
    vickyb17uk Member Posts: 14
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    Hi

    All been ok thanks. Have had 2 so far. Third one tomorrow. Was a little bit sick last Friday but had other stuff going on as well and I'm hoping it was a blip because of that rather than the methotrexate. I think also as last week's was first done completely on my own (first one I did myself but with nurse present)I had worked myself up perhaps. Other than just feeling wiped out 2 days later I've been ok.

    Thanks
  • stickywicket
    stickywicket Member Posts: 27,731
    edited 30. Nov -1, 00:00
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    So far, so good, then. I hope it carries on that way :D
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.
    Steven Wright